A house for tomorrow in Los Angeles

This week on HOME: Stories From L.A., a member of the Boing Boing Podcast Network:

How will we live in 20 years? Or 50? Or 100? A one-of-a-kind, only-in-LA plot at the very end of Mulholland Highway inspired some of the world's best designers to think hard about the home of the future, in Los Angeles and beyond.

This is the first episode of Season 5. You can catch up on the whole series at the iTunes Store... and while you're there, if you get a minute to leave the show a rating and review that'd be much appreciated. It's a small thing that makes a big difference in spreading the word. 

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iTunes | Android | Email | Google Play | Stitcher | TuneIn | RSS Read the rest

NIGHTGARDENERS: eerie familiarity, illustrated

Belgian artist Jan Pypers created NIGHTGARDENERS, a series of evocative photorealistic illustrations depicting nighttime scenes that are both recognizable and foreign. Each invites the viewer to make up a story. Read the rest

Striking ombré glass chair

Dutch artist Germans Ermič crafted this lovely ombré glass chair, an update of the classic laminated glass chair created by Shiro Kuramata in 1976. Read the rest

Mesmerizing sculpture emits smoke-filled bubbles

Smoke-filled bubbles fall like fruits from an otherworldly tree in this beautiful installation titled New Spring. Read the rest

The Roman Empire as a modern subway transit map

Sasha Trubetskoy always makes great maps, like this cool imagining of the Roman Empire road system in the style of a public transit system. Read the rest

Here’s how the 1980s got its colorful look

It turns out a lot of the aesthetics of the 1980s can be traced back to an Italian design collective. As Vox explains in this new video created by Dion Lee:

[The] Memphis Design movement dominated the '80s with their crazy patterns and vibrant colors. Many designers and architects from all around the world contributed to the movement in order to escape from the strict rules of modernism. Although their designs didn't end up in people's homes, they inspired many designers working in different mediums. After their first show in Milan in 1981, everything from fashion to music videos became influenced by their visual vocabulary.

[via The A.V. Club] Read the rest

Origami lounge-chairs that flat-pack to the size of a briefcase

The Flux chair is a $130, 12lb "origami-style" polypropylene lounge chair designed by Douwe Jacobs; it sets up in minutes and is stable and lovely (there's also a $65 kids' version and a whole range of furnishings including a bar, coffee table, countertop, end-table, etc). (via Yanko Design) Read the rest

Find out what makes things cool

Think you know how to make something cool? Mid-century industrial designer Raymond Leowry sure did. He's behind some of the most iconic pieces of American culture, including the Coke bottle and the Shell logo.

In this video, Derek Thompson of The Atlantic shares Leowry's effective MAYA (Most Advanced. Yet Acceptable) principle. The trick is this, Thompson says:

To sell something surprising, make it familiar. To sell something familiar, make it surprising.

Science even backs him up. Read the rest

3D-printed garment with motion-detecting LED lighting

Benhaz Farahi continues to experient at the intersection of technology and fashion, this time with Bodyscape, a sculpted form that's underlit with LEDs. As the wearer moves, the lights shift around the garment. Read the rest

José Bernabé's organic geometry

Graphic designer José Bernabé explores a lot of wonderful concepts as part of his work, including this standalone project titled Organic Geometry. Note: if you click this link to see more, there's a supremely annoying autoplaying song embedded. Read the rest

Fascinating look at high-tech fashion design

This short documentary on the creative process behind Iris van Herpen's Spring/Summer 2017 line is really cool. So many possibilities! Read the rest

Monument Valley 2 has finally arrived

Monument Valley is one of the most beautiful and soothing mobile games I have ever played. At long last, the sequel is here! Read the rest

These three very different structural elements were designed to carry the same load

Dinotopia artist Jim Gurney says: "Computer modeling tools such as ZBrush and Maya have made it easier to visualize whatever form that a human designer imagines.|And 3D printing has made it possible to translate that design into physical form."

The generative process yields dozens or even hundreds of options, and the human can select which one to produce.

This new enterprise is variously called "deep-learning generative design," "intuitive AI design," and "algorithmic design." New plugins for Maya have already made such technology available.

The designs generated by this process look like something out of Art Nouveau.

They look biological, resembling skeletal architecture, with curving shapes. As with biological forms there are no straight lines and no right angles. There's no consideration of style. They're not made to look beautiful but rather to be efficient. Generative designs are vastly lighter and stronger than human designs.

The forms are often surprisingly complex, apparently more intricate than they need to be. They're not necessarily easy to produce without a 3D printer.

Read the rest

Vintage Air India route map on a souvenir hand fan

Everything about this 1960s combination map and fan is fantastic: the Asia-centric map, the gold foil edges, the delicate wooden handle, and the beautiful illustrations. Lovely and doubly practical! Read the rest

Check out Frederik Vanhoutte's experiments in generative graphics

Frederik Vanhoutte describes himself as a creative coder who works in the field of generative art. His site W:BLUT has lots of cool little experiments. Above, Big Red I, a longer fractal experiment that evokes FRank Lloyd Wright. Read the rest

Designer Marc Newson makes a $12,000 hourglass

I love hearing Marc Newson talk about why his hourglass is worth $12,000. Hurry, it's limited to 100 units!

[via] Read the rest

Vintage isochrone maps show 19th-century travel times

In the late 19th century, travel times became a thing of fascination as modes of transportation improved by leaps and bounds (e.g., Around the World in 80 Days, published in 1873). Great thinkers of the day like Francis Galton even devised isochrone maps, which showed how long it would take to get from a central point to other points of interest. Read the rest

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