This viral photo contains female breasts and hate speech. Guess why Facebook censored it?


Warning: TITTIES.

Nipples, Nazi slogans, and racist slurs against Syrian war refugees have all collided on German Facebook to create the ultimate viral headline, and we at Boing Boing are *so very on it.*

A German photographer came up with a provocative way to pressure Facebook to do something about the recent surge in racist, xenophobic slurs against war refugees. His point: Facebook will censor images of female breasts in an instant, but anti-migrant hate speech is just fine by the social network's terms of use.

So last week, photog Olli Waldhauer posted this photo. The man is holding a racist sign that reads "Don't Buy From Kanaken," which references a Nazi-era slogan about stores owned by Jewish people. “Kanaken” is kind of like the n-word, but for refugees or migrants from the Middle East.

"One of these people is violating Facebook's rules," says the caption, and there's the hashtag #nippelstatthetze ("nipples instead of hate speech").

The image and the story are total viral crack for news outlets in Germany, and hey, we love boobs and outrage here in America too -- as well as our own racism and xenophobia.

Wonder if it'll lead to any change?

More on Verge, Washington Post in English. In German:,

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