EFF unveils secure, sharing-friendly, privacy-minded router OS

As promised, the Open Wireless Movement's new sharing-friendly, privacy-minded router operating system was unveiled at HOPE X in New York last weekend.

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Snowden will develop pro-privacy crypto tools

He made the announcement at the HOPEX conference in New York this past weekend, calling on other attendees to join him in a project to "improve the future by encoding our rights into programs and protocols by which we rely every day."

(via /.)

(Image: SHH, Liz Welsh, CC-BY)

Open source plasmids: just add bacteria and reproduce at will


John Schloendorn is distributing "open source" plasmids, giving away proteins that normally cost biotech startups thousands of dollars per milligram, ready to be inserted into bacteria and reproduced at will, without any royalties.

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Simplify Email: advanced filtering for any IMAP email

Jeff Reifman's posted a video explaining more about his next-generation IMAP-filtering email project, Simplify Email.

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Massive guide to new Raspberry Pi B+


There's a new Raspberry Pi model out, the B+, and the nice folks at Adafruit have delivered a massive guide to working with the technology (just in time!).

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Twitterbots that tweet anonymous Wikipedia edits from Parliament, Congress

The @parliamentedits account tweets anonymous edits to Wikipedia made from the UK parliament's IP block, and thanks to an open codebase, it's being adapted to watch other legislatures, including the US Congress.

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IRS says free software projects can't be nonprofits

In a disturbing precedent, the Yorba Foundation, which makes apps for GNU/Linux, has had its nonprofit status application rejected by the IRS because some of projects may benefit for-profit entities.

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Open Wireless Movement's router OS will let you securely share your Internet with the world

Open Wireless Movement, a joint project of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, Fight for the Future, Mozilla, Free Press and others, will reveal its sharing-friendly wifi router firmware at the HOPE X conference in NYC next month. The openwireless operating system allows you to portion out some of your bandwidth to share freely with your neighbors and passersby, while providing a high degree of security and privacy for your own communications.


The Open Wireless Movement's goals are to both encourage the neighborliness that you get from sharing in your community, and undermining the idea that an IP address can be used to identify a person, establishing a global system of anonymous Internet connectivity. The project includes an excellent FAQ on the myths and facts about your legal liability for things that other people do with your network.

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SF novel based on free/open game "Project: Starfighter"


Stephen sez, "Around 13 years ago, I wrote a GPL video game called Project: Starfighter. It is a multi-directional shoot 'em up, with an intricate plot and a diverse cast of characters. Since its release, the game has been ported to a great number of platforms, including the Xbox, Pandora, and Sony PSP. It is now maintained on Sourceforge."

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Piratebox 1.0: anonymous, go-anywhere wireless file-sharing

Piratebox, a great project for making standalone wireless fileservers, has gone 1.0. The 1.0 has a slick 4chan-style message board, a responsive UI, and does UPnP discovery for your file-sharing needs. Combined with cheap wireless gear and a little battery, it's a perfect file-sharing boxlet that you can take anywhere in order to share anything -- for example, buskers could use it to distribute copies of their music to watchers. Piratebox is the technology that underlies Librarybox, a fork that is specialized for use by libraries and archives.

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What's the story with the Makerbot patent?

The 3D printing world is all a-seethe with the story that Makerbot supposedly filed a patent on a design from its Thingiverse community. As Cory Doctorow discovered, the reality is a little more complicated: if Makerbot has committed a sin, it is not the sin of which it stands accused.

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Mysterious announcement from Truecrypt declares the project insecure and dead

The abrupt announcement that the widely used, anonymously authored disk-encryption tool Truecrypt is insecure and will no longer be maintained shocked the crypto world–after all, this was the tool Edward Snowden himself lectured on at a Cryptoparty in Hawai’i. Cory Doctorow tries to make sense of it all.

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Openedjam: 3-day event in San Antonio for free/open education activists

Joey writes, "OpenEdJam is a 3-day international event that brings together activists, developers, educators, engineers, librarians, and makers from all fields. We will provide a hands-on environment where participants can collaborate on innovative creations and uses of free and open education resources. Considering the cultural, ethical and technical implications of free and open education resources, we'll come together to discuss, demonstrate and support the future of free and open education. Mariah Villarreal, an undergraduate in San Antonio, TX and AmeriCorps robotics community organizer has put it together. It's amazing to see young hackers out there making noise and keeping the tradition alive!"

OpenEdJam | The Convergent Media Collective (Thanks, Joey!)

Last day of the Novena open source hardware laptop crowdfunding campaign


Just a reminder about the Novena crowdfunding project which closes tonight: this is Bunnie Huang's fully open and transparent laptop, the only computer whose internals can be modified and verified by its users. It's big and weird and fuggly, and it's gorgeous. It's important. I've ordered mine -- this is your last chance to get yours. Bunnie is a virtuoso hardware hacker and a brilliant reverse engineer; he broke the Xbox and wrote an essential book about it.

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Five years of being intimidated by the Harvard Bluebook's copyright policies

Rogue archivist Carl Malamud sez, "For five years, Professor Frank Bennett, a distinguished legal scholar at Nagoya University School of Law, has been trying to add Bluebook Support to Zotero, the open source citation tool used all over the world. Professor Bennett asked Harvard Law Review for permission. They said no. He asked again. They said no again. He secured Larry Lessig as his lawyer. They said no to Lessig. I pitched in and got a bunch of angry letters from the most expensive law firm in Boston. Even a flaming headline in Boing Boing wasn't enough to get the Harvard Law Review off their $2 million/year revenue stream to permit a little bit of innovation. Frank Bennett finally said the hell with it after asking nicely for 5 years, and has now released Bluebook Zotero. It's shameful that Bluebook, Inc. couldn't deal with this situation in a better way."

The Bluebook: A Plot Summary (Thanks, Carl!)