Balkan donkey cheese sounds really scrummy


Slobodan Simić is former Serbian parliamentarian who retired to become a conservationist who keeps a herd of Balkan rescue donkeys on the Zasavica Special Nature Reserve near Belgrade, along with wild pigs, cows and beavers, all Balkan species that had dwindled and that he's dedicated to bringing back. Read the rest

Woman taunts snake

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Linda Munoz, of Cuba, Alabama, seemed to think a wild snake wouldn't mind having its tail touched. She was surprised to learn otherwise. Read the rest

Dog dislikes being flipped off


This fellow is going to get his finger excarnated one day if he keeps it up.

[via] Read the rest

Compilation video of annoyed animals giving warning nips to people

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Here are some animals teaching people a lesson. Read the rest

Caterpillar mimics a snake


This Ecuadorian caterpillar not only looks like a scary snake, it will also "strike" at curious creatures. Read the rest

Wild boar goes on rampage in Korean restaurant


How did this boar get in a restaurant?

From YouTube:

A wild boar somehow makes it inside a restaurant in South Korea and proceeds to destroy everything. Terrified customers attempt to flee from the dangerous animal, as others attack him with trolleys and tables. Thankfully no one sustained serious injuries relating to the incident.
Read the rest

Boxiecat is the best cat litter


With three cats, it's important to have good litter. I've tried crystals, clay, scented and unscented. I've settle on Boxiecat ($18 for a 16 lb bag). It's unscented but absorbs odors, clumps well, and there's very little dust. Best of all, the stuff seems to last forever. I just pour in a little from the bag every few days. There's no need to completely clean the litterbox every couple of weeks. Instead, I do a full dump-and-scrub every couple of months.

Two other essential litterbox items: the Clevercat litter box and the heavyweight Durascoop cat litter scoop. Read the rest

Let's check in with Pablo Escobar's herd of feral hippos


In 2003, Colombians began to report encounters with the wild hippos that escaped from Pablo Escobar's private zoo after he was killed by police and his estate was left to rot. Read the rest

Camel bites news reporter's hair

Suddenly camel

After I saw this gif of a camel biting a news reporter's head, I took a look at other camel videos. A lot of videos on YouTube are about biting camels. Example:

Many videos are even worse.

This camel, which is treated with love, has no desire to bite its human friend:

Read the rest

America's Snake: The Rise and Fall of the Timber Rattlesnake


Why would Alcott Smith, at the time nearly seventy, affable and supposedly of sound mind, a blue-eyed veterinarian with a whittled-down woodman’s frame and lupine stamina, abruptly change his plans (and clothes) for a quiet Memorial Day dinner with his companion, Lou-Anne, and drive from his home in New Hampshire to New York State, north along the western rim of a wild lake, to a cabin on a corrugated dirt lane called Porcupine Hollow? Inside the cabin fifteen men quaffed beer, while outside a twenty-five- inch rattlesnake with a mouth full of porcupine quills idled in a homemade rabbit hutch. It was the snake that had interrupted Smith’s holiday dinner. Excerpted from Ted Levin's America's Snake. Available from Amazon.

Because of a cascade of consequences there aren’t many left in the Northeast: timber rattlesnakes are classified as a threatened species in New York and an endangered species everywhere in New England except Maine and Rhode Island where they’re already extinct. They could be gone from New Hampshire before the next presidential primary. Among the cognoscenti it’s speculated whether timber rattlesnakes ever lived in Quebec; they definitely did in Ontario, where rattlesnakes inhabited the sedimentary shelves of the Niagara Gorge but eventually died off like so many failed honeymoons consummated in the vicinity of the falls.

