Boing Boing 

Custom "Feminist Killjoy" glitter banner


If you don't need this banner, you're probably doing it wrong: $36 from Unicorn Parade of Vancouver. (via Mary Sue)

Overclocked is now a DRM-free audiobook


My multi-award-winning short story collection Overclocked is now a DRM-free audiobook, courtesy of Downpour.com

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Tardis tea-infuser



Made from stainless steel, possibly larger on the inside than the outside, and $20 from Thinkgeek. (via Geeky Merch)

Eat your cereal out of a zombie's rotting brainpan


Or better yet, some kind of greyish custard: $13 from Thinkgeek, dishwasher/microwave safe. (via Geeky Merch)

History of the World in 1,000 Objects

History of the World in 1000 Objects opens up with a simple stone handax for cutting and digging made around 1.65-million years ago and ends, 999 artifacts later, with satellites and smart phones.

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Death Star heart necklace


What could be more romantic than a fully operational battle station? $16.61, ships from Canada, made from polymer clay. (via Geeky Merch)

E=MC2 bowtie


Want to wear a bowtie, but afraid it won't be nerdy enough? The $25 Einstein bowtie is just the thing for you. (via Geeky Merch)

The Graphic Canon of Children’s Literature

Imagine Mark Twain’s Tom Sawyer told in Family Circus comic strip style, Alice in Wonderland’s Alice as a rude fat brat with a Valley-girl accent, Little Red Riding Hood as a young woman who climbs into bed with the Wolf, or Harry Potter told as a comic without words, except for some exclamations and sound affects. Although these mega-popular “children’s” stories have already been recreated by illustrators, artists and filmmakers throughout the years, Graphic Canon presents them and 46 others with a fresh and twisted take by contemporary artists such as Dame Darcy, Lucy Knisely, Roberta Gregory, and World War 3’s Peter Kuper. From Aesop fables and Brothers Grimm tales to The Little Mermaid, Mark Twain’s “Advice to Little Girls,” The Oz series and Watership Down, this fourth volume of Graphic Canon brings us household children’s literature as we’ve never seen it before. This book of children’s literature might not be suitable for children! I would rate it PG-13.

See sample pages from this book at Wink.

Varidesk - excellent adjustable standing desk

I've been using a Varidesk review unit for the past four weeks, and I love it. It's a platform that sits on your existing desk, and allows you to easily raise and lower your computer and keyboard, so you can sit and stand throughout the day.

I typically start my workday standing up, and I'll alternate between standing and sitting an hour at a time. I've been using the Pro Plus model ($350), which is the largest one they make, and I'm glad I didn't get the Single, because I like to keep notebooks, books, iPads, phones, etc. within easy reach. The Pro Plus has enough real real estate to hold that extra stuff on it. The Pro Plus has two platforms – one for the computer/monitor, and another for the keyboard. The Pro model ($300) has only one platform for the keyboard and the monitor, which means you'll have to tilt your head down to look at the display (or elevate your monitor with a stand).

As you can see in the above video, it's easy to raise and lower the platform. You grip the levers on either side and guide the desktop to one of several different locking positions. The hinged braces have springs to assist you, so it's pretty effortless. The fully extended position would probably work with a treadmill, which I want to get soon.

One thing that is a must with a standing desk is an anti-fatigue floor mat. I've been using Varidesk's branded mat ($50) and am pretty happy with it. But after an hour, my heels hurt and I'm ready to plop in a chair.

I've experimented with homemade standing desk contraptions for years, but I always abandoned them after a few months because I didn't like not being able to sit at my desk. The Varidesk solved this problem. I intend to use it for the rest of my life.

I'm having fun with my $10 digital scale that has 0.01g readability

scale-1The AWS 100g x 0.01g Digital Scale ($10) is about the size of an iPhone. I needed a scale to weigh the powdered supplements I take (powders are cheaper than capsules). This scale measures up to a limit of 100 grams in 0.01 gram increments.

