How LSD became a brain hemorrhage patient's lifesaver

In GQ, Eric Perry writes about how a brain hemorrhage left him "depressed, stuck in a rut, and strangely fearful of death." Then he learned of new medical research on the benefits of psychedelic therapy to treat anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder. So Perry signed up for his own acid test with others who were seeking solace via psychedelic experiences. From GQ:

My guide for the evening had accepted my 400 dollars, the price for my journey, in tie-dyed pants. It was my own fault I wasn’t tripping very hard—I’d told her, out of nervousness, I didn’t want to travel to other planets—though I suspected she knew less about the “sacraments” she was prescribing to us than she purported to. (“Do you know that Peruvians drip ayahuasca into the eyes of their newborns?” she’d told me earlier. “All Peruvians?” I’d asked, and she’d blushed.) Still, I liked her, partly because there was something in her eyes that made me think of the Wordsworth line from “Elegiac Stanzas”: “A deep distress hath humanized my soul.” I sensed there’d been some suffering in her past. Many of the participants, I noticed, had the same benignly haunted look. An ex-physician told us that ten years ago she’d been diagnosed with advanced-stage cancer; she’d recovered, but couldn’t shake the feeling that it would return any second to finish her off. To allay her lingering fear of death, she’d enrolled in a psilocybin trial, and her “whole reality changed.” She divorced her husband and began to juggle motherhood and what full-time psychonauts call “The Work,” traveling the world to partake in aya ceremonies.

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As Walter White was to meth, so is the “Drug Wizard of Wichita” to Fentanyl

Photo: Fusion

The potent drug Fentanyl is widely used in medicine as a painkiller, and in anesthesia for major surgery. The intensely concentrated opiate is also a recreational street drug, with a growing number of addicted users--some of whom consume it together with chemically related opiates such as heroin.

Fusion profiles George Marquardt, an eccentric gadgeteer in Wichita, KS who became a career clandestine chemist. How important was he? When the feds finally nabbed Marquardt, the country's first “Fentanyl epidemic” dried right up.

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Sarah Palin on drugs

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Erowid Sarah Palin is a Twitter bot that melds Sarah Palin speeches with psychedelic trip reports posted to the excellent Erowid drug information clearinghouse.

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Gay Tory MP outs himself as a "poppers" user, slams proposed ban

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UK Conservative MP Crispin Blunt, former Minister for Justice, has "outed" himself as a user of poppers -- alkyl nitrites, a psychoactive inhalant often taken before sex -- and decried his party's plan to class poppers as an illegal drug. Read the rest

5 books that bust the myths of drug writing

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In November of 2014, my crime thriller Cracked was published by Titan Books. Its protagonist is a crack-addicted former fighter and personal trainer, Danielle “Danny” Cleary.

Soon after I signed the publishing contract for this series – it will be a trilogy – I realized with a kind of sinking, sickening clarity, that I might be asked about the drug use in the book. While Cracked isn’t about, uh, crack per se, I knew that having an addict for a heroine was going to raise some eyebrows. The drug use, like some of the violence in the book, is precise and detailed. Barbra Leslie's Cracked is available from Amazon.

Now, I’ve never been a fighter (although I do like to punch things). But the drug use? Yeah, I didn’t have to make that part up. Ten years ago, after a painful split from my then-husband, I tossed my middle-class, respectable life out the window and dove head-first into a world of dive bars, cocaine and finally, after falling for a guy whose addiction beat mine by many years and orders of magnitude, crack. (This was very out of character for me: I’m one of those people who can’t smoke weed without feeling nauseous, and never had a second’s interest in any hallucinogen or opiate, though à chacun son goût, and all that.) I was able to stop. I’ve been drug-free for about seven years now.

