Bee pulls nail out of brick wall

Screen Shot 2016-05-02 at 10.07.19 AM

Granted, the nail was loose, but it is remarkable to see a bee work it out of the hole. Two questions: what was the nail doing in the hole in the first place, and why was the bee so intent on getting it out?

[via] Read the rest

Lemur demands backrub

Screen Shot 2016-04-29 at 9.12.57 AM

Before humans descended on the island of Madagascar there was a species of lemur as a big as gorilla. Today, the largest lemur weighs 20 lbs. (The smallest, the mouse lemur, weighs 1.1 oz, and has "the smallest known brain of any primate, at just 2 grams," according to Wikipdia.). I'm not sure what kind of lemur this is, but it likes to have people scratch its back. (And this is not a video that should make you feel good, says Barbara J. King, an anthropology professor at the College of William and Mary.) Read the rest

Cat escapes from polygon taped to the floor

Screen Shot 2016-04-27 at 10.15.44 AM

The cat is probably just so interested in the tape that she doesn't want to leave the evil polygon. Which was the polygon's plan all along, of course.

[via] Read the rest

The "rising chimp" problem

chimp

The new book, Einstein's Puzzle Universe, by Tim Dedopulos, is a compendium of good physics and logic problems. Here's one for you to solve:

Imagine that there is an even rope of negligible weight draped over a wheel, which permits it to slide perfectly freely. Equal lengths of the rope descend from either side. On the left side, the rope ends in a 10 kg weight. On the other side, perfectly level with the weight, is a young chimp, also weighing 10 kg.

When you give a signal, the chimp will start climbing the rope. Which of the two, the chimp or the weight, will reach the top first?

Image: Shutterstock Read the rest

Humans, make room for Felines of New York!

tumblr_o3qrsiXhT91t3i99fo1_1280

See sample pages from this book at Wink.

Felines of New York: A Glimpse into the Lives of New York's Feline Inhabitants by Jim Tews Simon and Schuster 2015, 240 pages, 7.4 x 9.1 x 0.7 inches (softcover) $11 Buy a copy on Amazon

A beautiful book with glossy pages, the photographs of the myriad cats in Felines of New York are as diverse as the cats themselves: single portraits that occupy a single page, several that spread across two, working cats, attentive cats, cats ignoring the photographer – all are portrayed. Lolo, a silver tabby in Park Slope, is quoted as saying, “For me, showing love is more about what I won’t do than what I will do. For example, if I love you, I won’t shit outside your bedroom door.” Jeddy, a cat from the Lower East Side, tells us, “My grandparents immigrated here from New Jersey with nothing, and now I have this box. I wish they could see me. They’d be like 'How the f--- did you get that box? We never had a box.' But I don’t know, the box kind of showed up and so I sat in it.”

Author and photographer Jim Tews takes snapshots of the cats he encounters in New York – both feral and community cats, as well as those that live with human owners. From the purebred to those with dubious origins, the photographs are beautiful portraits of cats in their habitats, and short interviews provide insight to their lives. Read the rest

Terrified chimp on the loose in Japan for two hours

Screen Shot 2016-04-15 at 10.23.31 AM

A chimp named Chacha escaped from his enclosure at the Yagiyama Zoological Park in Japan and ran around a neighborhood for two hours. He was shot with dart from a tranquilizer gun and fell from his perch on a telephone poll. It looked like quite a fall, but zoo officials say he is OK.

NY Times:

Television footage showed Chacha perched atop the pole, agitated and screaming at zoo workers below. Even after being shot by a sedative arrow in the back, he desperately tried to escape, dangling from a power line.

He finally fell head down into a blanket held by a dozen workers on the ground.

Read the rest

Serious, pointing people are always better with budgies

056c026d-1c66-4d42-9fae-a8e96df290c5-1020x1042

If you need any proof, look no further than this thread on b3ta's Add an animal challenge. Read the rest

Amazing hi-def video of beetles, larvae, and maggots eating fish

fish

Watch nature's little recyclers completely hollow out two fish in this beautifully-shot timelapse video from BBC.

[via] Read the rest

Sea gull picks a fight with itself

Screen Shot 2016-04-14 at 7.05.24 AM

See video of the bellicose bird bullying itself here. Read the rest

Feathers – A sublime meditation on the brilliance of the bird feather. Released today!

tumblr_o30pqwakMv1t3i99fo1_1280

See sample pages from this book at Wink.

We live in a world of backgrounded miracles, entire worlds of wonder and beauty that we either can’t see or stopped noticing a long time ago. Look closely at the wings of a fly on your window sill, stare into a bisected piece of fruit, or look carefully at a growth of mold on a dish. Millions of such micro worlds surround us, breathtaking examples of design, engineering, and evolutionary artistry. When we bother to look.

Feathers is a photographic examination of one such overlooked natural wonder, the lowly bird feather. A single bird has thousands of feathers, of different types, and there are some ten-thousand species of birds. Feathers takes a broad view of the evolution of the bird and its feathers while focusing its lens on the plumage of 75 or so notable species. Each species gets a few pages, with one or two impressively photographed feather close-ups and a brief explanatory text.

This book reminded me a lot of Rose Lynn Fisher’s BEE (which I loved). Both books are minimal in content and feel, but that only helps to narrow and maintain your focus on the world under examination. The text in Feathers doesn’t try to tell you everything about the species of the bird and feather that you’re looking at, but the bits of fascinating science it does contain are probably far more memorable. Like BEE, I felt like I got to peer into a world I don’t normally see and came away greatly enriched by the experience. Read the rest

Eel and woman become best friends over the years

eel

Valerie Taylor has visited a spotted moray eel for years, and the pair have become "great friends."

[via] Read the rest

Dog alone in car uses horn

dog horn
At a pizza shop in Altoona, Pennsylvania, Melissa Tonkin spotted some dogs left in a car. But they did not need her assistance; one had already figured out what the horn was and was only to happy to alert passers-by. [via] Read the rest

Photo of a man with a peg leg, a monkey, and a parrot

worlds-greatest-photo

When I was in Hawaii I took a photo of a photo of a peg-legged man holding a monkey wearing clothes and keeping a parrot on his shoulder. I had to shoot it through glass so the quality is terrible. Does anyone have a high quality copy? I'd love to get a print and frame it. Read the rest

Dog barks 376,572,715,308 times

Screen Shot 2016-04-06 at 12.59.18 PM

This fellow recorded his dog barking. Then he duplicated the video into a 3x3 grid and played the sound of his dog barking nine times. He repeated the procedure until the dog bark 376,572,715,308 times. (It's OK to skip to the end). Read the rest

It's a monkey in a snowsuit, checking on his pet chickens and goat

fedor

In this heartwarming example of interspecies friendship, a monkey named Fedor makes haste to visit his pet chickens and goat.

[via] Read the rest

Among a Thousand Fireflies: children's book shows the sweet, alien love stories unfolding in our own backyards

056c026d-1c66-4d42-9fae-a8e96df290c5-1020x1023
Rick Lieder -- painter, illustrator, photographer, husband of the brilliant novelist/playwright Kathe Koja -- waits ever-so-patiently in his suburban Detroit back-yard with his camera, capturing candid, lively photos of bees, birds, bugs, and now, in a new book of photos with a beautiful accompanying poem by Helen Frost, fireflies.

Chase freezes man's bank account because his dog's name, 'Dash,' looked like 'Daesh'

Seriously, guys? [Shutterstock.com]

Bruce Francis transferred some money to his dog walker to pay for services to his pit bull, and wrote the dog's name, "Dash," in the notes field.

Read the rest

More posts