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Bifocal safety glasses

I happened upon these Bifocal safety glasses ($11) while on vacation in a hardware store (yes, I go to hardware stores while on vacation). These safety glasses provide great eye protection and the bifocal lens allows me to perform closeup tasks without resorting to pulling them off for my reading glasses. A perfect solution for those who work in a shop with "older" active eyes. – Mark Ramirez [I have a pair of these and love them -- Mark]

Overspray – a book about the airbrush art that defined the druggy seventies

If you’re familiar with LP album sleeves and National Lampoon covers of the 1970s, Overspray will be your time machine to that era. If you are not familiar with them, you will be overwhelmed by these glistening, transrealistic, drugged-out, sexualized images, which incorporate elements from 1900s Art Nouveau, 1920s Art Deco, 1940s cheesecake, and 1960s psychedelia.

Overspray focuses on the top four airbrush artists of the time — Charles E. White III, Peter Palombi, Dave Willardson, and Peter Lloyd, and includes interviews and many examples of their painstakingly-produced work. No artist today can do what these guys did with stencils, liquid paint, and an air compressor.

The book jacket has two covers on one side, and two on the other. You have your choice of which cover to use on the front.

See sample pages from this book at Wink.

I Think You'll Find It's a Bit More Complicated Than That

Over the past decade, pharma-fighting Dr Ben Goldacre has written more than 500,000 words of fearlessly combative science journalism.

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Game Boy Pokemon mugs


Mug Emporium's $12 Game Boy Pokemon mugs come with your choice of Pokemon, though, one supposes, you should really catch them all. (via Geeky Merch)

Tally-Ho playing cards are great for magic tricks

As a practicing magician, playing cards are just one of the many tools in our “magical toolbox.” For the causal card player any pack of cards will most likely do. But for anyone who practices card magic or just plays a lot of card games, cards might be a subject of interest. If you’re looking for quality long-lasting budget playing cards, I highly recommend Tally-Ho cards. They’re inexpensive and can be subjected to being bent and abused, while maintaining their ease of handling. Tally-Hos’ durability can be attributed to its linoid finish, which also helps prevent the cards from sticking together. Unlike most other playing cards such as Bicycles or Bees, Tally-Hos are rather resistant to warping after heavy usage. In fact, a pack of Tally-Hos I own for five years and counting, still springs and fans just like it did first out of the box. -- Jefferson Deng

[The magicians who hang out at The Magic Cafe message board seem to agree that Tally Ho cards are more durable than Bicycle cards. Another interesting thing about these cards is that the Circle back design is slightly asymmetrical, which makes the cards useful for mentalism tricks. The one negative thing about Tally Ho cards is that spectators are usually more familiar with Bicycle cards and unfamiliarity raises suspicions about whether or not a deck is gimmicked. -- Mark] Tally Ho Circle Back Playing Cards ($6)

To Serve Man: it's a notebook!



Thinkgeek's $13 To Serve Man notebook is a replica of the prop used in Damon Knight's classic 1962 Twilight Zone episode To Serve Man.

Damon was one of my Clarion instructors in 1992 and I had the immense pleasure of the Simpsons Treehouse of Horror episode that sent up his script, on the big TV in the common-room. Damon laughed his ass off, I'm pleased to report.

To Serve Man

Marvellous rube goldberg mechanical lightswitch covers


These laser-cut rube goldberg lightswitch plates from Green Tea Jewelry turn your lights into hand-cranked, mechanical delights to rival the very best in novelty switchplates of yore.

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The Paderno spiral vegetable slicer looks shoddy, but it is awesome

paderno-peeler5

The Paderno spiral vegetable slicer is made of plastic and it looks like it would snap into pieces as soon as the crank is turned, but don't let its appearance fool you. This thing has a set of three sharp blade attachments that make short work of sweet potatoes (and, I assume, the sweet potato's evil cousin, the white potato).

paderno-peeler1

Using one of the three blade attachments, you can shred, chip, or thinly slice vegetables. The hand-cranked operation is pleasingly, almost effortlessly, smooth.

