I Will Always Remember You

Top Elephant Image

The power of simple animation can be overwhelming. This film, I Will Always Remember You by Hugo Guinness, done for The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust, is shattering.

The technique used by artist Hugo Guinness appears to be a tribute to Windsor McKay’s Gertie the Dinosaur, the first animated character (in 1914) generally credited as having a personality. It is used here not for whimsy, but artfully to devastating effect. So many emotions conveyed by so few lines.

Sometimes the simplest things are the most effective.

For a mere $50, you can foster a young elephant.

From The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust:

Every orphan of poaching once had a family. As Hugo Guinness’ moving animation shows, at our Nursery, we offer hope, a future and a second chance at life to victims of the ivory trade. This is their story.

‪#‎RememberMe‬ - Please share this film far and wide! Survivors, like the orphan elephant in the film, have the opportunity to not only live, but to go on and start their own families back in the wild.

Want to be a part of their future? Foster an orphaned baby elephant in our care.

Our biggest thanks to acclaimed artist Hugo Guinness, Allegra Pilkington and Luisa Crosbie for creating such a powerful animation, with original music by Joe Trapanese and support from J. Crew.

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Kitten pops a water balloon in slow motion

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See the extended director's cut gif here. Read the rest

How to make your own cat scratching posts

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Mr. Homegrown shows how to make a cat scratching post from some rope and lumber. He writes, 'I’m so satisfied with the results that I’m thinking about creating a integrated cat scratcher/USB charging station/cat perch using a twisty tree branch. I know, that sounds like a bad idea, but as Marshall McLuhan once said, “If you don’t like that idea I’ve got others.'" Read the rest

Monkeys make surprisingly terrible random-number generators

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Back in 2002, artists at England's Plymouth University teamed up with Paignton Zoo to see if monkeys could write Shakespeare. Read the rest

Kitten fails to impress tortoise

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[via] Read the rest

Tender arthropod: mama centipede cradles her young

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Ivealreadyreddit, who's working in Thailand, posted this picture of a tropical centipede cradling her newly hatched babies. Dawwww. Read the rest

That time the DoD paid Duke U $335K to investigate ESP in dogs. Yes, dogs.

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Michael from Muckrock writes, "Government research often pushes the boundaries between science and science fiction. Today, the proud bearer of that mantle is often DARPA, experimenting with robots, cybernetics, and more. But in the sixties, during the height of the Cold War, this research often went into more fantastical realms, even exploring whether ExtraSensory Perception (ESP) was possible. Thanks to FOIA, MuckRock looks back on the paranormal history of American surveillance." Read the rest

How the National Reconnaissance Office came to choose a sinister, planet-devouring octopus for a logo

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Michael from Muckrock writes, "When the National Reconnaissance Office (NRO) announced the upcoming launch of their NROL-39 mission back in December 2013, they didn't get quite the response they hoped. That might have had something to do with the mission logo being a gigantic octopus devouring the Earth. Researcher Runa Sandvik wanted to know who approved this and why, so she filed a Freedom of Information Act with the NRO for the development materials that went into the logo. A few months later, the NRO delivered." Read the rest

Kickstarting an unbelievably cute otter-shaped tea-steeper

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The otter perches on your teacup's rim while the tea steeps, staring adorably at you while it goes. Read the rest

The heaviest, sturdiest cat litter scoop

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Cool Tools reader Joe Stirt recommended this large cat litter scoop. I bought one, because the little plastic scoop I’d been using for a couple of years had gotten flimsy from use and would often buckle at the handle. This one is made from cast aluminum and will never bend. It easily shaves hardened clumps of litter from that litter box that would cause a plastic scoop to fold in half. It’s actually a beautiful looking tool, too. If Raymond Loewy designed a scoop, it would look like this (maybe the handle wouldn’t be covered with textured plastic). Cleaning cat litter is an unpleasant daily chore for me, but the DuraScoop makes it much less unpleasant. I’m surprised it is only $13. It’s easily worth three times the price. Read the rest

Map of power outages caused by squirrels

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Cyber Squirrel 1 is a Google-powered map that tracks power outages caused by small animals. Occasionally buzzards cause some chaos, but it is mostly the fault of squirrels. Pictured above is the map for December, 2015.

