Vintage Air India route map on a souvenir hand fan

Everything about this 1960s combination map and fan is fantastic: the Asia-centric map, the gold foil edges, the delicate wooden handle, and the beautiful illustrations. Lovely and doubly practical! Read the rest

Check out Frederik Vanhoutte's experiments in generative graphics

Frederik Vanhoutte describes himself as a creative coder who works in the field of generative art. His site W:BLUT has lots of cool little experiments. Above, Big Red I, a longer fractal experiment that evokes FRank Lloyd Wright. Read the rest

Designer Marc Newson makes a $12,000 hourglass

I love hearing Marc Newson talk about why his hourglass is worth $12,000. Hurry, it's limited to 100 units!

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Vintage isochrone maps show 19th-century travel times

In the late 19th century, travel times became a thing of fascination as modes of transportation improved by leaps and bounds (e.g., Around the World in 80 Days, published in 1873). Great thinkers of the day like Francis Galton even devised isochrone maps, which showed how long it would take to get from a central point to other points of interest. Read the rest

Here are the favorite book designs of master book designers

I've bought an awful lot of books just because I liked the cover. I don't regret it. It's like buying an art print that you can pull from your shelf an admire at any time. In this Magenta article, Belinda Lanks asks noted designers about their favorite book covers.

If you ask me who my favorite book jacket designer of all time is, it’s Alvin Lustig. If you ask me which of his jacket designs is my favorite, it’s impossible. It’s most certainly one of the jackets he designed for New Directions’ New Classics. Lustig essentially branded the New Direction series with a modern look that was reminiscent of what was going on in the fine art world. It’s as if he translated a Calder sculpture or a Joan Miro painting into a book cover. Each book is reduced to color, line, shape, and type to reflect the feel of the book rather than the literal content. The geometric shapes, the bold color palettes, the freeform lines still feel modern today. -- Rex Bonomelli

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Watch how this app uses AI to colorize vintage photos

This fancy interactive deep colorization software harnesses AI to fill in colors on a black and white photo with just a few inputs. Watch this cool demo. Read the rest

Inexpensive keyboard has two settings: “OFF” and “NO”

The mechanical Royal Kludge keyboard (Update: in stock here) seems to do well with Amazon reviewers, but there are no guarantees you'll receive one with the coveted OFF/NO switch. Read the rest

Minimalist tattoos drawn with one continuous line

Berlin-based artist Mo Ganji creates deceptively simple tattoos using a continuous line. Read the rest

Media logos were originally physical sculptures

This behind-the-scenes look at the giant practical set built for HBO's 1983 station identification sequence is impressive. It inspired Christopher Johnson at Colossal to dig into the archives for more great examples, including a vintage logo created 63 years ago for Eurovision: Read the rest

Chanel now sells a very expensive boomerang

Iconic high fashion house Chanel is now selling a branded boomerang. It's part of a line of lifestyle sport items including a beach racket, tennis racket and balls, and a paddle board. The boomerang is wood and resin and, of course, emblazoned with the Chanel logo. It is $1,325. Chanel Boomerang (via Uncrate) Read the rest

Mind-bending infinite gif loop for psychedelia festival

O.Z.O.R.A. Festival is billed as a psychedelic tribal gathering in Dádpuszta, Hungary. Their website splash page is a gorgeous infinite gif that you can set to trance or chill music. Read the rest

Book chronicles artists' calling cards over the centuries

Oracles is a new book that presents 123 notable calling cards in an interesting way: as facsimiles of the originals, inserted into a two-page spread giving context. Read the rest

Gallery of computer interfaces from science fiction movies

sciencefictioninterfaces.tumblr.com is exactly what its name suggests. I am envious of the people who make computer interfaces for movies. Their designs just have to look pretty.

If you like this kind of stuff, I recommend the book, Make It So: Interaction Design Lessons from Science Fiction, by Nathan Shedroff and Christopher Noessel.

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Gorgeous aviary of hundreds of papercraft birds

The Paper Aviary just completed a successful free exhibition of beautifully-crafted paper birds. Let's hope it travels following its inaugural success! Read the rest

"Hole Roll": blackout curtains with trompe l'oeil cityscapes cut into them

Hole Roll is (was? the post dates from 2014 and their website is down) a Ukrainian blind company that published some early designs for blackout curtains cut into intricate nighttime cityscapes that let you create the illusion of being in a skyscraper penthouse after dark in the middle of the day in a suburban tract home. (via Colossal) Read the rest

Gallery of science fiction interfaces

Science Fiction Interfaces, gathered by nnkd, represent the myriad yet curiously familiar systems of control found in other worlds and times.

Previously: Chris Noessel: lessons of science fiction computer interfaces User interfaces in sf movies and tv Read the rest

Collapsible wooden seat parametrically designed via implicit programming

SWISH is a lovely portable stool created by feeding inputs into design software and seeing what the software generated. Carlo Ratti Associati debuted this prototype at Milan Design Week 2017. Read the rest

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