Despite all this – and my bookworm English degree, and a life filled with reading nearly everything I could get my hands on – I was never attracted to books about drugs, or written by addicts. Read the rest

Esoteric Australian political humour: Stoner Sloth vs Tony Abbot

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Here's the joke: Stoner Sloth is a disastrous, tin-eared anti-marijuana ad campaign from the New South Wales Department of Premier and Cabinet. Read the rest

Experts baffled to learn that 2 years olds are being prescribed psychiatric drugs

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In 2014, US doctors wrote ~20,000 prescriptions for risperidone, quetiapine and other antipsychotics for children under the age of two; a cohort on whom these drugs have never been tested and for whom there is no on-label usage. Read the rest

Robert Silverberg's government-funded guide to the psychoactive drugs of sf

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In 1974, the US National Institute on Drug Abuse commissioned sf giant Robert Silverberg to research and write Drug Themes in Science Fiction," a survey of 75 sf stories and novels that included fictional psychoactive drugs. Read the rest

When the INS tried to deport John Lennon, the FBI pitched in to help

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Michael from Muckrock writes, "While patiently noting that their anonymous tipsters thought Lennon was not a 'true revolutionist' because he used drugs, the FBI worked with INS over several years to bolster a case to deport the Beatles' musical genius." Read the rest

Man finds 3 ounces of weed hidden inside drink can purchased at Walmart

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Keanu Netzler of Salt Lake City, Utah said his girlfriend bought him a can of Arizona Iced Tea from the local Wal-Mart. At home, he tried to open the can, but had difficulty. He cut the can open and found a cement sleeve inside stuffed with three ounces of weed.

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Wikipedia Russia suspends editor who tried to cut deal with Russian authorities

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A Wikipedia editors has been suspended after he organized a meeting with the Russian Federal Drug Control Service (as well as Rospotrebnadzor, a consumer rights watchdog, and Roskomnadzor, a media watchdog) to set terms under which "the expert opinion of authorized government bodies" would be inserted into Wikipedia entires on “socially sensitive” topics. Read the rest

Never before published photos from Psychedelic Conference II in Santa Barbara, 1983

Albert Hofmann in the Cafe.

Photos by Cynthia Palmer. Read the rest

13 hospitalized in San Diego after overdose of synthetic drug Spice

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Thirteen people were hospitalized on Sunday after they were found vomiting, convulsing, and behaving oddly in downtown San Diego, California. According to the San Diego Fire-Rescue Department, they had all overdosed on Spice, a dried plant mixture laced with synthetic cannabinoids that are structurally similar to the THC, the natural cannabinoid in marijuana.

Unlike THC, which is has very low toxicity, synthetic cannabinoids can affect different brain receptors and can cause blood pressure spikes, vomiting, seizures, and other serious conditions.

Synthetic cannabinoids have been illegal since 2013, but some people favor them over weed because they can use them and pass a urine test and keep their job or not violate probation. [via] Read the rest

Microdoses of LSD and mushrooms as an alternative to Adderall (or coffee!)

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Self-experimenters, inspired by a 2011 presentation by The Psychedelic Explorer's Guide author James Fadiman, are taking tiny "sub-perceptual" doses of LSD and psilocybin to encourage workplace creativity and give them pep and a positive outcome in life overall. Read the rest

Man jailed for a month when cops said his artisanal soap was cocaine is now suing the crap out of them

Soap. Not cocaine.

A New York man who spent a month in jail after Pennsylvania state police mistook homemade soap he was traveling with for cocaine has filed a lawsuit.

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The unusual couple behind an online field guide to psychoactive substances

PHOTOGRAPH BY ANDREW B. MYERS FOR THE NEW YORKER / HAND LETTERING BY MOUSECAKE

In the New Yorker's annual tech issue, Emily Witt profiles the founders of Erowid, "a couple in their mid-forties -- a man and a woman who call themselves Earth and Fire, respectively."

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This trippy 1971 government-endorsed Alice in Wonderland anti-drug film makes drugs look fun

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"Oh! Oh wow! Everythings's different. Even me!"

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