World's coolest walking cane

snakecane

The Minnesotastan says: "One of my prized possessions is a walking stick that was hand-carved for me by an elderly man in Kentucky when I used to live and work there. The one above was carved by a craftsman in Oregon from a single stick of wood. Here is his video documenting the process."

Mike Stinnet made this copperhead walking cane. He has an Etsy store with other wondrous carvings and paintings. Read the rest

Mischievous baby elephant causes havoc inside home

mZEjLO
Moyo the baby elephant was saved From drowning when he was only four days old. His rescuers delivered him to Roxy, a woman who rehabilitates wild animals. As the baby elephant has grown, he has become something of a nuisance in the house. He grabs things off kitchen counters, knocks over plants, sticks spoons in his mouth, and pees on the floor. Roxy is very patient with Moyo. Read the rest

The Book of Frogs – A meticulous field guide for the serious fan of the frog

tumblr_o2gdwos9bs1t3i99fo1_1280

See sample pages from this book at Wink.

If you are a serious (and I mean serious) fan of the frog, you are in for a real treat. The Book of Frogs is a meticulous field guide to 600 diverse species of frogs, including wonderfully striking, life-size photographs for each and every entry. From poisonous frogs to tiny toenail-sized frogs, whistlers, “explosive breeders,” endangered frogs, and recently discovered frogs, author and one of the world’s leading frog experts Tim Halliday covers an exhaustive gamut of frog species from around the planet. Although a wonderful source for anyone trying to decipher and learn about frogs they find in nature, it’s a hefty, weighty tome of a book and would probably do better on a coffee table than inside a backpack.

The Book of Frogs: A Life-Size Guide to Six Hundred Species from Around the World by Tim Halliday University of Chicago Press 2016, 656 pages, 7.1 x 10.5 x 1.8 inches $37 Buy a copy on Amazon Read the rest

Chimpanzees enjoy magic tricks

pYzBk2

Simon Pierro's iPad Magic delights an mystifies chimpanzees, especially because the magic tricks involve peanuts, which the chimps like to eat. Read the rest

Chumbuddies: giant marine animals you sleep inside of

71IwpJthlsL._SL1500_

Patchtogether's Chumbuddies are a full range of plush marine animal sleeping bags that you crawl inside of before bed. Read the rest

Sparrow joins Japanese family

A sparrow followed an elderly Japanese woman home from her job as a crossing guard in November, and now lives with her and her husband. "He's like a family member - he's very comforting. It's fun, coming home to a sparrow," Yoshiko Fujino told Reuters. Read the rest

Birds are jerks compilation

birds

Clip'wreck says: "Birds can be jerks, and the internet is full of proof. Be they duck, ostrich, swan, goose, crow, parrot, penguin, chicken or seagull, none can be trusted. Enjoy this compilation video of birds being rude, destructive, crazy, selfish, and mean."

[via] Read the rest

Handmade Japanese leather goldfish bags

tumblr_nq4pzvDMou1snlnsio1_1280

Atelier Iwakiri handmakes its nubuck goldfish purses to order, with a two-week to three-month lead time between orders and delivery. Read the rest

Watch single cell organism attack its prey

cell

It's a ciliate eat ciliate world. Filmed by Wim van Egmond of the Micropolitan Museum in the Netherlands. [via] Read the rest

Lady and deer stamp their feet at each other

wprAow

Some people think the deer is copying the lady, but I think it's the other way around.

[via] Read the rest

I Will Always Remember You

Top Elephant Image

The power of simple animation can be overwhelming. This film, I Will Always Remember You by Hugo Guinness, done for The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust, is shattering.

The technique used by artist Hugo Guinness appears to be a tribute to Windsor McKay’s Gertie the Dinosaur, the first animated character (in 1914) generally credited as having a personality. It is used here not for whimsy, but artfully to devastating effect. So many emotions conveyed by so few lines.

Sometimes the simplest things are the most effective.

For a mere $50, you can foster a young elephant.

From The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust:

Every orphan of poaching once had a family. As Hugo Guinness’ moving animation shows, at our Nursery, we offer hope, a future and a second chance at life to victims of the ivory trade. This is their story.

‪#‎RememberMe‬ - Please share this film far and wide! Survivors, like the orphan elephant in the film, have the opportunity to not only live, but to go on and start their own families back in the wild.

Want to be a part of their future? Foster an orphaned baby elephant in our care.

Our biggest thanks to acclaimed artist Hugo Guinness, Allegra Pilkington and Luisa Crosbie for creating such a powerful animation, with original music by Joe Trapanese and support from J. Crew.

Read the rest

Kitten pops a water balloon in slow motion

kitten

See the extended director's cut gif here. Read the rest

How to make your own cat scratching posts

img_0533

Mr. Homegrown shows how to make a cat scratching post from some rope and lumber. He writes, 'I’m so satisfied with the results that I’m thinking about creating a integrated cat scratcher/USB charging station/cat perch using a twisty tree branch. I know, that sounds like a bad idea, but as Marshall McLuhan once said, “If you don’t like that idea I’ve got others.'" Read the rest

Monkeys make surprisingly terrible random-number generators

056c026d-1c66-4d42-9fae-a8e96df290c5-1020x926

Back in 2002, artists at England's Plymouth University teamed up with Paignton Zoo to see if monkeys could write Shakespeare. Read the rest

Kitten fails to impress tortoise

kitten

[via] Read the rest

Tender arthropod: mama centipede cradles her young

1n26zXw (1)

Ivealreadyreddit, who's working in Thailand, posted this picture of a tropical centipede cradling her newly hatched babies. Dawwww. Read the rest

That time the DoD paid Duke U $335K to investigate ESP in dogs. Yes, dogs.

Grant

Michael from Muckrock writes, "Government research often pushes the boundaries between science and science fiction. Today, the proud bearer of that mantle is often DARPA, experimenting with robots, cybernetics, and more. But in the sixties, during the height of the Cold War, this research often went into more fantastical realms, even exploring whether ExtraSensory Perception (ESP) was possible. Thanks to FOIA, MuckRock looks back on the paranormal history of American surveillance." Read the rest

More posts