Dad encourages his little girl as she hauls in a 5 pound bass with her Barbie fishing pole


“Did I get one?” Um, yeah. Yeah you did, Avery! What a beautiful loving moment between a dad and his daughter. If this doesn't make you smile, you should probably go fishing because it would probably cheer you up. And if this video is later revealed to be deep stealth sponsored content for Barbie, fine, man. Barbie, you win.

[Ram Mehta] Read the rest

“I caught a fish with my drone!”


I believe this to be very likely faked, but nonetheless fantastic. Read the rest

Man catches a fish from high rise balcony


Vitaly Petrukhin says: "In Taiwan in the downtown Keelung, from the terrace of his apartment, a man managed to catch a fish with a fishing pole while the animal is several tens of meters down in a small river. When he feels that he has made, man rewinds the wire on the reel and seems very happy with his decision."

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Dolphins that fish on land.


Amazing video of dolphins that have learned how to dine in style. This hunting behavior, according to Discovery, hasn't been found in any other pod on Earth.

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Massive whale shark lashed to truck

A fisher in China's Fujian province hauling home his catch of the day, a giant whale shark that reportedly weighed two tons and was 16 feet long. Read the rest

Iceland resumes whale hunting, endangered Fin Whale killed

"Kristjan Loftsson, CEO of the the company Hvalur hf." Photo: News of Iceland.

Icelandic news outlets are reporting that an Icelandic whaling company, Hvalur hf, "caught its first fin whale yesterday evening," after sailing out yesterday with two boats, both due back in port today.

Fin whales are the second-largest whale, and are classified as an Endangered species.

From News of Iceland: Read the rest

What you can learn from the million-dollar tuna

On Saturday, a bluefin tuna was sold at Tokyo's Tsukiji fish market tuna auction for $1.76 million. Which is a little crazy. (Also crazy, the size of the fish in question.) But the amount paid for this specimen of a chronically overfished species doesn't really represent simple supply and demand, explains marine biologist Andrew David Thaler. It shouldn't be read as a measurement of tuna scarcity, he says, but rather as an artifact of culture (and marketing). Read the rest