How license "agreements" interfere with the right to repair

States across America are considering "Right to Repair" legislation that would guarantee your right to choose who fixes your stuff (or to fix it yourself); but they're fighting stiff headwinds, from the motorcycle makers who claim that fixing your motorcycle should be a crime to Apple, who feel the same way, but about phones. Read the rest

Cecily Strong weighs in on the fauxminist epidemic

Spend enough time in progressive circles, and you'll run into the type of guy lampooned here: the guy who uses progressive catchphases as pickup lines. This skit feels ripped from the headlines of recent podcast drama. Read the rest

The Big Bang Theory but the studio audience is replaced by Ricky Gervais

The awkward, creeping humorlessness of The Big Bang Theory (and perhaps all studio sitcoms) is famously revealed by removing the audience laughter. But it is made truly unsettling by replacement with Ricky Gervais.

BONUS: The Big Bang theory with the laugh track replaced by children screaming:

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3 new Sassy Trumps to take your mind off America's never-ending bad trip

Comedian and soothsayer Peter Serafinowicz brings us Three new 'Sassy Trump' episodes.

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As transgender rights get rolled back, America needs more bathroom cops

In this recruitment video for America's elite Bathroom Police, Officer Tammy Cox explains the duties and obligations of the crack force who will be carrying out Trump Administration mandates in public bathrooms. Read the rest

Philomena Cunk on Shakespeare

You may know Charlie Brooker only through his amazing Black Mirror programs, but savvy Brookerfen are avid viewers of his Screenwipe/Newswipe shows -- acerbic, potty-mouthed media criticism shows that feature talents of Barry Shitpeas and Philomena Cunk, a thick-skulled, oblivious, amazing deadpan comedic persona of Diane Morgan. Read the rest

Are You the Favorite Person of Anybody?

Editor Adam Stein posted this charming 2003 short from back when everyone involved was in a very different place in their career. Directed by Miguel Arteta and written by Miranda July, who also stars. Read the rest

Amazing 3D-printed salad-tossing robot

3D printing reaches new heights with this ingenious robotic salad-tossing machine. This pre-programmed beauty has three modes of operation, one of which will surely match how you like getting your salad tossed. Read the rest

Idiot's guide to Japanese apartments

Rachel & Jun present a helpful introduction to Japanese apartment living. Includes tips on cleaning your tub every day, preparing for earthquakes, and caring for your easily-destroyed tatami mats. Read the rest

How jokes won the election

Emily Nussbaum at The New Yorker takes a deep dive into comedy's outsize role in Trump's victory. It's one of the best long reads about the pop culture that defined this election. To use Emily's comedy metaphor, with notable exceptions like "Delete your account," Hillary and her supporters didn't read the room and were heckled at nearly every turn. Read the rest

Samantha Bee lets Trump enabler Kellyanne Conway have it

Before Trump's omnipresent spokescobra Kellyanne Conway distracted everyone with her inauguration get-up, Samantha Bee delivered a withering assessment of Trump's greatest female enabler of all time (Putin holds the male title). Read the rest

Enter the dangerous world of finger skateboarding

Fingers of Steel chronicles the hardcore world of finger skateboarding. Warning: some of the tricks are so gnarly you'll wonder how fingerboarder Chris Heck escapes with fingers intact. Read the rest

How Louis CK tells a joke

The Nerdwriter presents a fascinating analysis of why Louis CK's jokes are funny.

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Enjoy the weird comedy of “I Am Going To Throw My Christmas Tree Into The Ocean”

This short from sketch comedy group Couch Friends almost defies description. Once the holidays are over, Brendan O'Hare and Cory Snearowski get down to the business of getting rid of their Christmas trees. Read the rest

24 hours of the BBC's Radio Four, in four minutes

Jake Yapp is a British comedian who specialises in doing high-speed summaries of pop culture phenomena, like this Radio Four in 4 Minutes sketch, which is a work of genuine genius, especially the radio drama bits. Read the rest

Media spokesmillennial actually 55 years old

Dan Nainan is a 35-year old who often speaks for the Millennials: he crops up in piece after piece as a secondary source, reinforcing whatever angle the story takes on this most endlessly fascinating of generations.

Ben Collins writes, however, that he's actually a corporate-gig comedian in his mid-fifties. Moreover, the spokesmillennial thing isn't some clever, media-trolling prankery: Nainan insists he's 35, even as public records says otherwise. He obviously wouldn't pass for his claimed age--even his pro headshots are tell-tale--but seems to be doing quite well for himself as retirement age approaches. Which leaves the rather unsettling question: why?

I get it, I told him. It’s time to tell the whole story, I said. Being in your 40s and leaving Intel to become a millionaire comedian is even more impressive than some guy in his 20s making it in comedy like everybody else, right?

So tell me, are you 35 or 55?

Then a pause.

“I’m 35,” he said. “The mistake is in my birth record.”

A few minutes later, he said he wanted to talk to his lawyer before he said anything else.

Discussion centers, fairly, on his representations to the media and our mindless complicity in publishing them. There's also a some spiteful pleasure being had shaming him for his apparent vanity.

I'm struck by the thought that it was once common and reasonable for bachelors to be evasive about their age. The reasons for doing so are largely historical now, but way back when it made it harder for people to find material to blackmail or expose you or otherwise screw with your professional life if there was something about you that could unfairly compromise it. Read the rest

Is this the best UK comedy sketch of the 1970s?

Dave Allen was an Irish comedian popular in the UK from the 1960s until his death in 2005. His reputation is as a cantankerous irreligious fellow, but this family-friendly moment is widely held to be his best sketch. Someone on YouTube thinks it's the best British TV comedy sketch of the 1970s. There's some pretty stiff competition on that front, if you ask me. (Mastermind, from The Two Ronnies, is the best British comedy sketch of the 1980s. Dead Parrot was 1969.) Read the rest

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