Civil War carbine with a "coffee grinder" for corn and wheat


Notwithstanding the rumors of Civil War era carbines with attached coffee-grinders to help soldiers with their bean-juice, the grinder on on this 1859 "Coffee Mill" Sharps Carbine is thought to have been used for corn or wheat.

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Superefficient campstove that charges your phone while it boils water, using only twigs


The superefficient Biolite woodstove will boil water in minutes from twigs and charge your phone while it does it.

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BlackBerry Passport

Passport_Hands_on_Intro-1

It's a giant nearly-square smartphone (or mini-tablet, if you prefer) with a hardware qwerty keyboard and geometric, means-business lines. Coco Currinder from Crackberry has a hands-on preview:

The Passport is a completely different feel when you pick it up. It's not the classic design, not at this size. For a second it felt like I was picking up a sexy new twist to the original Gameboy and that's a compliment. The keyboard has a different feeling too. It's too wide for one hand. The keys are smoother than anything before. They're almost a tad slippery. I've been told that they have been improved upon since this generation of prototype. The backside had a felt-like feeling to it. Not like the Q10, but more like the Z10 and was easy to grip. With a phone this size and weight, the grippiness goes a long way.

I dig it. It's just the sort of thing the street finds its own use for. Whereby "street" I mean, "bloggers."

Paper sculptures and jewelry from discarded books


Book Art Necklace

These paper sculptures made from discarded books are the creation of Malena Valcarcel, whose work includes beautiful sculptures and wonderful, bookish jewelry.

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Zombie eyeball flask


The Zombie Nation, a fabulous webcomic, has its own Etsy store, full of great zombie crafts (the zombie family decals are a steal at $1 each). But my favorite is this zombie eyeball flask -- I bought one from the Zombie Nationals in person yesterday in the Westercon dealers' room.

Optimus Prime cookie cutter


Etsy seller Cookie Prints makes these Optimus Prime Cookie Cutters out of biodegradable PLA.

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Magnificent contraption: vacuum-cleaner/foam-ball particle accelerator

Niklas Roy's DIY particle accelerator contraption is based on vacuum-cleaner-powered pneumatic tube technology, installed in a beautiful glass pavilion located in the middle of a roundabout in Groningen, The Netherlands.

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FDA approves robotic exoskeleton for paraplegics


The FDA has approved Rewalk Robotics' personal exoskeleton for personal use by paraplegics.

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Blackphone: a privacy-conscious phone that actually works


The Blackphone is a secure mobile phone whose operating system is based on Android, designed to minimize the amount of data you leak as you move through the world through a combination of encryption and systems design that takes your privacy as its first priority.

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Folding, 90 micron-thick blankets that fit in your pocket


Matador pocket-blankets are 90-micron-thick nylon blankets with weighted corners to keep them from blowing away and stitched fold-lines for easy refolding.

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Mr Potato Head R2D2


The Mr. Potato Head Star Wars R2D2 goes on sale on July 14 -- happy Bastille Day! Up the rebellion! (via Geekymerch)

New FAA rules class toy UAVs as illegal drones


The latest FAA rules on UAVs are so broad that they class adorable toy quadcopters as drones and require special permits to operate them. Meanwhile, hot air balloons and unpiloted model aircraft are fair game for unlicensed play. The drone hobbyists are pissed:

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How to recreate the sounds of "Forbidden Planet"

In each episode of the Gadgets podcast we recommend technology we love and use. Xeni, Jason, and Mark check out a pro-quality food dehydrator, a camera lens and eyeglass cleaning brush, a cool synthesizer kit, and more!

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US inches towards decriminalizing phone unlocking


America's legal prohibition on phone unlocking has inched almost imperceptibly closer to reform, as a watered-down House bill approaches some kind of Senate compromise, that might, in a couple years, decriminalize changing the configuration of a pocket-computer that you own.

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