Boing Boing 

Make super cute fabric pins with Sukie Button Factory

I’m 18 and still have so much fun sitting at my kitchen table doing arts and crafts. One of my favorite craft kits I own is an awesome and simple pin-making kit called the Sukie Button Factory. This kit makes it easy to create adorable fabric-covered pins. It comes with 25 pin backs and fronts, fabric with many different cute and colorful designs, a button-covering mold and pusher, a fun zine-like instruction book, and a template to help you cut the fabric (I added felt to my kit, which I’m going to experiment with). All you have to do is cut out the circle of fabric that you like and attach it to the button and pin using the mold and pusher. It’s super easy, fun, and addictive. Of course you can use your own fabric when making the pins. The finished pins can be attached to birthday cards, on clothes, backpacks, shoes, and anything else you can think of.

Sukie Button Factory
by Chronicle
Ages 9 and up, makes 25 pins
$12 Buy a copy on Amazon

Video: HOWTO make a 3D origami Darth Vader

Origami enthusiasts have created a number of small foldable units that can then be assembled into all kinds of 3-D shapes, like this Darth Vader.

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DIY Underlit LED Skirt

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Buy a basket and keep a girl in school

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The Kalebo village in North Eastern Ghana isn't fertile enough for extensive agriculture. Instead, the Kalbeo Women's Trading Group create traditional cloth, pottery and other handicrafts such as this beautifully handwoven Bolga basket.

The Bolga baskets are made using local grasses and help supplement their incomes. This money, along with micro loans from CENSUDI, help send young women to school. Purchasing a Bolga basket can help get a young woman an education and out of a lifetime of poverty.

Check out their Facebook page.

Hand-craft your own beautiful sweet potato dolls

sweet-potato-dolls25 easy-to-staple projects!

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Excellent mini faux-deer head from Perler Beads

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I know what my kids will be making me after school today.

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Show off your painted miniatures!

miniature My nephew, Joshua Smith, is graduating high school this week and will soon be off to the U.S. Coast Guard. In his free time, he's learning to painstakingly paint miniatures, and is starting to get pretty good! Here's a current WIP. Show us your own best work, for great justice.

Pokemon ghosts are still fashionable, still spooky

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If you have a fond memory for Pokemon games, you'll remember that Lavender Town tends to be where all the ghost stories can be found. Somewhat famously, Lavender Town is also the source of a great work of creepypasta—now it is the inspiration for a great handmade outfit.

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I like big books and I cannot lie embroidery


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Almost 150 quilts you won’t find on Pinterest

A micro-review, in bullet points:

1. Almost 150 quilts you won’t find on Pinterest.

2. The essays are good.

3. When seeking visual pleasure and inspiration, a curated and finite set (like a book) can be more useful than an infinite set (like the internet).

Slightly more detail, if you’re still on the fence:

This book is not about formal, precision-pieced quilts but rather represents the growing interest in the improvisational and often surprising “everyday” quilts. Those depicted here are of the vintage (rather than antique) era. Most are by unknown makers. Collector Roderick Kiracofe has commissioned ten essays to offer context for the anonymous textiles.

Quilt historian Janneken Smucker smacks down the “myth of the scrap bag quilt.” Natalie Chanin (of Alabama Chanin) describes the class messaging of whole cloth vs. patchwork quilts when she grew up in the South. Texas quiltmaker Sherry Ann Bryrd explains the distinction between “precision”, “M-provisational” and “throw together” as quilting “languages” with different functions. Textile curator Amelia Peck writes about the challenge of curating anonymous work for an institutional collection. All worth reading. But mostly it’s about the pictures.

Unconventional & Unexpected: American Quilts Below the Radar 1950-2000, by Roderick Kiracofe

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