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When you are done peeling the potato, you're left with a cute non-hallucinogenic mushroom.

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I tossed a couple of potatoes into a skillet with salt and coconut oil.

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Then I fried the potatoes, gently flipping them from time to time, until a lot of the water burned out and I ended up with with something that looked like bacon and tasted better than bacon. This stuff is crack to me. I could eat it all day, every day.

Paderno World Cuisine Tri-Blade Plastic Spiral Vegetable Slicer ($33)

UPDATE: Xeni has one and reviewed it last year.

Amplified speaker for smartphones doesn't need pairing

speaker

My sister gave me the BoostPlus Near Field Audio speaker for Christmas. I was happy for the kind thought, but since I already have three or four Bluetooth speakers, I wasn't overly excited about getting another one.

But when I used it I learned that it is not like a Bluetooth speaker. It doesn't need to be paired via Bluetooth. You just set your phone on it and it starts playing. This feature makes it a great kitchen gadget. When I'm cooking or washing the dishes, I use it to listen to podcasts and to Spike Priggen's excellent Pop-Psych, Garage & Freakbeat playlist on Spotify. When it's my wife's turn for KP duty, she listens to her podcasts on her phone (she can't be bothered with Bluetooth pairing and so before we got this thing she would just crack up the volume on the phone and listen via the built-in speaker).

The downside is that the audio quality is not as good as a Bluetooth-paired amplified speaker, but for podcast and garage music, I don't care - the convenience factor makes up for the low-fi sound.

iFrogz IF-BSP-GRN BoostPlus Near Field Audio Speaker for Smartphones and Digital Music Players ($23)

Lights and chandeliers made from booze bottles and books


The Moonshine Lamp Company makes beautiful lights out of booze bottles, such as the Crystal Skull Sconce and the eight-bottle chandelier; but they also make lights out of hardcovers, including one made from Jeremy Scahill's superb investigative 2007 book Blackwater. (via Neatorama)

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16-bit game-controller doormat


What says "Speak friend, and enter" more than a $20, 16-bit game-controller doormat? (nonskid, 13.75" x 30")

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Genderswapped 10th Doctor coat would look great as streetwear


At $300, the 10th Doctor Women's Coat is too pricey to be a cosplay accessory, but luckily it's also the kind of very beautiful garment you could wear every day, made from a wool/viscose blend, fully lined, and tailored for easy motion (it reminds me of the streetwear for superheroes from Volante). (via Geeky Merch)

Apollo 11 tracksuit


Thoren's $140 (+$65 SH) Apollo 11 sweatsuit is modelled on the A7-L Pressure Suit, and features fantastic levels of gorgeous, 1969-vintage detail. (via Bonnie Burton)

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Adventure Time hand towels


Your hands will be drier and your heart will sing: $13 on Etsy, also available in Kirby, Finn, and Captain Kirk. (via Geeky Merch)

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Digital rights stickers


Gavriel designed a digital-freedom-themed sticker pack for Discordia Culture; 25% of proceeds from which go to EFF. (Thanks, Gavriel!)

Crypto puzzles and games for kids

Dev Gualtieri's newly published Secret Codes & Number Games: Cryptographic Projects & Number Games for Children Ages 5-16 is a thoughtfully designed introduction to crypto for kids.

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Tights with poetry


The View Text Etsy store sells custom tights emblazoned with poetry from the likes of Emily Dickinson and Shakespeare (you can also get your own text on a pair). (via Geeky Merch)

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Detailed Snowtrooper armor


A mere $2000 gets you this suit of Imperial Snowtrooper couture armor, suitable for fighting asymmetric warfare on Hoth or chilling at a con.

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Lauren Ipsum: The Phantom Tollbooth meets Young Ladies' Illustrated Primer

Lauren Ipsum is an absolutely brilliant kids’ book about computer science, and it never mentions computer science—it’s a series of witty, charming, and educational parables about the fundamentals that underpin the discipline.

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