China lifts game console ban


Plans to ban puns may still be afoot, but China has at last lifted its prohibition on owning game consoles. Though widely unenforced, the official imprimatur of approval is expected to give the domestic game business a huge boost. Read the rest

China gives outlaw artist Ai Weiwei his passport back. Finally. For now.

Ai Weiwei posted this picture on Instagram on Wednesday after the Chinese authorities returned his passport.
Chinese art-provocateur whose work so very consistently pisses off the Chinese government, says he was given back his passport this week after being barred from traveling abroad since he was detained in 2011 in Beijing.
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Report: Uber uses GPS to punish drivers in China who get close to protests

To appease the Chinese government, Uber is using GPS on drivers’ phones to ID and threaten any Uber drivers who get too close to the taxi drivers' protests.

Trends in Chinese mobile UIs

Last December, Dan Grover summarized the unique mobile app UI conventions he'd spotted since moving to China the summer before to work for Wechat, a Chinese mobile messaging app that also incorporates a wallet, Evernote-style functionality, a games platform, a people-finder, a song-matching service, and, of course, an email client. Read the rest

Amazingly fast counting of Chinese cash


Watch those fingers go!

Below, a classic video showing more cash counting techniques from around the world:

Read the rest

CNN interview with author of discredited Sunday Times story on Snowden is painful to watch

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If you haven't seen it, you owe it to yourself to do so now.

Shenzhen - where tiny startups flock to incubate their products

Over at Make, Gareth Branwyn has written a terrific introduction to the "mutant urban marvel that is Shenzhen, a southern Chinese city that’s become not only a global mass market electronics manufacturing juggernaut, but also a place where tiny startups flock to incubate their products and get them to market as quickly and inexpensively as possible." Read the rest

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Chinese businessman builds $100m office in shape of Starship Enterprise


NetDragon Websoft’s Liu Dejian, 43, told the Wall Street Journal that the 853-foot-long structure cost 600 million yuan—almost $100 million. The Baidu board member "made it so" after receiving permission from CBS, which owns rights to the TV show.

“That was their first time dealing with issue like this and at first they thought that it was a joke,” said the company in an email.

“They realized somebody in China actually did want to work out a building modeled on the USS Enterprise only after we sent the relevant legal documents,” said the company. It didn’t disclose financial details.

“We have always held a negative attitude toward piracy,” said the company. CBS didn’t respond to requests for comment over the weekend.

Check it out on Google Maps.

Construction, in Fujian province, began in October 2010 and took until 2014. How to make the Starship Enterprise out of a paperclip. Impress your friends! It's easy when you know how. Read the rest

Bro Orange: the best stolen iPhone story you'll read all April Fool's Day


Buzzfeed staffer Matt Stopera's fantastical story about how his stolen iPhone made it from Manhattan to China and turned him into a social media celebrity there is one of the wildest and coolest stolen phone stories of all time, even if it's making the rounds on April Fool's Day. Read the rest

India's $11 cellphone could change the world

The mobile market in India is flooded with new phones: three a day last year. Local provider Micromax has a gamble to claim a slice of that. Read the rest

Leaving China – a painted memoir about growing up during WW2

James McMullan, an illustrator and watercolorist known for his popular theatrical posters for Lincoln Center as well as various children’s book covers, has created a beautiful memoir entitled Leaving China. Read the rest

Hong Kong's Umbrella Revolution leaders haunted by dirty-trick harassment campaigns

From following their grandchildren around at kindergarten to hanging slanderous banners outside their homes to hacking their email to sending funeral wreaths to their doors, the leaders of Hong Kong's anticorruption Occupy Central movement face persistent, ongoing reprisals for their political activity. Read the rest

G+'s Real Names policy has moved to China

Google's dropped its dumbass Real Names policy for social media, but don't worry, the adorable little fella found a welcome home in China, where bloggers and other social media users are now prohibited from using aliases or parody names. Read the rest

Bridging gongkai and free/open source

Bunnie Huang and his team have set out to fully reverse-engineer and document a cheap Chinese Mediatek MT6260. mobile-phone board -- licensed in the complex, informal regime of "gongkai," through which lots of theoretically confidential information is published, but some critical pieces are withheld. Read the rest

Chinese government wants to ban puns

Chinese media regulators have called on broadcasters to end the widespread, longstanding practice of using puns, idiom and wordplay in everyday communications, advertisement, jokes, and political speech. Read the rest

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