Design your own font easily with Metaflop and Metafont


Metafont makes it easy to create your own typeface: all you have to do is move sliders that alter the geometry until you've got the results you want. Then click "download," and you have your font!

metaflop is an easy to use web application for modulating your own fonts. metaflop uses metafont, which allows you to easily customize a font within the given parameters and generate a large range of font families with very little effort.

With the modulator it is possible to use metafont without dealing with the programming language and coding by yourself, but simply by changing sliders or numeric values of the font parameter set. this enables you to focus on the visual output – adjusting the parameters of the typeface to your own taste. all the repetitive tasks are automated in the background.

The unique results can be downloaded as a webfontpackage for embedding on your homepage or an opentype postscript font (.otf) which can be used on any system in any application supporting otf. Various metafonts can be chosen from our type library. they all come along with a small showcase and a preset of type derivations.

Metaflop is open source – you can find us on github, both for the source code of theplatform and for all the fonts.

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In Google's new logo, serifs a no-go

It's all about looking better on increasingly smaller devices.

Why Impact is the "meme font"

Vox explains how the stout 1965 typeface became the text of choice for internet silliness: because is was included with Windows, and by the time anyone had a choice, "the meme font had itself become a meme." Read the rest

Font censors you as you type


Emil Kozole created Seen, a font that cleverly redacts certain words as you type—a clever automatic ligature hack. It comes in three cuts, with varying degrees of censorship.

Seen is a font that has a preloaded set of sensitive “spook words” that the NSA and other agencies are using to scan through our documents. The typeface can be used in any popular software such as Illustrator, Indesign, Word or in a browser. It is used normally to write text, but once one of the words on the “list” is written - the font automatically crosses it out. Therefore giving you an overview of your text and highlighting where you are potentially prone to being surveilled. It gets its name by a Facebook action that happens when the other user reads the message.

Wired has more.

See also: Christian Naths' Redacted Script, where every character is the same block or squiggle, designed to resemble redacted documents. Designers like them for making placeholder text genuinely abstract. And then there's the Doctors' Typeface. Read the rest

Apple introduces new font: “San Francisco.” Shoulda been called “Francisco Sans.“
The new sans-serif was today made available to devs working on next-gen apps for iOS 9, OS X El Capitan and watchOS 2.

Meet Daniel Reeve, calligrapher for The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings

Artist Daniel Reeve created and re-created calligraphy and maps for Peter Jackson's films of the Tolkein adventures in Middle-earth. His gallery of images includes maps and illustrations as well as calligraphy and lettering. Some examples below:

Daniel Reeve website (h/t TMarizzle) Read the rest

Beautiful short documentary on the art of letterpress


The Folio Society interviewed master printer Stan Lane about the classic craft of letterpress printing. "Feeling print in paper... you know someone's actually been there." Read the rest

Landscape alphabet (c.1818-1860)

In the 19th century, Charles Joseph Hullmandel illustrated a glorious series of landscapes shaped as the letters of the English alphabet. You can see them all in the British Museum's online collection: The Landscape Alphabet (via Juxtapoz) Read the rest

Creating a font from a classic comic

Typographer Nate Piekos describes how he created a 21st-century typeface from a 1980 issue of Elfquest—just in time to begin lettering the comic series' conclusive installment.

Hoefler vs Frere-Jones

The most famous contemporary typeface designers are at legal loggerheads over ownership of their foundry, Hoefler & Frere-Jones. [Fast Co Design] Read the rest

The most popular coding fonts

Slant rounds up the most popular monospace fonts good for cranking code. Adobe's Source Code Pro is top of the pile, but Consolas is only a couple of votes off. My favorite? Orator 10 (not Orator Std), an oldie from the Selectric days. [via HN] Read the rest

Practical Typography

Matthew Butterick offers Practical Typography, a splendid introduction to practical typography. If you enjoy it, he suggests buying one of his fonts. You've heard the name before: his last work was Typography for Lawyers, an excellent guide to typography for lawyers. Read the rest

Courier Prime

@font-face {font-family: 'Courier Prime'; src: url( format('ttf');}

Courier Prime is a new version of IBM's classic public domain typeface, redesigned by Quote-Unquote Apps to look good in print and on-screen. I'm a big fan of the original, whose legendary legibility was hampered by pixelation until "retina" displays came along--so it seems due a comeback! Read the rest

Adobe releases open-source coding typeface

Adobe's Paul D. Hunt announces the company's latest open-source typeface. This one's for coders and anyone else who loves legible monospaced figures—and who hates getting confused between l, 1 and I.

To my eye, many existing monospaced font suffer from one of three problems. The first problem that I often notice is that, many monospaced fonts force lowercase letters with a very large x-height into a single width, resulting in overly condensed letter forms which result in words and text with a monotonous rhythm, which quickly becomes tedious for human eyes to process. The second problem is somewhat the opposite of the first: many monospaced fonts have lowercase letters that leave too much space in between letters, causing words and strings to not hold together. Lastly, there is a category of monospaced fonts whose details I find to be too fussy to really work well in coding applications where a programmer doesn’t want to be distracted by such things.

Download the family at SourceForge. Previously. Read the rest

A handwriting font for doctors

Link to larger size. Created by Orion Champadiyil (web, Twitter).

(via Steve Silberman) Read the rest

Chartwell font turns numbers into graphs

FF Chartwell, designed by Travis Kochel, is a typeface that represents sequences of numbers graphically.

Driven by the frustration of creating graphs within design applications (primarily Adobe Creative Suite) and inspired by typefaces such as FF Beowolf and ­­FF PicLig, Travis saw an opportunity to take advantage of OpenType technology to simplify the process.

Before the True/OpenType era, Beowolf used postscript hacks to render slightly differently every time, creating a uniquely convincing aged effect; PicLig is a pixel font which uses OpenType ligatures to turn certain character pairs into useful symbols.

Chartwell is a more ambitious project than either, and comes in 7 different "weights", each producing a different kind of graph. $130 for the lot, they're $25 each if, say, you only like pies. A web version is under development.

Introducing FF Chartwell [via DF] Read the rest

Hrii Cthulhu, Goka Font Ph'nglui!

Do you love nameless, creeping horrors in the deep? Unnaturally! Do you love fonts? Of course, you do. Thomas Phinney, a veteran type designer, is attempting an unholy union of the two by resurrecting the moldering corpse of three typefaces: Columbus, Columbus Initials, and American Italic. Columbus was used for all the Call of Cthulhu role-playing game, in which Phinney played a hand (severed?), designing clues for "Masks of Nyarlathotep."Back the project on Kickstarter for Phinney to create Cristoforo, modern renditions of these three fonts. Pledges at all but the lowest level come with licenses to use the fonts. Phinney's original work is terrific, and I have no doubt that he'll bring a sensitive hand to re-creating these classic faces. Read the rest

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