Boing Boing 

Pogo in the Age of McCarthy

On May 1, 1953, a rifle-toting bobcat named Simple J. Malarkey ambled into Okefenokee Swamp, the setting for Walt Kelly’s Pogo comic strip, which ran in U.S. newspapers from 1948 until 1975. At the time, Malarkey’s inspiration, Senator Joseph McCarthy, was at the height of his political power, routinely destroying reputations in the name of rooting out Communism. Kelly should have been intimidated, but he mocked the bilious senator from Wisconsin for a year and a half, until one of the newspapers that published Pogo, the Providence Bulletin, threatened to drop the strip if Kelly didn’t drop the character. Seizing upon this fresh opportunity for parody, Kelly promptly drew a new Malarkey panel, hiding Malarkey’s face under a sack. “I’m afeared us will haf’ta keep these bags over our heads, otherwise that chicken from Providence might recognize us,” Malarkey confided to a cartoon cohort on October 8, 1954. In the context of the strip, the statement was a reference to a Rhode Island Red named Sis Boombah from the previous day’s comic, but it was also a clever slap at that Rhode Island newspaper that had tried to censor him.

Kelly’s Malarkey/McCarthy plot is just one of the many storylines in Evidence To The Contrary, which covers the syndicated Pogo comic strips from 1953 and 1954. The third volume in what Fantagraphics promises will be a dozen, Evidence To The Contrary gives us Kelly at his most self-assured, an artist whose facility with both caricature and dialect convinces us that an alligator named Albert really does enjoy nothing more than a good cigar; that an owl named Howland wears a gravity-defying wizard’s cap; and that the guilelessness of a likable possum named Pogo can be a surprisingly effective weapon against the fulminations of mere politicians.

See sample pages of Evidence To The Contrary at Wink.

Interview with the creators of Stripped, feature-length doc about comic strips [New Disruptors Podcast #68]

Dave Kellett and Fred Schroeder created the movie Stripped about the past, present, and future of comic strips and their creators. Dave is the creator and cartoonist of two webcomics titles, Sheldon and Drive, and the co-author of How To Make Webcomics. He is one of a small but growing group of webcomics artists who are self-sufficient. Fred is a veteran cinemographer, nominated for Best Cinematography at Sundance for his work on Four Sheets to the Wind. He has been shooting commercials for much of his career.

Together, they matched Fred's filmmaking skills with Dave's personal knowledge of the field and his contacts to create the first feature-length documentary on the topic, funded in part through two Kickstarter campaigns. They don't pull punches about the difficulties of being a comic-strip artist, but they show all the joy and love that goes into the work along with many potential bright lights already illuminating parts of the field and shining on the horizon.

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Baffling 1941 newspaper comic strip: "The Evening Argument"

On Facebook, cartoonist Michael Kupperman posted a collection of these baffling newspaper comics from 1941 called "The Evening Argument." He is at a loss to explain what is going on, as am I.

At first glance I thought these were a kind of "Goofus and Gallant" comic. So did several of the people commenting on Michael's post, including Anthony DeVito, who said, "Wait, I think I've got it: Aunt Het is supposed to be of strong moral fiber, while the women in Poor Pa are assholes. And then everyone argues all evening!"

James Urbaniak offers an appealing theory: "Separate strips published under a joint title because of their parallel styles and lack of humor," while Will Keen insists they are "discreet sex adverts."

We may never know the truth. Even so, I share cartoonist Mark Newgarden's sentiment: "My new favorite thing in the world." I would happily buy a book filled with these comics.

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Excellent animated comic strip about falling asleep in the car

Boulet's comic strip about his childhood experience of sleeping in the back of his parents car is beautifully enhanced by cycling animations. Good work! (Thanks, Matthew!)

Our Toyota Was Fantastic

1939 Gumps comic strip predicts modern drone warfare

[high res] Everyone knows about this comic book, which Dick Cheney read as a boy and later used as the basis of his foreign policy during the Bush administration. Here's another comic, from 1939, that predicts modern drone warfare. (Thanks, Randy Regier!)