Boing Boing 

Handmade Captain Marvel hoodie


This $60 handmade Captain Marvel hoodie (which has no hood!) is just one of many great superhero hoodies from Poland's Hoodie Dsz. (via The Mary Sue)

Canada reportedly caves, will extend copyright and yank James Bond out of the public domain

Michael Geist sez, "Last month, there were several Canadian media reports on how the work of Ian Fleming, the creator of James Bond, had entered the public domain. While this was oddly described as a 'copyright quirk', it was no quirk. The term of copyright in Canada (alongside TPP countries such as Japan and New Zealand) is presently life of the author plus an additional 50 years, a term that meets the international standard set by the Berne Convention. Those countries now appear to have caved to U.S. pressure as there are reports that they have agreed to extend to life plus 70 years as part of the Trans-Pacific Partnership."

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Free "freedom clip" turns off K-Cup DRM


Rogers Family Company Coffee and Tea is offering a free "Freedom Clip" that disables DRM in your new-model K-Cup machine, letting you use it with anyone's coffee pods.

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Patrick Costello: the deaf, copyfighting Merry God of Banjo


BB pal and deaf banjo-pickin' dude Patrick Costello writes, "The Washington Post just did a story about my work as a music teacher: ‘Merry God of banjo’"

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Rowlf the Dog covers Biz Markie's "Just a Friend"

It's an amazing piece of video editing/lip-syncing, right up there with Sesame Street Sure Shot.

How to fix copyright in two easy steps (and one hard one)

My new Locus column, A New Deal for Copyright, summarizes the argument in my book Information Doesn't Want to Be Free, and proposes a set of policy changes we could make that would help artists make money in the Internet age while decoupling copyright from Internet surveillance and censorship.

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Consumerist on Information Doesn't Want to Be Free


Consumerist's Kate Cox has turned in a long, excellent, in-depth review of my book Information Doesn't Want to Be Free, really nailing the book's thesis. Namely, that extremist copyright laws don't just mess up artists, but actually endanger all our privacy, freedom and whole digital lives.

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They put a Pirate Party MEP in charge of EU copyright reform: you won't believe awesomesauce that followed


Julia Reda, the sharp-as-a-tack Member of the European Parliament for the German Pirate Party, has just tendered her draft report on copyright reform in the EU. It is full of amazingly sensible suggestions.

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License Expired: an unauthorized James Bond anthology

Now that the James Bond novels and character have entered the public domain in most of the world (but not the USA), David Nickle and Madeline Ashby teamed up to edit "License Expired," an anthology of unauthorized 007 stories for the Canadian press Chizine.

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Eradicate DRM within a decade!

The Electronic Frontier Foundation's Apollo 1201 will target it with code, law, norms and markets.Read the rest

I Think You'll Find It's a Bit More Complicated Than That

Over the past decade, pharma-fighting Dr Ben Goldacre has written more than 500,000 words of fearlessly combative science journalism.Read the rest

Game Boy Pokemon mugs


Mug Emporium's $12 Game Boy Pokemon mugs come with your choice of Pokemon, though, one supposes, you should really catch them all. (via Geeky Merch)

Electroswing Ella Fitzgerald's "Air Mail Special"

The Club Des Belugas Remix of Ella Fitzgerald's classic Air Mail Special turns one of the greatest scat tunes of all time into an amazing electro-swing song, with an unexpectedly fitting rhumba beat.

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X-Wing fighter rocker


Steve Coupe, a woodworker in New Zealand, created this wonderful children's rocker in the shape of an X-Wing fighter, complete with an R2-D2, working for about 40 hours to complete the piece for a charity auction to benefit a children's hospital.

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Apple won't let EFF release a DRM-free app


EFF has released its mobile app to help people join in important, timely struggles, but you can't get it for your Iphone or Ipad, because Apple insists that EFF use DRM, and this is contrary to everything it stands for.

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Universal wants to take away prisoners' mixtapes


They're suing a group that sends care-packages to prisoners that include mixtapes featuring funk, soul and hiphop artists.

