You can live in a giant cowboy boot for $40 a day

If Huntsville, Texas sounds like the kind of place you'd like to kick your boots off and sit a spell, you might rent this beaut of a boot, featuring two bedrooms, a bath, and an open-air deck on the top.

Read the rest

This sky pool lets you walk on air (in water)

At a Houston apartment complex called Market Square Tower, residents can walk on air (in water) via a glass-bottomed pool suspended 500 feet in the air.

Read the rest

New cars that look like old classics

I like modern Mini Coopers, but whenever I see a one of the originals (like the one I saw in Japan a few weeks ago, below) I wish they would have made the new ones look exactly like the old ones.

I suppose there's a bunch of safety regulations that make it difficult to build exact reproductions of old cars (I wouldn't want my kids driving the no-front-end 1971 VW camper van I drove in high school). But I should have known that there are companies making near-faithful replicas of classic cars. They cost a fortune, but they look great. Core77 has an article about this trend, titled, "Beyond Retro Design: People Want New Things That are Old, or Old Things That are New."

Core77 wishes that this trend could take off in the consumer products space, too.

Snip:

While these cars are obviously out-of-reach by folks of average income, I wouldn't mind seeing this new-old or old-new trend applied to other original designs in the consumer products space. For example, after writing the History of Braun Design series some years ago, I became so smitten with their 1962 Sixtant SM 31 electric razor that I had to have one.

I tracked down and found one on the secondhand market that had been shipped from Italy. It's heavy and substantial, has an internal voltage converter so works on 110V and despite being over 50 years old it still works like it's brand-new. It's one of my favorite possessions. I paid $23 for it and I will keep it forever.

Read the rest

A beautifully illustrated edition of Hans Christian Andersen's The Snow Queen

The Hans Christian Andersen classic, The Snow Queen, is a quick and enjoyable read, made all the more so with printmaker Sanna Annukka’s gorgeous illustrations. You’ll likely recognize the textile designer’s aesthetic from Marimekko and, not surprisingly, many of her illustrations make full use of her bold, geometric patterns through the characters’ dress. Her landscapes look like fabrics, too. A panel that shows a wintry countryside looks like it could be a weaving and I wish I could buy another, a garden in full bloom, by the bolt.

The story itself is not what I had expected. In many ways, the titular character is a minor player. The heroine is a young girl, Gerda, who journeys bravely and earnestly, escaping numerous villains by virtue of her devotion to her young friend and playmate, Kay, who has been lured away by the Snow Queen. Kay first fell victim to the heart-numbing trickery of the devil himself, who had accidentally broken an evil mirror crafted to reflect and amplify only the most wicked and ugly things in the world. When the mirror breaks, pieces “smaller than a grain of sand” are sent flying around the word, one of which sticks in Kay’s eye, and another which pierces and chills his heart. As the Snow Queen further freezes Kay’s heart with a kiss, Gerda braves witches, haunts, thieves, and icy winds to save her friend.

Maybe it’s because I’m a mom who is worn out on Frozen, the Disney smash hit (which refuses to die, despite every parent’s best efforts) that was loosely based on the fairy tale, but I wish that the movie more closely echoed the actual story. Read the rest

Check out this new Mario-themed pop-up bar in DC

To celebrate Cherry Blossom season in Washington DC, Southern Efficiency created a Japanese-themed pop-up bar. Cute video is starting to emerge of people who braved the long lines. Read the rest

Twitter replaces egg with genderless head and shoulders icon

The thinking behind Twitter's replacement for the troll-favorite egg profile photo is a vaguely human placeholder that is unpleasant enough to encourage people to replace it with a custom icon.

We noticed that some people kept the egg default profile photo because they thought it was fun and cute, but we want people to use this space to show us who they are! The new default image feels more like an empty state or placeholder, and we hope it encourages people to upload images that express themselves.