Previously on Boing Boing:

Squirrels and raccoons attack, Northern California reels under onslaught Read the rest

This is the best $2 I've spent on a cat toy

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The Cat Dancer is a 30-inch piece of wire with some little cardboard cylinders on the end. My cats go crazy for it. I stuck it on the wall with the adhesive mount, but I ended up taking it off so I could hold it and play directly with my cats. That way they won't get bored as quickly. Now they start meowing when they see me take it out of the drawer. It's $2 on Amazon. Read the rest

The raccoon learned not to dunk cotton candy in water

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View post on imgur.com

A couple of days ago I posted a video of a raccoon that dipped a block of cotton candy in water and became confused when it dissolved instantly. What I didn't know is that the video was part of a longer video that shows that the raccoon learned on the third time not to dip cotton candy in water. Read the rest

Taxidermy "gooseneck" lamp

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Sculptor Sebastian ErraZuriz rescued a damaged stuffed goose from a taxidermy museum's trash and turned it into a "gooseneck" lamp.

Rescued from the trashcan of an old taxidermy museum, the taxidermy bird with a broken neck get’s given a new life as and reconstructed to become an iconic classic. The Duck Lamp by New York based artist and designer Sebastian ErraZuriz is an eerie, yet funny and beautiful object that explores the borders between sculptural and functional of both art and design.

DUCK LAMP II [Sebastian ErraZuriz]

(via Neatorama) Read the rest

Raccoon tries to wash cotton candy, but it dissolves instantly

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This raccoon found a chunk of cotton candy. When the animal dipped the cotton candy into a puddle to wet it, the chunk dissolved, and the raccoon was like, wtf?

Why do raccoons dip their food into water? It's not to clean it, and it is not to soften it. How Stuff Work says raccoons wet their food as a way to give them "a more vivid tactile experience and precise information about what they're about to eat." Read the rest

Some are upset by a photo of a dog with a slice of ham on its face

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Stephen Roseman posted this photo of his dog with a slice of ham on its face to Facebook on December 23, with the comment:

This poor dog was badly burned and disfigured trying to save his family from a house fire

One like = one prayer

One share = ten prayers

The post has gotten over 100,000 shares on Facebook. Some people apparently did not understand that Roseman was kidding, and prayed for the dog. When people learned that the dog was not injured, some thought it was funny and others became upset.

Buzzfeed attempted to contact Roseman to get his comment on the uproar, but he appears to be in Portugal on vacation. (function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "//connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.3"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs);}(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk'));

This poor dog was badly burned and disfigured trying to save his family from a house fireOne like = one prayerOne share = ten prayers

Posted by Stephen Roseman on Wednesday, December 23, 2015
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What can animals read from human faces?

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A smile can speak a thousand words but those words may remain in the wilderness if the recipient doesn’t speak human. Of course animals have many ways in which to interpret our emotions and intentions. They can listen to our voices, smell our bodily chemicals, touch us with their paws, hands and claws, taste us with their overworked tongues and they can see us with observant eyes.

They can see us.

This final sense is quite curious when we are thinking about animals watching us. What is it they are actually seeing? We know they understand many forms of visible body language but what about our faces? Is there any evidence they understand anything from our facial expressions and if there is, what would they be basing their understanding on? Is there anything we could do to aid their understanding of our facial expressions? Racing ahead, what would any inter-species facial communication between humans and animals mean for possible future meetings with extra-terrestrials?

Let’s begin by looking at some of the evidence available. In 2004, the Journal of Comparative Psychology published the results of a study that showed dolphins instinctively comprehend human gazing to the extent that they understand the difference between what the study called static gazing and dynamic gazing. Static gazing being an idle stare with no action required and dynamic gazing meaning a gaze that prompted the dolphins to interact with an object. No verbal commands or prior training were needed for the dolphins to comprehend the difference. Read the rest

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