That rattlesnakes still survive in the Northeast may come as a big surprise to you, but that they have such an impassioned advocate might come as an even bigger surprise. Actually, rattlesnakes have more than a few advocates, both the affiliated and the unaffiliated, and as is so often the case, this is a source of emotional and political misunderstandings, turf battles and bruised egos. Read the rest

Ram repeatedly rams a block of insulation foam


This guy says, "I was about to insulate the walls of my house when Rambro broke in and started attacking the bale of glass wool." It looks like they both had a splendid time. Read the rest

Utah police employ "porn-sniffing" dog


A 16-month-old black labrador named URL has been trained to sniff out electronic storage devices for the Weber County Sheriff’s Office in Utah. From Fox 13 Salt Lake:

URL is specifically trained to sniff out electronic storage devices such as thumb drives, cellphones, SIM cards, SD cards, external hard drives, tablets and iPads.

“Whether it’s child porn, or terrorism intelligence, narcotics or financial crimes information, URL has the ability to find evidence hidden on basically any electronic memory device,” the release states.

Authorities say URL will assist investigators on these specific cases and will also be used at the Weber County Jail to locate contraband, such as cellphones.

“URL does not actually search for illegal materials, but rather his highly sensitive nose has been trained to detect the unique chemical compounds found in the certain electronic components,” the release states.

Read the rest

Sharks – Taschen's huge, stunning new book about our ocean's majestic, endangered predators

See sample pages from this book at Wink.

Sharks. Face-to-Face With the Ocean's Endangered Predator by Michael Muller Taschen 2016, 334 pages, 11.5 x 15 x 1.5 inches $45 Buy a copy on Amazon

Sharks. The word alone conjures images of grey and white shadows, dorsal fins slicing through the water, row after row of fierce, terrifying, teeth. And we love them for it. Since Jaws first made us all afraid to go into the water, sharks have become our favorite bad guys. We paint them as the apex predators, devouring everything that dares enter their territory, including we frail, defenseless humans. And then we anthropomorphize them into relentless, driven killers, intent on feasting upon every last one of us. While this characterization makes for great entertainment, it has also lead to the idea that shark attacks are the result of killing machines stalking easy prey instead of the mistaken identity accidents that they are. This, combined with a pronounced market for shark fins, liver, and other body parts has lead to a severe decline in several shark species across the globe.

Sharks are magnificent animals. They are the undisputed kings of the sea, at home and graceful in the ocean, beautiful and awe inspiring to watch. This beautiful animal, while dangerous, is something to be respected rather than feared; they are animals that offer far more in their exotic beauty than ever they could cut up in rare dishes and cuisine. Which is exactly what underwater photographer Michael Muller shows us in Sharks. Read the rest

Why it is a very bad idea to keep a lynx as a pet


Nehala says: This is "what happens when someone mail-orders a lynx, which ends up destructively urinating all over the small apartment, is maladjusted, and is terrified of visitors, or in this case, a housesitter." Read the rest

This dinosaur-like bird enjoys kicking snakes


The secretary bird looks and moves like I'd imagine a dinosaur looked and moved. Here is one giving a rubber snake the business.

From Reuters: "Scientists are studying the snake-hunting ability of the secretary bird from sub-Saharan Africa, which can kick a snake to death with a force five times its own body weight." Read the rest

Enjoy this video of a dog enjoying a video

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Chiko is a shiba inu who seems to enjoy sitting in a chair like a domesticated primate to watch videos. Read the rest

Cabybaras break out of Toronto zoo, on the lam for 3 weeks

Image: Massachusetts Office of Travel and Tourism / Flickr

Capybaras are not only the world's greatest rodents, they are also the world's greatest animals bar none. And now two of them, appropriately named Bonnie and Clyde, are on the lam after busting out of Toronto’s High Park Zoo on May 24. The search for the brobdingnagian guinea pigs has been going on for 3 weeks. From NatGeo:

Canadian city’s residents have taken to the streets (and social media) in an attempt to help officials find the giant rodents and lure them back into captivity.

Easier said than done. It’s been more than three weeks since the pair, now nicknamed Bonnie and Clyde, made a break for it while being transferred to a new enclosure. And so far, attempts to recapture the rodents of interest have come up empty handed.

By the way, capybaras aren't guinea pigs, but they are related. Here's a video of a baby capybara getting to know a guinea pig: Read the rest

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