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Laser-cut birchwood landscape rings


Clive Roddy's Etsy store has a number of beautiful landscape rings made from stacked thicknesses of laser-cut birch, which you can mix and match -- there are houses, trees and mountains (there's also an acrylic tsunami). They're $24 each and ship from the UK.

CliveRoddy (via The Mary Sue)

LED-lit fidget-ring/clock

Ringclock is an Indiegogo-funded, LED-lit stainless steel fidget ring that tells the time. It has a wireless charger and is very handsomely styled -- reminiscent of Kinekt's brilliant gear rings. However, they're sold as "water resistant" and unsuitable for showers or handwashing, which sounds like a recipe for an expensive disaster, especially as they're $235 for pre-order.

Ring Clock (via Red Ferret)

Leather Batman backpack


It's a hefty $299, but it's moulded leather (rrrr), and it's the Batman backpack. A senior toy industry person said to me recently, "Do you know why Batman is such a killer toy, an evergreen seller, and yet Superman is not? No? Externalities. Batman is you - with externalities, like the car, the belt, the cape. (The backpack). Superman's power comes from within, you can never replicate it, but Batman's is all without. You can't be Superman, but you can be the Batman."

Go be the Batman.

Fashion Beast: long-lost, Watchmen-era Alan Moore/Malcolm McLaren comic


Fashion Beast was a ten-issue comic created by Alan Moore and Malcolm McLaren -- the impresario behind the Sex Pistols, who "invented Punk as a Situationist prank." The project began as a screenplay written at the time that Moore was writing Watchmen, and was never produced. Thirty years later, Moore Antony Johnston re-adapted the work for comics, and last September all ten issues were collected in an amazing graphic novel, which I have just inhaled.

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One-minute doc on a man's love for thrifted sweaters

Tonky sends us "Sweater Bender : A minutelong film about one Wisconsin man's love of St. Vincent De Paul and of used sweaters."

Sweater Bender (Thanks, Tonky!)

Revamped Goggle Jacket recreates Italian endurance-race fashion


CP Company worked with the Royal College of Art to recreate and update Massimo Osti's "Goggle Jacket" -- a jacket designed for Italy's Mille Miglia open-road endurance race that ran between WWI and WWII. They modernized the materials, rethought some of the fit issues -- a clever flourish reduces bunching while sitting; another moves the watch-window so you can check the time without moving your hands from the steering wheel -- but still managed to produce something that looks simultaneously futuristic and retro. It's a gorgeous piece of clothing, though £879 is too rich for my blood.

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Bob Basset's Streamline Moto Mask


Bob Basset, my favorite Ukrainian fetish/steampunk leather-mask-maker (admittedly, not a very wide field!) celebrated Christmas by posting this great "Streamline Moto Mask" with removable mouth-guard and goggles. Happy Christmas Sergei, and here's hoping you and your loved ones are safe in this time of upheaval in Ukraine.

Streamline Moto Mask. Art leather.

Bad science stock-art tee


Ape Lad writes, "I have a shirt on sale on shirt.woot tonight, inspired by Maggie's link to awkward science photos. Thanks for the inspiration!"

Star Wars Christmas sweater


Redditor Imnojezus's co-worker made this Star Wars-themed Christmas sweater by felting and tufting the wampa/upside-down Luke scene from "Empire Strikes Back" onto an existing sweater, making a 3D scene. It's not for sale at present, though if it ever does go up on Etsy, I call dibs.

Happy Hothidays (via Geeks Are Sexy)

Cthulhu/Coke tee is back on sale


Following from Tuesday's post about the sadly not-available Cthulhu/Coca-Cola tee, good news: it's back on sale!

Kids' Batman raincoat, with cape


The $30 kids' superhero raincoats come in Batman and Spider-Man -- but the Batman is the clear winner, with its own cape. Bonus: the logos glow in the dark.

Kids' Superhero Raincoats

Skeletal gown with dragon's tail/train



Update: We've got it identified. It's a gown that Taiwanese singer Mei wore to a New Japan Philharmonic Performance by Joe Hisaishi. Well done to Jasonjayr for sleuthing this one out!
Here's one of those frustratingly amazing, but impossible to identify Tumblr finds: a gown with a long train, decorated with the skeleton of a mighty dragon with a barbed tail. My Tineye and Google Image reverse searches just turned up a bunch of people saying, "Hey, that's great, who made it?" and NO ANSWERS.

Do you know? Post in the comments.

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Kinetic solar system jewelry


Norwegian jeweler Miriel Design (AKA Josephine Ryan) has created a bunch of kinetic solar system necklaces, available in her Etsy store. Here's a set of photos of them, and here's her discussion on Reddit. The pieces vary in price, from $380-$500, depending on their complexity, but they're all flat-out gorgeous, and represent a tremendous amount of precision labor.

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HOWTO unshrink a garment

Ever shrunk a garment in the dryer? I'm a laundry freak, and a pretty careful one, but I know I've done it (and inevitably, it ends up ruining something my wife's just bought). Turns out there's a way to unshrink clothes: soak them in baby shampoo or hair conditioner, then stretch them out (ideally, by wearing them) as they dry. Cory 0

What mannequins say about us


Dalí wasn’t the only Surrealist inspired by mannequins, as these two images from the 1938 International Exposition of Surrealism in Paris show. At left, André Breton’s chest with legs, and at right, Sonia Mossé’s altered mannequin.

Wardrobe mannequins have been around since the days of King Tutankhamen, and have been freaking out people ever since. Hunter Oatman-Stanford of Collector's Weekly has an excellent brief history of these silent, ever-vigilant dwellers of the Uncanny Valley.

Cynthia’s face remained completely blank, wearing that same empty stare at the theater, Bergdorf’s, a private dinner party, and even her regular hair salon. Everywhere she went, Cynthia tantalized the paparazzi and her adoring public—always seen on the arm of the fashionable Lester Gaba, wearing the runway’s latest styles and enjoying New York nightlife to the fullest—but still her gaze revealed nothing.

Of course, that’s because Cynthia was a mannequin, crafted by Gaba to promote his retail display business. In 1937, Gaba’s irreverent experiment captivated the public by spotlighting our larger fixation with mannequins, made up of a strange blend of adoration, emulation, discomfort, and sometimes even terror. Cynthia was merely the descendant of a long line of mannequins, whose idealized bodies gave shape to our materialist fantasies at least since the time of the Egyptians.

What mannequins say about us