Seconds, by Bryan Lee "Scott Pilgrim" O'Malley

What do you do for a followup after a triumph like the Scott Pilgrim series? If you’re Bryan Lee O’Malley, you do Seconds, a graphic novel that’s three notches less self-consciously clever, and six notches more heartfelt, smart, and sweet. Cory Doctorow reviews Seconds.

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Kickstarting A is for Zebra, subversive alphabets by Crap Hound's Sean Tejaratchi


It's a twisted, genius alphabet book in the style of Tejaratchi's (more) wonderful found-art collage zine Crap Hound, and published by the brilliant Portland zine store Reading Frenzy; $20 gets you your own copy.

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Steven Gould's "Exo," a Jumper novel by way of Heinlein's "Have Spacesuit, Will Travel"

Steven Gould’s 1993 YA novel Jumper was a spectacular success (even if the film “adaptation” stank on ice), and each of the (all-too-infrequent) sequels have raised both the stakes and the bar for a must-read series. But with Exo, published today, Gould takes his game into orbit — literally.

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Starred review in Kirkus for INFORMATION DOESN'T WANT TO BE FREE, Cory's next book


My next book, Information Doesn’t Want to Be Free, comes out in November, but the reviews have just started to come in. Kirkus gave it a stellar review. Many thanks to @neilhimself and @amandapalmer for their wonderful introductions!

In his best-selling novel Ready Player One, Ernest Cline predicted that decades from now, Doctorow (Homeland, 2013, etc.) should share the presidency of the Internet with actor Wil Wheaton. Consider this manifesto to be Doctorow’s qualifications for the job.

The author provides a guide to the operation of the Internet that not only makes sense, but is also written for general readers. Using straightforward language and clear analogies, Doctorow breaks down the complex issues and tangled arguments surrounding technology, commerce, copyright, intellectual property, crowd funding, privacy and value—not to mention the tricky situation of becoming “Internet Famous.” Following a characteristically thoughtful introduction by novelist Neil Gaiman, rock star Amanda Palmer offers a blunt summary of today’s world: “We are a new generation of artists, makers, supporters, and consumers who believe that the old system through which we exchanged content and money is dead. Not dying: dead.” So the primary thesis of the book becomes a question of, where do we go from here? Identifying the Web’s constituents as creators, investors, intermediaries and audiences is just the first smart move. Doctorow also files his forthright, tactically savvy arguments under three “laws,” the most important of which has been well-broadcast: “Any time someone puts a lock on something that belongs to you and won’t give you the key, that lock isn’t there for your benefit.”

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In the Interests of Safety: using evidence to beat back security theater

“Health and Safety” is the all-purpose excuse for any stupid, bureaucratic, humiliating rubbish that officialdom wants to shove down our throats. In the Interests of Safety, from Tracey Brown and Michael Hanlon, is the antidote: an expert dismantling of bad risk-analysis and a call-to-arms to do something about it, fighting superstition and silliness with evidence.

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Nosferatu's hand belt buckle


Nosferatu's Hand Belt Buckle ($85) -- for when you want people to think of the withered, wrinkled appendages of the ancient undead while looking at your beltular region.

More ugly Christmas sweaters: Satan, Krampus, zombie Santa, D20 -- plus: RUGS!


It's been a year since we featured the amazing, Satan-and-sasquatch themed Christmas sweaters at Middle of Beyond, and they've brought out their new line, which includes a 2D tiger-skin rug, Shining runners, a D20 rug, D20 sweaters, Satanic cardigans, zombie Santa sweaters and so much more. I know what everyone's getting for Krampusmas this year!

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Sonic screwdriver pizza cutter


It talks, too! £10 from Forbidden Planet. (via Geekymerch)

The ineffable joy of transforming boring scientific explanations into exciting comics

Cartooning entomologist Jay Hosler‘s forthcoming young adult graphic novel Last of the Sandwalkers masterfully combines storytelling with science; in this essay, he explains how beautifully comics play into the public understanding of science — and why that understanding is a matter of urgency for all of us.

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XKCD's What If: "Dear Abby for Mad Scientists" in book form

The book-length version of Randall “XKCD” Munroe’s brilliant What-If? column — which features scientifically rigorous, utterly absurd answers to ridiculous hypotheticals — has been on the bestseller lists since it was announced in March. Today, it hits shelves and: It. Is. A. <blink>Triumph</blink>.

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8-Bit Mario pint-sleeves


These sandblasted 8-Bit Mario Pint Glasses are $15 each, with a glass question-mark coaster. (via Geekymerch)

Nerdy shirts, skirts and dresses from Frockasaurus


Etsy's Frockasaurus makes great, pop-culture-inspired clothes for men and women, such as the Men's Star Trek Book shirt and Men's Batman Comics shirt; Hobbit Cover skirt; Legend of Zelda dress; and the Lord of the Rings skirt.

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Gory zombie hoodie with zipover face-mask


Thinkgeek's Zombie Hoodie zips right over your face to form a frightmask -- $50, made of machine washable polyester and awesomely grody.

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Astronomical bedclothes


Chinese Etsy seller Cbedroom makes digitally printed, two-sided, long-wearing satin bedsets bearing astronomical images, with a variety of tints and colors to match different decor, $148 for duvet cover, two pillowcases, and a sheet (top- or fitted). (via IO9)

Lamps made from old game consoles, controllers and accessories


Woody from Oshkosh, WI, makes amazing lamps out of old gaming gear: there's lamps made from NES lightguns, ROB the Robot and Powergloves; stacks of obsolete Nintendo controllers; stacks of obsolete Playstation controllers; NES and controllers; and a PS1 and controllers.

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