Partially nude dead Briton with cold-cuts on his buttocks and his penis in a tuna can found tied up outside Malaga airport


No one is sure how 51 year old British man ended up dead, pantsless, tied to a bench in front of the Malaga airport with luncheon meat on his buttocks and his penis in a can of tuna fish. Read the rest

When Californians vote on legal weed, they'll also vote on wiping millions of arrest records


Despite the fact that minor possession has been a misdemeanor since 1976 (and medical weed has been legal since 1996) between 15,000 and 20,000 Californians are arrested every year for marijuana offenses. Read the rest

Woman with skull on stick leads police to corpse


A woman walking around Sacramento with a skull on a stick led police to a homeless encampment where she found the cranium. Apparently someone spotted the woman marching around with the skull and called police. After police found the woman at an abandoned house, she took them to the area where they located the body.

"A call like this is not something that happens every day," Sacramento police Sgt. Bryce Heinlein told Fox 40. "We hope we can get down to the bottom of what caused this person to become deceased." Read the rest

Crowdfunding a bike-lock that squirts vomit-inducing antipersonnel gas when cut


The Skunklock is a $109 crowdfunded gadget that contains pressurized vomit-inducing gas the creators call "Formula D_1," and which is intended to induce immediate vomiting when inhaled, as well as difficulty breathing, "A lot of similar symptoms to pepper spray." Read the rest

President Nixon's housekeeper hypnotized into shoplifting

In 1971, Shirley Cromartie, a housekeeper for President Richard Nixon at his Key Biscayne retreat, was arrested for shoplifting four dresses. According to Cromartie, she was hypnotically coerced into the theft by a young woman who approached her, "released a jasmine-like scent from her left hand" to told her "to take the dresses former children."

Psychiatrist Dr. Albert Maslow who examined Cromartie said he "believed she was telling the truth."

Clip below of a Philadelphia Inquirer article from October 23, 1971. More at Weird Universe.

Read the rest

Islamophobic terrorist cell planned a "bloodbath" in Kansas, wanted to kill Muslim babies


The Department of Justice has announced that it has arrested three Kansas men who called themselves "Crusaders" and planned "a bloodbath" in an apartment complex where many Somali people lived, which was to including bombings followed by house-to-house shootings sparing no one, "not even babies." Read the rest

Judge throws off robe, kicks ass in court after defendant struggles with officer


His name is McBain. Judge McBain. If you're a walking protection order violation trying to intimidate your victim in court, God will not save you from the contempt citations, or indeed the whirling limbs, of Judge McBain.

A court officer seen in the video told that as he tried to take Larson into custody, the defendant “tensed up” and tried to fight him. Larson and the officer, identified by as Jared Schultz, struggled as Larson continued to point and talk to the woman.

“Tell me to leave you alone!” he said. “Tell him right now!”

“Tase his a– right now!” McBain shouted, as he threw off his judge’s robe, ran over to the two men and then physically helped pin Larson to the ground. Throughout the scuffle, Larson is heard cursing periodically.

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Wells Fargo's new CEO previously denied that the bank's sales culture had any problems


Yesterday, Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf announced his "early retirement" from the scandal-haunted company, with the CEO seat being filled by former COO Tim Sloan. Read the rest

Icelandic Supreme Court: all nine top bankers are guilty of market manipulation


All nine of the top Icelandic bankers from the Kaupþing market manipulation case have been found guilty by the country's Supreme Court, which reversed the district court that had acquitted two of the defendants last year. Read the rest

When "reputation management" becomes perjury, forgery and fraud against America's federal courts


If you want to get a piece of information removed from the internet, there are few tools more powerful that a court judgment saying that it is defamatory. A judgment like that will get Google to de-index the result and frighten most web-hosts into getting rid of it. So it follows that the sleaziest end of the "reputation management" industry has occupied itself with securing these court orders at high volumes and low costs. Read the rest

Twice, Sacramento cops tried to run down mentally ill man, then they shot him 14 times


Twice, Sacramento police Randy Lozoya and John Tennis tried to run down Joseph Mann with their cruiser, saying "Fuck this guy. I’m going to hit him" and "OK, go for it. Go for it," before shooting him 14 times. Read the rest

The Wells Fargo fraud came to light because of union organizers


Though Wells Fargo had been pressuring its employees to commit fraud since 1998, firing those who couldn't make quota, as well as the whistleblowers who came forward to report the fraud, it wasn't until the Committee for Better Banks launched a unionization drive to organize retail banking workers against punitive sales quotas that the crimes came to light. Read the rest

Petition: make the FBI explain why they didn't bring criminal charges against bank execs


Last month, Senator Elizabeth Warren published an open letter to FBI director James Comey observing that, in revealing details of its investigation into the Clinton email scandal, the Bureau had seemingly abandoned its longstanding policy of not sharing its deliberations, meaning that there was no longer any reason to keep secret its reasoning for not bringing criminal charges against the bankers who did trillions of dollars' worth of damage to the world economy, sparking wars, starvation, and personal ruin for millions of people. Read the rest

Wells Fargo started demanding fraud of its employees in 1998; Illinois cuts Wells off from state business


Wells Fargo made a habit of firing employees who didn't make unrealistic sales targets, turning a blind eye to the fraud they had to commit in order to keep their jobs (and firing the whistleblowers who reported the fraud). Read the rest

Hundreds of cops misuse databases yearly, says report


An investigation by the Associated Press found 675 police officers were jailed or disciplined for misusing police databases from 2013 to 2015, and that's just the ones who were caught.

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State of California imposes 12-months' worth of sanctions on Wells Fargo


Following from Wells Fargo's 2,000,000-account fraud against its own customers -- part of a decade-old pattern -- the state of California has imposed sanctions on the bank, freezing it out of bond issues, brokerage business, and suspending all investment in Wells Fargo-issued securities. Read the rest

Ex-Wells employees who were fired for NOT committing fraud launch $2.6B lawsuit


When four named whistleblowers came forward to reveal that they'd been illegally fired from Wells Fargo for reporting that the company was experiencing widespread fraud, it was deja vu all over again: Wells also punished whistleblowers who sounded the alarm during the subprime crisis, and was thus so totally compromised that they needed a $36B taxpayer bailout. Read the rest

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