Submit a link Features Reviews Podcasts Video Forums More ▾

Kingdom Rush Frontiers: the best tower defense game now free to play on Web

If you listen to Boing Boing's Apps for Kids podcast, you know that Jane and I love the iOS app, Kingdom Rush, and its follow-up title, Kingdom Rush Frontiers (They are on Android, too!). The object of these tower defense games is to wisely use your treasure to build different kinds of defense towers and to deploy troops to stop oncoming waves of monstrous invaders. The excellent cartoony graphics and elements of humor add enhance this addictive resource-management challenge.

Today, Armor Games announced that Kingdom Rush Frontiers is free to play on its website. From the press release: "The Kingdom Rush Frontiers Flash version features 15 stages set across three unique terrains, with three epic Boss Fights, over 40 enemy types, nine heroes including six that are unlockable through gameplay and plenty of fun Easter Eggs throughout."

Kingdom Rush Frontiers: the best tower defense game now free to play on Web

Kano -- small computer to teach kids programming

This Raspberry PI based computer kit looks like a great way to get kids interested in programming. The programming language looks kind of like Scratch, the free drag-and-drop programming language developed at MIT. A Kickstarter pledge of $9 or more gets you "downloads of the Kano books, OS, and projects. Plus, we'll put your name in our source code."

Kano: A computer anyone can make

Apps for Kids 051: Cookie Clicker


Apps for Kids is sponsored by HuluPlus. HuluPlus lets you binge on thousands of hit shows -- anytime, anywhere on your TV, PC, smart phone or tablet. Click here to support Apps for Kids and get an extended free trial of Hulu Plus.

Subscribe to Apps for Kids

Subscribe in iTunes | Download this episode | Stitcher

Apps for Kids is Boing Boing's podcast about cool smartphone apps for kids and parents. My co-host is my 10-year-old daughter, Jane.

In this episode, we review Cookie Clicker, a game that's free to play on the Web.

We also present a new "Would you rather?" question. Give your answer here:

Read the rest

Apps for Kids 050: Dungelot


Apps for Kids is sponsored by HuluPlus. HuluPlus lets you binge on thousands of hit shows -- anytime, anywhere on your TV, PC, smart phone or tablet. Click here to support Apps for Kids and get an extended free trial of Hulu Plus.

Subscribe to Apps for Kids

Subscribe in iTunes | Download this episode | Stitcher

Apps for Kids is Boing Boing's podcast about cool smartphone apps for kids and parents. My co-host is my 10-year-old daughter, Jane.

In this episode, we review Dungelot, a game that's a mix of Sword of Fargoal, Dungeon Raid, Minesweeper, and an advent calendar. It's .99 on iOS and Android and free to play on the Web.

We also review a new book Jane bought, called Would You Rather...? Wonderfully Weird: Over 400 Crazy Questions! We read one of the questions on the podcast and promised to set up an online poll. Take the poll below!

Read the rest

The Complete Carl Barks Disney Library: Vol 5

Bless Fantagraphics for publishing Carl Barks' duck comics. One of the three original inductees into the Will Eisner Comic Book Hall of Fame (along with Eisner and Jack Kirby), Barks was known for many years only as the nameless "good duck artist" in Walt Disney comic books. His stories read like Indiana Jones adventures, and the art is superb. Just looking at a Barks page make me feel good. My kids and I read Barks' duck comics together, over and over again.

Walt Disney's Donald Duck: Christmas On Bear Mountain is the fifth book in Fantagraphics' Complete Carl Barks Disney Library. Fantagraphics went all out with the production quality in this series: the pages were shot from the original art, and the re-coloring carefully matches the original colors in the comics.

Read the rest

Cool 3-string electric guitar: the Loog

A couple of years ago Rafael Atijas designed a nice 3-string acoustic guitar, called the Loog, and wrote an article about it for MAKE. He launched a successful Kickstarter for it and I have one at home. It's nicely made and sounds great.

Rafael recently launched another Kickstarter for an electric Loog. It looks nice and is well on its way to reaching its funding goal. I want one!

Loog Electric Guitar

Nick and Tesla's High-Voltage Danger Lab: A kids' mystery novel with electromagnets, burglar alarms, and other gadgets you can build

Nick and Tesla are a couple of teenagers who get themselves into trouble and must build MAKE-style projects to save the day. There are two books in the series, aimed at ages 9-12, and they contain a number of fun DIY projects. The publisher, Quirk Books, kindly gave us permission to run a lengthy PDF excerpt from Nick and Tesla's High-Voltage Danger Lab that includes plans for making a compressed-air water rocket.

The forthcoming followup title is called Nick and Tesla's Robot Army Rampage: A Mystery with Hoverbots, Bristle Bots, and Other Robots You Can Build Yourself.

Nick and Tesla Excerpt

Much Loved - stuffed animal portraits by Mark Nixon

Ted | Age: 24 | Height: 9" | Belongs To: Helen Lyons

Much Loved started as a very simple idea: to photograph some "loved to bits" teddy bears for an exhibition in my studio, which happily has a gallery space.

I got the idea from watching my son, Calum. I was struck by how attached he was to his Peter Rabbit, the way he squeezed it with delight when he was excited, the way he buried his nose in it while sucking his thumb, and how he just had to sleep with Peter every night. I vaguely remembered having similar childhood feelings about my own Panda.

