How to make your own fidget spinner from paper

This cool paper fidget spinner is basically an origami pinwheel, but it's still pretty neat. Read the rest

Guy nearly maims his ladyfriend with rocket-powered fidget spinner

As we descend from Peak Fidget Spinner into its decadent phase, expect to see more of this. The Backyard Scientist discovered that hiding behind a flimsy plastic folding table is no match for rocket-propelled debris from a fidget spinner experiment gone wrong. Read the rest

Do fidget spinners actually help people with ADHD?

Since fidget spinners were originally designed to help people manage their ADHD, BuzzFeed asked people with the condition to try out spinners for a week and report back on their experiences. Read the rest

3D printed fidget-spinner that's also a zoetrope

Jonathan Odom -- aka Jon-a-Tron -- worked out that the fidget-spinner fad has created a world where we're all holding spinny things all the time, and that means we could all be holding amazing, awesome zoetropes! Read the rest

Zoetrope fidget spinner featuring Mario

A Pyro Designs prototyped this ingenious animated Mario fidget spinner, designed by Garrett Kearney. Fidgety zoetropic fun!

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How to make your own fidget spinner without any tools

If Mad Max had a fidget spinner, it would probably resemble this one. Make your own with a bearing, assorted nuts, and a few zip ties. No tools necessary. (MAKE:)

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Watch a fidget spinner spin at 50,000 RPMs... and then break

Just for kicks, Australian auto system manufacturer AXT Turbo put a fidget spinner in a vice and blasted it with an air compressor:

We were playing around with the fidget spinner after work, seeing how fast and what the structural integrity of the unit is. We first started with finger on it until it got a little hot. Then we put in in a vice. After it let go, we calculated it was turning 50000 plus RPM.

(via Laughing Squid)

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Batman symbol fidget spinner cast from brass bullet casings

There's some remarkable craftsmanship at work in this step-by-step video of making a large brass fidget spinner shaped like the Batman logo. The best part is they are giving it away to a viewer.

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Fidget spinners, a brief video history

"Engaging in fine motor activity may assist students with ADHD in resisting the pull of distraction."

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The physics of fidget spinners

Wired's Rhett Allain built a rig with a laser and light sensor to study fidget spinner physics and determine how long it will spin based on the starting angular velocity. Allain's article will make a great teachable moment for my kids, as in I'll ask them to read it and explain it to me. From Wired:

If I know the starting angular speed and I assume a final angular speed of zero radians per second, I can calculate the spin time:

All I need is the angular acceleration—assuming it remains constant as the spinner slows. I could calculate the angular acceleration based on the change in angular velocity, but this isn’t so simple to measure. The spinner moves too quickly to get a good video of its motion, so I will use a laser in a rig I built to measure the change in the angular velocity.

Basically, the laser shines down onto a light sensor. As the spinner spins, it occasionally blocks the sensor, interrupting the laser. By measuring the values from the light sensor, I determine the spin rate. But this creates a couple of problems. First, the light change rate and the rotation rate differ because the three “lobes” in the spinner create multiple openings during each rotation. Second, the spinner will spin for a significant amount of time such that it would be difficult to analyze it all at once...

Now for the fun trick. Instead of looking at a giant plot of light vs. time (the full data is over 2 minutes), I will plot the Fourier transform of this data.

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