Boing Boing 

Nerdy status-badges for kids


Isiah Saxon made a set of amazing badges for DIY, a program to teach kids skills.

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Beautiful imaginary Hungarian money


Barbara Bernát designed a series of fanciful Hungarian euro notes for her MA project at the University of West Hungary.

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A book of smart ideas about design

I found 101 Things I Learned in Architecture School (part of the popular series) in an airport bookshop. Thumbing through it, I learned three or four new things about design, presenting design, and how to think about design. That was enough for me. I nabbed a copy.



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Pizza condoms


Marina Malygina's mock-ups for a pizza-themed condom in its own little pizza box is intended to help resolve the American love of both food and sex.

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Beautiful short documentary on the art of letterpress

The Folio Society interviewed master printer Stan Lane about the classic craft of letterpress printing. "Feeling print in paper... you know someone's actually been there."

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Watch this Trioh demo: stylish rechargeable accent or emergency light

One of my favorite crowdfunded projects is the beautiful Trioh rechargeable 3-in-1 light, which the makers claim is the "world's most beautiful flashlight."

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Fun videos teach design concepts to kids

From the excellent website, The Kid Should See This.

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Watch how this house's rotating rooms go indoor to outdoor

Architect Alireza Taghaboni designed Shafri-Ha House with three rotating rooms, to take advantage of nice weather and close off the rooms on wintry days.

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Handy guide to image file types and when to use each

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Arunshory M posted a handy chart from Who is Hosting This describing image file types and the best ways to use each one.

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3D printed prosthetic leg


William Root's "Exo-Prosthetic" is a 3D printed artificial leg made from laser-sintered titanium, which uses a 3D scan of the wearer's truncated limb for fit, and a 3D scan of the intact limb for form.

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Popular Skullture - the skull motif in pulps, paperbacks, and comics

Monte Beauchamp’s book, Popular Skullture is a refreshing look back at the early days of mass culture print publishing, when skulls still evoked a sense of the macabre. Skulls are no longer scary symbols of death, poison, or motorcycle outlaws. As design elements they are so popular now that they appear on baby clothing. They’ve become kind of boring, because they’ve lost their punch.

Apart from a couple of short introductory pieces at the beginning, the book consists entirely of skull-themed cover art from pulp magazines, comic books, and paperback novels. With an eye for the imaginative, Beauchamp has selected covers that make clever, odd, and funny use of skulls.

See sample pages of Popular Skullture at Wink. Sign up for our weekly newsletter of cool book recommendations.

Beautiful Japanese Firefox OS phone in a transparent case

Al sends us the Fx0, a "beautiful mid-range phone running Firefox OS announced in Japan today by KDDI, one of Japan's largest mobile phone companies."

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Otis and Dorothy Shepard: exemplars of mid-20th century design

Anyone with even a passing interest in mid-20th century design has heard of Charles and Ray Eames, but Otis and Dorothy Shepard were arguably the more influential designing couple. Until recently, little was known about the pair, each of whom was an accomplished artist in their own right, efficient with line, unerring with color. A gorgeous new book by Norman Hathaway and Dan Nadal titled Dorothy and Otis: Designing the American Dream corrects this gap in the design literature. Filled with never-before-published materials from the Shepard family’s archives, the book is packed with both personal photos and key examples of their work from the 1930s to 1960s.

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Play thousands of 48-hour game jam entries

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The Ludum Dare international game jam is probably the largest event of its kind -- and the longest running, at over 12 years. Three times a year, game developers are challenged to build and share a new game within 48 hours, often documenting their process and making source code available. Each time, the community votes to agree on a theme.

This year's is 'Entire Game On One Screen.' Which sounds simple, like, 'okay, no iPad companion app,' but it's actually a real design challenge -- just think about how many games have menu screens, inventory screens, y'know, different levels, little things like that.

The submission phase is over, and anyone who wants to dive in can play and rate the 2,637 games, with 1,365 in actual competition (here's a cool entry browser if the website itself is overwhelming). It's fun to get involved, not only to learn more about the rapid prototyping process, but to see the seeds of game design's next wave of inspiration. The winner of the competition is always a creator to watch.

There's often a lot of brilliant weirdness -- like this 'hot n cold' maze game led by staring animals. Or this -- what is this? And there's something about this simple but beautifully-drawn dragon game that takes me back to the interactive net art domains I used to visit in the 90s.

Spacetime curvature placemats


AP Works's Trick Mat is a placemat that mimics spacetime curvature; no word on whether or how it can be purchased, alas (though you could probably make a pretty good disposable facsimile with an inkjet printer and some vector-art software). (via Super Punch)

Snap-together Strandbeest kit

Theo Jansen's amazing, wind-walking Strandbeest (featured in my story the Man Who Sold the Moon) can be had as a 6-inch-cubed snap-together, 80-piece, chunky "rhino" kit: assemble and blow on it and it will walk across your desk with the odd majesty of the Strandbeest.

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