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Adventure Time hand towels


Your hands will be drier and your heart will sing: $13 on Etsy, also available in Kirby, Finn, and Captain Kirk. (via Geeky Merch)

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Batca[v|k]e


Mike's Amazing Cakes (previously) of Redmond, WA made this detailed, wildly improbable Batcave cake for a client, complete with a cake Adam-West-era Batmobile.

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Digital rights stickers


Gavriel designed a digital-freedom-themed sticker pack for Discordia Culture; 25% of proceeds from which go to EFF. (Thanks, Gavriel!)

Downpour.com: audiobooks without the DRM


I love audiobooks, but I hate DRM (actually, I think it's an existential threat to humanity), and since Audible requires all its books to be sold with DRM (even when the publishers object), that's left me with limited options -- until 2014, when I discovered Downpour.

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Happy Public Domain Day: here are the works that copyright extension stole from you in 2015


Jennifer Jenkins writes, "What could have been entering the public domain in the US on January 1, 2015? Under the law that existed until 1978 -- Works from 1958. The films 'Attack of the 50 Foot Woman,' 'Cat on a Hot Tin Roof,' and 'Gigi,' the books 'Our Man in Havana,' 'The Once and Future King,' and 'Things Fall Apart,' the songs 'All I Have to Do Is Dream' and 'Yakety Yak,' and more -- What is entering the public domain this January 1? Not a single published work."

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Sony pirated K-pop anthem in The Interview

Yoon Mi Rae is set to sue Sony over the inclusion of her song "Touch Love" in The Interview, which, she says, Sony failed to license for the film.

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War on General Purpose Computers is the difference between utopia and dystopia


My Wired op-ed, How Laws Restricting Tech Actually Expose Us to Greater Harm, warns that we've learned the wrong lesson from the DRM wars: we've legitimized the idea that we can and should design computers to disobey their owners and hide their operations from them in order to solve our problems (and that we should protect this design decision by making it a felony to disclose flaws in devices, lest these flaws be used to jailbreak them).

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Pfizer threatens pharmacists, doctors if they take its name in vain


Pfizer's patent on pregabalin -- an anti-epilepsy med -- expires this year, but there's another patent on using the public domain drug to treat neuropathic pain; in a shocking letter to UK doctors, the pharma giant warns of dire consequences should medical professionals dare to prescribe the generic for the patented use.

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Jailbreaking your cat litter: welcome to the Internet of Feudal Things


Jorge loves his Catgenie automated cat-litter tray, but doesn't love spending $350/year on "Sanisolution" (perfumed gunk that makes the litter stick to his cats' feet and gets tracked all over his apartment), but he discovered that the manufacturer uses DRM to stop him from filling the empty Sanisolution reservoir with water.

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Star Wars and Bat-signal crayons


Crayontastik melts down "reputable brand crayons" and recasts them in new forms, like this Star Wars set and these Bat-signal crayons.

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Kodachrome home-movie of a Long Beach fast food joint in 1952

Archivist Rick Prelinger sez, "I'm sure Beany's Hamburgers weren't the healthiest food, but this eight-minute home movie from Prelinger Archives takes us inside a fast-food joint from the Korean War era. Filmed in Long Beach, California right across from the Circle Drive-In, this film shows cooks, customers and classic cars in loving detail."

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EFF's copyfighter's crossword


EFF's annual crossword puzzle is a roundup of news stories from the world of digital civil liberties from 2014. Can you get 'em all without googling?

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Telcos' anti-Net Neutrality argument may let the MPAA destroy DNS


The telcos' ongoing battle against Net Neutrality have led them to make a lot of silly legalistic arguments, but one in particular has opened the whole Internet to grave danger from a legal attack from the entertainment industry, which may finally realize its longstanding goal of subverting DNS to help it censor sites it dislikes, even if it makes life much easier for thieves and spies who use DNS tricks to rob and surveil.

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Musical time-machine to Walt Disney World in the late 1970s


The amazing Foxxfur has spent 3.5 years assembling a new installment in her "Musical Souvenir of Walt Disney World" series, pulling together audio rarities from WDW in the late 1970s to create a six-hour soundscape that faithfully recreates the incidental music, cast member spiels, and ride narration from one of the golden ages of Disney themeparks.

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