Dungeon crafting red herrings for Frostgrave's Ulterior Motives expansion

Did you know that there's such a thing as "dungeon crafting?" I didn't, until recently. There are a growing number of YouTube channels dedicated to teaching viewers how to craft all manner of terrain and building components to be used in Dungeons and Dragons and other roleplaying and tabletop games.

My friend, Make: and Geek Dad contributor Jim Kelly, has recently launched a new dungeon crafting channel called Game Terrain Engineering. So far, he has posted videos for such projects as making towers, tombs, crypts, columns and doors, and my favorite, how to make monuments to your fallen D&D characters!

In the latest episode (above), Jim gets to work on creating a set of red herring playing pieces for his (and my) current favorite game, Frostgrave (read my WINK review of Frostgrave here). Osprey Games, makers of Frostgrave, have just released an awesome new expansion for the game, a deck of 40 cards called Ulterior Motives. These cards contain special game objectives that players draw before beginning play. I love this game mechanic of adding individual player objectives to an existing game via a deck of cards. Frostgrave is not an RPG, it's a narrative fantasy skirmish wargame. Adding these individual motives helps to bring more play-depth and narrative flavor to the game.

Some of the objectives in the Ulterior Motives pack are revealed right when the card is drawn. Others remain secret until you make your move as indicated on the card. To get other players off the stink of what you're up to, there are a series of red herring terrain pieces that are called for (a statue, a zombie, a pit, a portal, a sarcophagus, a trap door, an arcane disk, and a runic stone). Read the rest

Ulna-Stina Wikander: a Swedish artist who cross-stitches household objects and makes bracelets out of toy cars

Ulna-Stina Wikander's many pieces include a wide variety of household objects (chairs, mirrors, etc) covered in meticulous cross-stitched fabric; bracelets and belts made from toy cars, lamps made from framed slot-car racetracks, and a lively miscellany of other pieces. Alas, her Flash-based site makes it impossible to link directly to my favorites (and I had to install the Flash plugin just to see it!), but it's well worth your time to go looking. (via Crazy Abalone) Read the rest

Washi masking tape in 20 colors

The MT Washi Masking Tapes come in 20 colors for $16.35, 10 meters of each color, with hundreds of positive reviews from crafters and customizers (caveat: this is "decorating" tape, and has limited use for e.g. sticking things up on walls). (via Fun Finds) Read the rest

Crafting with Feminism: 25 Girl-Powered Projects to Smash the Patriarchy

Today sees the publication of Bonnie Burton's (previously) long-awaited new book, Crafting with Feminism: 25 Girl-Powered Projects to Smash the Patriarchy. Read the rest

Fantastic hand-crocheted E.T. costume for 2-year-old

Stephanie Pokorny freehand crocheted this out-of-this-world E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial costume for her son Jack, age 2! The project took her four days.

"He is free handed and made with no pattern," she said. "I literally just tried it on him as I created and stopped when it fit right!"

"Grab a Phone, ET needs to call home! New “HumanGurumi!”" (Crochetverse) Read the rest

Bonnie Burton's next book: "Crafting with Feminism: 25 Girl-Powered Projects to Smash the Patriarchy"

Bonnie Burton (previously) is a favorite around these parts, thanks both to her keen eye for awesomeness, and her next book, Crafting with Feminism: 25 Girl-Powered Projects to Smash the Patriarchy (Oct 18), looks like a big ole ball of perfect. (with a foreword by Felicia! Day! (never weird!)) Read the rest

Make your own geometrical papercraft mask

Wintercroft's Etsy storefront is full of beautiful, downloadable plans for making geometrical animal- and horror-masks from recycled cardboard boxes. It's a great, simple way to make the perfect Hallowe'en costume. Read the rest

Knitted anatomical dissections: readymade or DIY

We've featured the lovely knitted dissections of Aknitomy before (previously), but its proprietor, Emily Stoneking, keeps on turning out whimisico-scientific knitted fancies that please the eye and tickle the mind. It's not just her classic knitted dissections of frogs, fetal pigs, bats, worms (surprisingly affordable!), and even Easter bunnies -- she's also selling all her patterns, and even kits! Read the rest

Knitting as computation

K2G2 -- a wiki for "krafty knerds and geek girls" -- has a marvellous series of posts about "Computational Craft" through which traditional crafting practices, like knitting, are analyzed through the lens of computer science. The most recent post, A Computational Model of Knitting, point out the amazing parallels between knitting and computing, with knitting needles performing stack and dequeue operations, "While straight needles with caps store and retrieve their stitches according to the principle of LIFO (first in - last out), double pointed and circular needles additionally implement the functions of a queue or FIFO (first in – first out), effectively forming a double ended queue, also known as dequeue." Read the rest

Jane's cat made from cat hair

My 10-year-old daughter has been brushing our three cats and saving their hair in a plastic bag. She wanted to be ready when her copy of Crafting With Cat Hair arrived. On Sunday morning, she made her first cat hair project - a little cat. My older daughter had a sneezing fit, so Jane will have to complete the other projects from the book outside.

Crafting With Cat Hair Read the rest

TV and TV dinner made from felt

Andrew Salomone of Craft says: "Fiber artist LeBrie Rich of Penfelt created this amazing felted TV diner (complete with TV) using a combination of commercial wool felt with needle and wet felting."

I would've preferred the TV to be showing Land of the Giants instead of a football game, but I won't complain.

Felted TV Diner Read the rest

US Olympic Committee says sorry to knitters whom it claimed "denigrated" the games

The US Olympic Committee has apologized for describing the knitters' Ravelympics as "denigrating" to real athletes. Ravelympics are an activity on Ravelry, a community for knitters, in which members compete to complete knitting projects while watching Olympic events, producing hybrids like the "afghan marathon" and "scarf hockey." The Olympic Committee, worried that they will have a hard time raising millions for giant, evil companies like Dow Chemicals if knitters are allowed to share patterns that include the Olympic rings, sent a grossly insulting legal threat to the knitters of Ravelry:

We believe using the name "Ravelympics" for a competition that involves an afghan marathon, scarf hockey and sweater triathlon, among others, tends to denigrate the true nature of the Olympic Games. In a sense, it is disrespectful to our country's finest athletes and fails to recognize or appreciate their hard work.

After a lot of hue and cry, the USOC said sorry, and suggested that knitters could give away the stuff they make to the USOC.

Jun 21 Statement from USOC Spokesperson Patrick Sandusky (Thanks, Gladys!) Read the rest

Crocheted cyclops

Crochet costumer Veronica Knight has topped herself with this crocheted cyclops outfit. This puts the Z in ZOMG.

Crocheted Cyclops Costume Read the rest

Hello Kitty toddler trousers knitting pattern

Etsy seller Mazter has created a knitting pattern for these teeth-achingly cute Hello Kitty toddler trousers and is accepting pre-sales. It's available in Norwegian and English.

Knitting pattern - Kitty pants (via Craft) Read the rest

Keep Calm and Carry Yarn

A fine newcomer to the field of remixes of the WWII British "KEEP CALM AND CARRY ON" posters, from Etsy seller jenniegee.

Keep Calm and Carry Yarn poster Previously:GET EXCITED AND MAKE THINGS: a "Keep calm and carry on ... Keep Calm and Carry On: sage advice from a sane wartime government ... "Get Excited and Make Things" shirt at Howies, Carnaby St. London ... Read the rest