Boing Boing 

Hong Kong protesters take to the street in bras: "breasts aren't weapons"


The latest anti-corruption mass-uprising symbol in Hong Kong is a bra: it protests the jailing of a female protester who was convicted of "assaulting a police officer" with her boob.

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UK restricts dissident artist Ai Weiwei's stay over his “criminal record” in China

An image of Ai Weiwei's passport, posted  to his Instagram account on July 29, 2015.


An image of Ai Weiwei's passport, posted to his Instagram account on July 29, 2015.

Chinese art-dissident Ai Weiwei can't seem to catch a break lately. On July 22, the Chinese government reinstated the prominent artist's passport, and his freedom to leave China, which he'd been denied for four years. Seven days later, Ai just now wrote on Instagram that the UK is restricting his visa over some trumped-up BS about his China “criminal records.”

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Erenhot's enormous kissing dinosaur arch

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Erenhot is a dinosaur fossil hot-spot on the border between China and Mongolia. In an outpouring of civic pride, they erected this fabulous arch made of kissing dinosaurs.

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China lifts game console ban

china1 Plans to ban puns may still be afoot, but China has at last lifted its prohibition on owning game consoles. Though widely unenforced, the official imprimatur of approval is expected to give the domestic game business a huge boost.

China gives outlaw artist Ai Weiwei his passport back. Finally. For now.

Ai Weiwei posted this picture on Instagram on Wednesday after the Chinese authorities returned his passport.


Ai Weiwei posted this picture on Instagram on Wednesday after the Chinese authorities returned his passport.

Ai Weiwei, the Chinese art-provocateur whose work so very consistently pisses off the Chinese government, says he was given back his passport this week after being barred from traveling abroad since he was detained in 2011 in Beijing.

“Today, I received a passport,” he told the world via Twitter and Instagram, attaching a selfie with the document.

From the New York Times:

Mr. Ai, who was a design consultant on the Bird’s Nest stadium in Beijing and exhibited his sculptural installation “Sunflower Seeds” at the Tate Modern in London, was detained in 2011 while trying to fly to Hong Kong from Beijing. He was held and interrogated for 81 days and later prosecuted on a charge of tax evasion. A court ruled against him and said his studio owed $2.4 million in penalties and back taxes.

He has said the case against him was retaliation for his political activism, including his memorializing the thousands of children who died in schools that collapsed during a 2008 earthquake in Sichuan Province.

Ai Weiwei, Chinese Artist and Provocateur, Is Given Back His Passport [nytimes]

今天,我拿到了护照。

A photo posted by Ai Weiwei (@aiww) on

Obama snubs NYC's Waldorf Astoria hotel over China bugging fears, scream tabloids

President Obama. WABC, July 17, 2015.


President Obama. WABC, July 17, 2015.

Most fears about bugs in New York City hotels involve the kind that live in beds. Today, another type of hotel bug is in the news.

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Report: Uber uses GPS to punish drivers in China who get close to protests

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Uber is urging its drivers in China “not to get involved in conflicts with authorities and has threatened to punish those who disobey,” reports the Wall Street Journal.

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Trends in Chinese mobile UIs


Last December, Dan Grover summarized the unique mobile app UI conventions he'd spotted since moving to China the summer before to work for Wechat, a Chinese mobile messaging app that also incorporates a wallet, Evernote-style functionality, a games platform, a people-finder, a song-matching service, and, of course, an email client.

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Amazingly fast counting of Chinese cash

Watch those fingers go!

Below, a classic video showing more cash counting techniques from around the world:

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CNN interview with author of discredited Sunday Times story on Snowden is painful to watch

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If you haven't seen it, you owe it to yourself to watch this video. It's CNN's George Howell interviewing Sunday Times buffoon Tom Harper about his now-discredited report that said the governments of Russia and China have decrypted files leaked by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden.

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Shenzhen - where tiny startups flock to incubate their products

Over at Make, Gareth Branwyn has written a terrific introduction to the "mutant urban marvel that is Shenzhen, a southern Chinese city that’s become not only a global mass market electronics manufacturing juggernaut, but also a place where tiny startups flock to incubate their products and get them to market as quickly and inexpensively as possible."

Survivor's story: Last night's cruise ship disaster in China

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Survivor Zhang Hui, who doesn't know how to swim, only had 30 seconds to grab a life jacket and flee his cruise ship cabin before jumping into the dark choppy water of the Yangtze River in China. Holding on to his life jacket for dear life, he watched the Eastern Star cruise ship quickly turn over. Over 458 passengers were on board, and less than 24-hours later, hundreds are still missing. Here's his story.

Bro Orange: the best stolen iPhone story you'll read all April Fool's Day

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Buzzfeed staffer Matt Stopera's fantastical story about how his stolen iPhone made it from Manhattan to China and turned him into a social media celebrity there is one of the wildest and coolest stolen phone stories of all time, even if it's making the rounds on April Fool's Day.

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India's $11 cellphone could change the world

micromax_joy_x1800_x1850_pouch_package The mobile market in India is flooded with new phones: three a day last year. Local provider Micromax has a gamble to claim a slice of that.

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Leaving China – a painted memoir about growing up during WW2

James McMullan, an illustrator and watercolorist known for his popular theatrical posters for Lincoln Center as well as various children’s book covers, has created a beautiful memoir entitled Leaving China.

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Hong Kong's Umbrella Revolution leaders haunted by dirty-trick harassment campaigns


From following their grandchildren around at kindergarten to hanging slanderous banners outside their homes to hacking their email to sending funeral wreaths to their doors, the leaders of Hong Kong's anticorruption Occupy Central movement face persistent, ongoing reprisals for their political activity.

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