The photographer I admire the most is Irving Penn. His portrait work, from the 1940s and 1950s especially, made me want to become a photographer. With his still-life work, I loved the alchemy of his Street Material series, how he could take pieces of trash and cigarette butts off the street, photograph them, and turn them into works of art. The idea of making an everyday object, something so familiar that it's invisible, become visible again appealed to me.

Read the rest

Apps for Kids 049: Video Star (plus a free Boing Boing monkey Minecraft skin!)


Apps for Kids is sponsored by HuluPlus. HuluPlus lets you binge on thousands of hit shows – anytime, anywhere on your TV, PC, smart phone or tablet. Click here to support Apps for Kids and get an extended free trial of Hulu Plus.

Apps for Kids is Boing Boing's podcast about cool smartphone apps for kids and parents. My co-host is my 10-year-old daughter, Jane.

In this episode, we review Video Star, an app that lets you make your own music videos with your favorite songs. It's free in the iTunes store. We also talk about Skindex, a Minecraft skins maker, and present three Minecraft Steve replacement skins that Jane designed, including this Boing Boing monkey.

Subscribe to Apps for Kids

Subscribe in iTunes | Download this episode | Stitcher

Read the rest

Baby reacts with emotional intensity to mom singing song

Video Link. [Alain Leroux, via Joe Sabia]

Super Scratch Programming Adventure! - guide to kids' programming language

Scratch, an excellent and free drag-and-drop programming language for kids developed at MIT, has a new web-based interface. My 10-year-old daughter Jane uses it to create puzzles, games, and interactive cartoons. One thing I like about Scratch is that it's really hard to make a syntax or spelling mistake. The inevitable bugs that arise in a complex Scratch program are therefore more interesting to solve.

Last year I reviewed a terrific introductory book called Super Scratch Programming Adventure!, which teaches Scratch through game programming. There's a new version of the book that covers the web-based Scratch 2, and it went on sale this week.

Super Scratch Programming Adventure! (Covers Version 2): Learn to Program by Making Cool Games

Boing Boing readers' favorite mobile games

On Boing Boing's G+ community, I asked "What is your favorite smartphone game? I have two: Kingdom Rush and Sword of Fargoal." Take a look at the recommendations here.

Apps for Kids 048: Stop Motion Studio (plus Minecraft Contest Winner)


Apps for Kids is sponsored by HuluPlus. HuluPlus lets you binge on thousands of hit shows – anytime, anywhere on your TV, PC, smart phone or tablet. Click here to support Apps for Kids and get an extended free trial of Hulu Plus.

Apps for Kids is Boing Boing's podcast about cool smartphone apps for kids and parents. My co-host is my 10-year-old daughter, Jane.

In this episode, we review Stop Motion Studio, a free iPhone app that makes it easy to create your own stop-motion animated movies. We also present the winner of our Minecraft contest. The winner is 10-year-old Ruby Schweitzer, who created an entire village she calls Klenmeere Woods. See photos of her creation below. Ruby and her dad will be guests on an upcoming issue of Apps for Kids, and Ruby will get a $10 iTunes gift card.

If you're an app developer and would like to have Jane and me try one of your apps for possible review, email a redeem code to appsforkids@boingboing.net.

Jane and I love to get your emails with questions about game, gear, and tech. What's your question?

Listen to past episodes of Apps for Kids here.

To get a weekly email to notify you when a new episode of Apps for Kids is up, sign up here.

Subscribe to Apps for Kids

Subscribe in iTunes | Download this episode | Stitcher

Read the rest

Scientifically accurate get-well card drawn by a little boy for his sister


Courtesy of Lani Horn, aka Mom.

My friend and fellow woman-with-breast-cancer Lani Horn share the following by email, and I asked her permission to post it to Boing Boing because I about died of teh cute. She said:

My kids had the stomach virus this week. Middle kid got it first. Her brother drew her a very literal get well card. On the front: a drawing of her barfing and crying with the words 'Get well.' On the inside: an illustration of macrophages and leukocytes attacking the virus.

Read the rest

Apps for Kids 047: Light-Bot game to teach kids programming


Apps for Kids is sponsored by HuluPlus. HuluPlus lets you binge on thousands of hit shows – anytime, anywhere on your TV, PC, smart phone or tablet. Click here to support Apps for Kids and get an extended free trial of Hulu Plus.

Apps for Kids is Boing Boing's podcast about cool smartphone apps for kids and parents. My co-host is my 10-year-old daughter, Jane.

In this episode, we review Light-bot, a programming puzzle game that uses game mechanics rooted in programming concepts. "Light-bot lets players gain a practical understanding of basic control-flow concepts like procedures, loops, and conditionals, just by guiding a robot with commands to light up tiles and solve levels." It's $2.99 in the iTunes store and $2.99 in Google Play. You can also play it for free on the web.

If you're an app developer and would like to have Jane and me try one of your apps for possible review, email a redeem code to appsforkids@boingboing.net.

Jane and I love to get your emails with questions about game, gear, and tech. What's your question?

Listen to past episodes of Apps for Kids here.

To get a weekly email to notify you when a new episode of Apps for Kids is up, sign up here.

Subscribe to Apps for Kids

Subscribe in iTunes | Download this episode | Stitcher