Horse-riding woman attempts to burglarize store

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Christine Saunders, 45, of DeKalb County, Alabama was arrested after allegedly stealing merchandise from a store, drunkenly, before she could escape using her getaway vehicle, a stolen horse (AL.com).

Someone stole an Elvis scarecrow

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Missing: an Elvis scarecrow displayed as part of a scarecrow festival in the village of Starcross, England.

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Colorado's booming legal weed economy


It's not just the $10M in taxes the state's earned in four months -- it's also the $12-40M in law enforcement savings from not busting and imprisoning pot smokers.

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ISPs sue UK spies over hack-attacks


ISPs in US, UK, Netherlands and South Korea are suing the UK spy agency GCHQ over its illegal attacks on their networks in the course of conducting surveillance.

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Cyber-crooks turn to Bitcoin extortion


Security journalist Brian Krebs documents a string of escalating extortion crimes perpetrated with help from the net, and proposes that the growth of extortion as a tactic preferred over traditional identity theft and botnetting is driven by Bitcoin, which provides a safe way for crooks to get payouts from their victims.

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Cops bust cybercrook who sent heroin to Brian Krebs

Sergei "Fly" Vovnenko, a Russo-Ukrainian cybercrook who stalked and harassed security journalist Brian Krebs -- at one point conspiring to get him arrested by sending him heroin via the Silk Road -- has been arrested. According to Krebs, Vovnenko was a prolific credit-card crook, specializing in dumps of stolen Italian credit-card numbers, and faces charges in Italy and the USA. Krebs documents how Vovnenko's identity came to light because he installed a keylogger on his own wife's computer, which subsequently leaked her real name, which led to him.

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Oakland to decriminalize pinball

Pinball Flippers Demolition Man

Yes, pinball is illegal in Oakland, California. But this week, the 80-year-old law, tied to anti-gambling ordinances, will be reversed.

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Gangs run mass-scale romance cons with phished dating-site logins


Netcraft reports on a rising tide of automated phishing deployed against online dating sites; crooks steal accounts, strike up romantic relationships with their victims, then run 419-style cons on them. Using dating sites as part of a con isn't new, but using stolen accounts to do it is, especially at scale. The phishing kits are easy to deploy and are used to capture credentials for dating sites including match.com, Christian Mingle, POF (PlentyOfFish), eHarmony, Chemistry.com, SeniorPeopleMeet, Zoosk and Lavalife. Interestingly, the phishing kits found in the wild now disproportionately seek logins for dating sites, as compared to banking sites and other traditional fraud targets.

Criminals launch mass phishing attacks against online dating sites [Paul Mutton/Netcraft]

(via /.)

(Image: ...And Then Sometimes Valentine's Day Sucks!, Jackie, CC-BY)

Thai shrimp industry runs on brutal slavery and murder


A blockbuster investigative report in The Guardian reveals that the Thai shrimp/prawn fishing industry is powered by a brutal system of slavery through which trafficked workers are bought and sold by captains who starve, beat and murder them in sadistic displays intended to inspire fear in the remaining workforce. The major companies who import Thai prawns, like CP Foods, and their customers, which includes most major grocery stores, admit that there is a problem, but they do not conduct audits that go "all the way to the end of the supply chain." An anonymous Thai government spokesman claims that the problem could be easily dealt with, but there is no political will to do so.

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Criminal website selling thousands of credit cards hijacked from PF Chang's diners


In an echo of the massive breach of credit-card numbers from Target, credit-card numbers from thousands of PF Chang's customers who used their cards at the restaurant between March and May 2014 are being sold on the criminal underground. Rescator, the criminal selling the PF Chang's customers' card, has branded his product "Ronald Reagan", and offers cards at different prices based on whether they're regular, gold or platinum cards.

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Phoenix Jones conducts fitness-based Seattle superhero purge


Seattle superhero Phoenix Jones (previously) has purged the membership of Rain City Superheroes, dissolving and reforming the superhero group with new, stringent membership requirements, including the ability to do five pull-ups and 25 sit-ups in two minutes.

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Matt Taibbi's The Divide: incandescent indictment of the American justice-gap

Matt Taibbi’s
The Divide: American Injustice in the Age of the Wealth Gap
is a scorching, brilliant, incandescent indictment of the widening gap in how American justice treats the rich and the poor. Taibbi’s spectacular financial reporting for Rolling Stone set him out as the best running commentator on the financial crisis and its crimes, and The Divide — beautifully illustrated by Molly Crabapple — shows that at full length, he’s even better. Cory Doctorow reviews The Divide.

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Appeals court nukes the copyright troll business-model

Yesterday, a federal judge in the DC circuit court of appeals handed Prenda law -- the most loathed and evil porno copyright trolls in the business -- its own ass on a plate, and struck a blow against copyright trolling everywhere. The Electronic Frontier Foundation's Mitch Stoltz has a deep dive into the case, which EFF participated in.

Prenda (previously) is one of the leaders in the shady practice of accusing people of downloading pornographic films with embarrassing titles and then demanding money in exchange for not filing a lawsuit against them, using the threat of having your name associated with "Anal Invaders XII" in public records forever as a lever to get you to settle even if you've done nothing wrong. In AF Holdings v. Does 1-1058, Judge Tatel struck an important blow against this practice by ruling that trolls have to file cases in the same jurisdiction as their victims in order to get court orders to reveal the victims' names and addresses, without which the cases cannot proceed. But filing cases in the correct jurisdiction will likely cost more than the average blackmail payment that Prenda extorts from its victims, making the whole thing into a losing business.

The court also held that merely being accused of having, at some point, participated in a Bittorrent swarm does not join you with everyone else who ever joins that swarm, and that there is only joint liability for people who download from one another, as part of the same swarm at the same time. This is the first-ever federal ruling on copyright trolling's most evil practices, and it represents a major victory for the good guys.

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Profile of a courtroom sketch artist

Gary Myrick has been a courtroom sketch artist for 40 years and his profession is dying; above, a New York Times video profile of Myrick.