Boing Boing 

Kubb, a minimalist wooden cube computer

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Such things usually come with beautiful and pointless greebling, but this one is a simple 5-inch cube made from three choices of finish: white ash, brown ash, and elm.

The Kubb has an i3 or i5 CPU, SSD storage, up to 16GB of RAM, and Intel HD onboard graphics. There are 4 USB ports, miniDisplay, miniHDMI, Wifi, Bluetooth, and an actual honest-to-God ethernet port. Bring 'yer own peripherals. (There are plenty of wooden ones on Amazon)

Prices start at 459 Euros for the cheapest model. It's already available in steel, too.

[via Uncrate]

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Watch Pixar co-founder's 1972 computer animations of face and hand

In 1972, Frederic Ira Parke, while a grad student at the University of Utah, created the first computer graphics animation, above, of a human face, and with fellow student (and Pixar co-founder) Ed Catmull made the groundbreaking computer animation, below, of a human hand.

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"The Computer Girls," 1967 Cosmopolitan magazine article on women working with technology

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"The Computer Girls," a 1967 Cosmopolitan piece about a weird new field, programming, that was dominated by women.

Previously: Miniskirts and Mainframes.

[via Clive Thompson]

34 weird vintage photos of women in tiny miniskirts at huge old computers

Vintage Photos of Mini-skirts Behind Computers (4)

Sex sells Big Iron. Attractive women wearing as little clothing as the decency of the day allows--this tool has been a constant one in the history of advertising, although hemlines over those same years have been anything but constant.

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Watch the trailer for new Steve Jobs documentary

"His stuff was beloved, but it wasn't that he was beloved."

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PC shipments decline sharply, again

oldcomputer"The death of the PC," writes Davey Alba, "has not been greatly exaggerated."

Research outfit Gartner tracked a 9.5 percent decline in shipments in the second quarter of this year compared to the same time a year ago, posting a tally of 68.4 million units. Meanwhile, researchers at IDC, which doesn’t count tablets in its report, calculated an 11.8 percent drop year-over-year to 66.1 million PCs shipped. To put that number into context, Apple said in its most recent earnings report that it had sold 61 million iPhones during the same quarter—and that’s just one smartphone from one (massively popular) company.

Can you guess which PC maker saw growth?

BBC finalizes Micro:bit computer design

_84082000_27d87eac-1e07-45dc-82a0-4419d387cb42To Britons of a certain age, the BBC Micro was a legendary 8-bit computer perfect for learning to code (and to play with between lessons). The public broadcaster's Micro Bit will be its spiritual sequel.

The tiny 4cm device has an ARM CPU, bluetooth and a USB port, through which it can be powered.

Uniquely, it has a series of 25 LED lights to help young children get instant results and appreciate its simple programmability, said to be a key differentiator between the Micro:bit and more elaborate devices such as the Raspberry Pi.

It also has an accelerometer, a motion detector, a compass, and and an array of inputs for more sensors to be attached. The wee board is 18 times faster than the original BBC Micro, which recently celebrated its 33rd birthday—and about 600 times lighter. The BBC will reportedly give a million Micro:bits to kids in the UK.

The IBM 1620, an affordable “scientific computer” from 1959.

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The IBM 1620 was released by IBM on October 21, 1959, touted as an inexpensive "scientific computer."

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WATCH: A lady goes insane trying to comprehend computers

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"Why is it that men understand computers so easily, but women don't?" After being driven mad by her technophobia, a hapless woman is visited by the spirit of Ada Lovelace, who patiently guides the woman back to her miserable reality.

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A farmhouse shrine to obsolete computers

York University's Jim Austin, a teacher of neural computing, has accumulated some 1,000 machines across 30 years of collecting obsolete computers. He keeps them in four sheds at the top of of a hill behind his farmhouse in Yorkshire.

The London Review of Books visited Austin and learned some fascinating things about hardware depreciation:

‘This IBM mainframe was $8.7 million in 1983,’ he told me when I went to see them. ‘Which in today’s money is $24 million. I mean, that’s astronomical. And they’re scrapped after four years. That’s it. Scrap.’ He points to another. ‘The Fujitsu supercomputer, I think it depreciated at £16,000 a week for three years. Then it was zero.’ Behind the IBM and the Fujitsu are more machines: DECs, Wangs. ‘I just take them all home. I preserve them. I just collect them, because I like them. And I’ve got the sheds, so I just put them in.’

The visit to Austin's shrines to obsolescence makes for almost poetic reading -- especially the story of 2005's 64th-fastest machine in the world, whose former owner traded away half its processor boards for chocolate bars.

Online activism and why the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act must die

Courts have appreciated that even distributed denial of service attacks can be legitimate form of public protest. Molly Sauter on the insane U.S. law used to criminalize them and other forms of online activism.Read the rest

Graphics chip commercial debunks moon landing conspiracies

NVIDIA made an interesting video to market their graphics processing tech by showing how it can be used to debunk conspiracy claims that the 1969 lunar landing was faked. (Thanks, Bob Pescovitz!)

Mellow electronica video shows what happens in your computer when you go right ahead and just spill juice all over it

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How It Works …. The Computer (Ladybird books, 1978)

Rob Beschizza found a copy of one of his favorite childhood books about computers. And now you can enjoy it too! Read the rest

Pesco on LSD, computers, and the counterculture

Above, video evidence of my short presentation "Just Say Know: A Cyberdelic History of the Future" at the recent Lift Conference 2014 in Geneva, Switzerland. Albert Hoffman first synthesized LSD in 1938 in Switzerland so this felt like the right set and setting to share stories about the intersection of psychedelic culture and computer technology from the 1960s to the present and beyond!

A midnight army at the dawn of the web

Leigh Alexander recalls her adventures working with porn spambots in the 1990s, and the strange mixture of nostalgia and disappointment that remains.Read the rest

How to: Shop for a computer in 1953

Ptak Science Books reprints a helpful article from the journal Computers and Automation, meant to help early computer shoppers make sure they're wisely spending their hundreds of thousands of dollars (in 1953 dollars, that is). You don't want to end up with a gigantic, room-sized piece of machinery that doesn't meet your needs or, worse, is a lemon.