What "the worst ride in Disney World" teaches us about media strategy


Foxxfurr's latest article on Disney theme park history is yet another amazing and insightful read that uses the tenth anniversary of Stitch's Great Escape ("the worst ride in Disney World") as a jumping-off point to show how the history of theme-parks, animation, the elusive 5-12 year old boy market, and the entertainment business all influenced one another.

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Incredibly-designed record players of yore

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Above, Hartmut Esslinger's incredible Wega Stereo Concept 51 (1978), from the Museum of Modern Art's exhibition "Making Music Modern: Design for Ear and Eye" opening this weekend.

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Gallery of poor design choices

Sauces that look like car polish. Windshield cleaner that looks like blue soda. Atrocious architecture. Unintentionally sexual signage. Confusing instructions. Enjoy this gallery of lousy design.

Color palette generator for designers in a hurry

coolors

Coolors is "the super fast color scheme generator for cool designers." Just hit the space bar to see a new palette, and get inspired.

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Furniture from old Apple G5 towers

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Klaus Geiger's concept design for minimalist furniture fashioned from the chassis of old Apple PowerMac G5 tower computers

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Semi-rigid, cubical rubber bands


From designer Nendo, "the geometrical shapes make the bands easy to find in a drawer and easy to pick up." Eye-watering pricetag, though: about $10 for three from Mark's.

cubic rubber-band (via Colossal)

(Image: Akihiro Yoshida)

Comic sans typewriter

Artist Jesse England modified a typewriter to use a Comic Sans typeface. "If I'd made it in Helvetica people would've just observed it as a little design experiment," he says of his device, called the Sincerity Machine.

Google releases set of beautiful, freely usable icons


They're licensed CC-BY-SA and designed for use in mobile apps and other interactive stuff -- there's 750 in all! It's part of Google's Material Design project.

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Scarfolk: creepy blog is now an amazing book

Back in August, I blogged the announcement of the forthcoming Discovering Scarfolk, a book-length adaptation of the brilliantly creepy Scarfolk Council blog, which chronicles the government publications of a English town that is forever trapped in a loop from 1969-1979, a town that's like Nightvale crossed with Liartown USA, written by John Wyndham. Today, it's out!

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Streetwear for superheroes


I found Volante Designs at New York Comic-Con today and was instantly taken with their dramatic coats and hoodies, styled to look like something a superhero would wear, all made in the USA.

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The In Vitro Meat Cookbook

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Unreal lab-grown oysters from "The In Vitro Meat Cookbook," a glorious exercise in recipes as design fiction from Next Nature. More over at re:form.

Second skin spacesuit

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MIT researchers are developing a "second skin" space suit lined with tiny coils that contract when switched on, tightening the garment around the body.

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Chair that casts a monstrous shadow


At first glance, Yaara Derkel's 'Coppelius' chair appears to be a friendly "thonet" style wooden chair.

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Scott Albrecht: new show of hand-drawn typographical art and woodworks

Situations_Wood_CULMINATION

My hypertalented pal Scott Albrecht, a Brooklyn-based artist and designer, has a solo show of his hand-drawn typographical illustrations and wood sculptures opening tomorrow at Philadelphia's Art In The Age boutique and gallery.

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Visual Explanations - Tufte's best book

Edward Tufte has made his career teaching us how to create compelling factual illustrations. He follows his own advice in his four exquisitely designed books which he has self-published over the past decade. Each book develops his ideas of minimal decoration and maximum understanding for charts and diagrams. All his books are good, but I think his second, Visual Explanations, is his best. It is a short course in conveying critical information in a visual form. Whether you start with text, data, or ideas, he lays out some sound principles in how to convey these facts in pictures. His own pages are great examples of how readers benefit by these principles. Printed with love, including pages with pasted in cutouts, this timeless book will never go out of date, and is likely to be passed on to future generations.

Visual Explanations: Images and Quantities, Evidence and Narrative, by Edward R. Tufte

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