Happy birthday, Mickey Mouse: creepy photo and first two cartoons!

Above, The Mickey Mouse Club, circa 1930. Below, Mickey's first appearance, a May 15, 1928, test screening of the cartoon Plane Crazy. The film wasn't picked up by a distributor and as a result we celebrate Mickey's birthday on November 18 because that day in 1928 was the first public appearance of the mouse, in Steamboat Willie (below).

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“Long-lost” 1928 Disney animation with 'Oswald the Lucky Rabbit' found in BFI archives

Oswald the Lucky Rabbit.

Mickey Mouse and Bugs Bunny's long-lost, long-eared ancestor has been discovered in the National archive of the British Film Institute.

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Weak Messages Create Bad Situations – A manifesto based on suppressed thoughts


See sample pages at Wink.

According to artist David Shrigley’s message on the back cover of his book, Weak Messages Create Bad Situations, “We are in a bad situation and weak messages are to blame. Lots of individuals in society today are feeble-minded. They don’t know what the hell is going on ... It’s alright. I am here to help you.”

Weak Messages is an over-sized satirical “manifesto” or collection of Shrigley’s deep dark thoughts on all the little and big things that drive our world. Divided into eight chapters (Politics and Opinions, The Arts, Bugs and Insects, The World Explained...), each page contains a child-like drawing along with a hand-written simple opinion or declaration – one-page cartoons that can seem primitively funny at first glance. But read them as a collection and you suddenly find yourself in the depths of Shrigley’s mockingly blunt subconscious where truth, horror, and nervous chuckles abound. But fear not. Shrigley assures us that “If you listen to what I say things will quickly improve.”

Weak Messages Create Bad Situations: A Manifesto by David Shrigley Canongate 2015, 384 pages, 8.2 x 11.2 x 1.1 inches $35 Buy a copy on Amazon Read the rest

T-shirt: Bugs and Gossamer as Han and Chewy

Scoundrels (1)

Deep Fried Art's t-shirt "Scoundrels" ($20 with shipping) depicts Gossamer (the Looney Toons monster) and Bugs as Han and Chewbacca: "I wonder what their ship would look like? The Millenium Carrot??" Read the rest

Watch Pixar co-founder's 1972 computer animations of face and hand


In 1972, Frederic Ira Parke, while a grad student at the University of Utah, created the first computer graphics animation, above, of a human face, and with fellow student (and Pixar co-founder) Ed Catmull made the groundbreaking computer animation, below, of a human hand. Read the rest

Glenn Barr does Wilma Flintstone and Judy Jetson!


In Glenn Barr's new show at Cotton Candy Machine gallery in Brooklyn, you'll see his excellent seedy noir interpretations of Wilma Flintstone (above) and Judy Jetson (below), among other gorgeous new paintings. Read the rest

WATCH: How Looney Tunes' Chuck Jones evolved as an artist

Every Frame a Painting looks at how Chuck Jones evolved into the master of comedic cartooning. The conclusions: Read the rest

Pig Goat Banana Cricket - clip from new Nick cartoon series


Our cartoonist pals, Johnny Ryan and Dave Cooper, have created a bizarrely funny and artistically gorgeous cartoon for Nickelodeon called Pig Goat Banana Cricket, which premiered on Saturday, July 18. Watch out the first episode in its entirety here! Read the rest

May Contain Peanuts: grim philosophical remixes of Charles Schulz funnies

A tumblog of greatness.

Star Wars and Bat-signal crayons

Crayontastik melts down "reputable brand crayons" and recasts them in new forms, like this Star Wars set and these Bat-signal crayons. Read the rest

Adventure Time: The Art of Ooo - Concept art and storyboards from the best cartoon of the century so far

"I am now addicted to Adventure Time; actually, I am in awe of it.” Director Guillermo del Toro expressed this opinion in his forward to this massive book of art from the cartoon series, and I agree with him.

I love everything about Adventure Time: the constrained-crazy character design, the candy-colored otherworldly sets, the untraditional-but-nevertheless-engrossing stories, and the bromantic relationship between Finn the Human and Jake the shape shifting dog, who embark on their Jodorowsky-esque adventures on a post-civilization Earth (all we really know is that our world ended as we knew it after the Great Mushroom War and the cartoon takes place about 1,000 years after).

This book is a deep dive into the Land of Ooo (the new name for Earth), with tons of concept sketches, marked-up scripts, and production art. It’s also an oral history of the development of the series, with interviews from the show’s creative team sprinkled throughout.

Adventure Time: The Art of Ooo, by Chris McDonnell

Take a look at other beautiful paper books at Wink. And sign up for the Wink newsletter to get all the reviews and photos delivered once a week.

article {max-width:1000px} Read the rest

Transformers theme as 1990s R&B


Saturday Morning Slow Jams' slick R&B cover of the Transformers theme. Don't miss their takes on Muppet Babies (below), Ducktales, Pokemon, Animaniacs, and many more.

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1970s cartoon videos for The Kinks, Joni Mitchell, etc.

Over at Dangerous Minds, Richard turns us on to the late animator John David Wilson whose credits include the likes of Disney's Peter Pan, Mr. Magoo cartoons, and the opening to Grease, and also made terrifically fun cartoon music videos for The Kinks, Joni Mitchell, and others that aired in the 1970s on the Sonny and Cher Show!

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Documentary "Stripped" shows the past and future of comic strips

Glenn Fleishman on a crowdfunded journey into the history of comics in America

Interview with the creators of Stripped, feature-length doc about comic strips [New Disruptors Podcast #68]

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Dave Kellett and Fred Schroeder created the movie Stripped about the past, present, and future of comic strips and their creators. Dave is the creator and cartoonist of two webcomics titles, Sheldon and Drive, and the co-author of How To Make Webcomics. He is one of a small but growing group of webcomics artists who are self-sufficient. Fred is a veteran cinemographer, nominated for Best Cinematography at Sundance for his work on Four Sheets to the Wind. He has been shooting commercials for much of his career.

Together, they matched Fred's filmmaking skills with Dave's personal knowledge of the field and his contacts to create the first feature-length documentary on the topic, funded in part through two Kickstarter campaigns. They don't pull punches about the difficulties of being a comic-strip artist, but they show all the joy and love that goes into the work along with many potential bright lights already illuminating parts of the field and shining on the horizon.

The New Disruptors: RSS | iTunes | Download this episode | Listen on Stitcher

This episode is sponsored by:

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Media Temple: Web hosting for artists, designers, and Web developers since 1998. Read the rest

Clever Popeye forearm tattoo

This very clever Popeye tattoo has unclear provenance -- apparently the artist is Russian tattoo artist Alina Fokina from Ufa, Russia, possibly with help from Jaksic Milan.

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RIP Lou Scheimer (Fat Albert, Star Trek: The Animated Series, etc.)

Saturday morning cartoon pioneer Lou Scheimer, whose Filmation company created Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids, Star Trek: The Animated Series, Groovie Goolies, He-Man and the Masters of the Universe, and many other classics of the 1960s, 70s, and 80s, has died. He was 84. Above, Scheimer with some of his Filmation characters in an illustration from the cover of his book, "Lou Scheimer: Creating the Filmation Generation." From the New York Times:

Filmation was considered noteworthy on two counts: it kept production in the United States in an age of increasing outsourcing (then as now, the labor-intensive work of animating many American cartoons was done in Asia) and it sought to produce cartoons with a message of social tolerance.
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