We’ve noticed patterns of behavior with accounts that are created only to harass others – often they don’t take the time to personalize their accounts. This has created an association between the default egg profile photo and negative behavior, which isn’t fair to people who are still new to Twitter and haven’t yet personalized their profile photo.

Will it work? Read the rest

Astonishing book tunnel entrance to bookstore

Chinese bookstore Yangzhou Zhongshuge has arguably the most breathtaking bookstore entrance in the world. Read the rest

When should web designers use modal overlays?

"This web page needs to be interrupted by a lightbox effect and a modal dialog asking me to sign up for a mailing list," said no one ever. Read the rest

A climbable personal library in an old elevator shaft

Studio North was commissioned to refit an old elevator shaft in a converted warehouse loft in Calgary; they built a tall, narrow library with climbable shelves whose hand- and foot-holds retract into the shelving. Read the rest

The Falsum: a free, open brand for the anti-⊥rump Resistance

Aaron created the Falsum, a fully worked branding guideline with templates and a style guide for a wordmark and logo for resisting Trumpism. Read the rest

Fantastic avant-garde and counterculture posters for sale

The intrepid counterculture archivists/publishers of Boo-Hooray have posted their "Top 100 Posters" for sale. What a stunning collection of avant-garde art and design. It makes me yearn for the downtown scenes of the prior century.

Read the rest

Experiments with thermochromic hair dye

Lauren Bowker's UK-based firm The Unseen is currently working on a bunch of cool thermochromic textile and dye applications, like this hair color that responds to heat. Read the rest

Cover reveal for My Best Friend's Exorcism - looks like 1980s VHS rental

Back in September 2014, I wrote about the design package for Grady Hendrix's horror novel Horrorstor - a classic haunted house story set at an IKEA and designed like an IKEA catalog. The paperback cover for Hendrix's next book, My Best Friend's Exorcism, was designed by Doogie Horner. I love it!

Via Quirk Books: In 2016, Quirk released Hendrix's second horror novel, titled My Best Friend's Exorcism - a horror novel set in the 80's, that's best described as, Beaches meets The Exorcist. The book received fantastic reviews. In anticipation of the July 2016 paperback release, Quirk has worked with Australian artist Hugh Fleming to create a VHS-style cover. Fleming is best-known for his cinematic and photo-realistic style and his art turns Hendrix's excellent book into a fun object. Read the rest

Futuracha Pro, a font that "evolves" as you type

Futuracha Pro is a typeface designed to take excessive advantage of alternatives, ligatures and other features of modern fonts, so much so that as you type, the words evolve into striking, but consistent new forms.[via Bored Panda]

Futuracha Pro is an Open Type Font, which magically adjusts and readjusts as you write. Its quirkiness and eccentricity are the two main features that made it one of the most beloved fonts in the whole world. Until today, nobody was able to just sit down and type with it. Featuring various combinations of letters and plenty of playful ligatures, Futuracha Pro gives creative people the opportunity to actually type and create, making their ideas extraordinary and unique!

Currently available as an elaborate nest of EPS files, a proper font's been in the works for years. You can preorder it for $50, but it's still cooking and will not be available until May.

Read the rest

Beautiful collages depict untranslatable words

Lithuanian artist Jolita Vaitkutė created this charming series of images depicting untranslatable words, based on the word's meaning. Read the rest

Fiverr's new recruiting ad promises to literally work you to death

It's not a parody, apparently: "You eat a coffee for lunch. You follow through on your follow through. Sleep deprivation is your drug of choice. You might be a doer. In doers we trust." As Nick Mamatas says, "Back in the 1990s, this ad would be the result of billboard liberation." Read the rest

Futuracha, a beautiful, ornamental typeface that magically adjusts as you type

Futuracha is a successfully crowdfunded typeface that makes use of Open Type's wizardry to switch its ligatures as you type, producing beautiful effects -- before the crowdfunding campaign, Futuracha users had to hand-set those ligatures, but now it's just type and go. $50 for a commercial license, $15 for a personal license. Ships in May. (via Red Ferret) Read the rest

More posts