Boing Boing 

Flood-hacking in Thailand

Meanwhile, it's still flooding in Thailand. And, after three months of this, the Thai people have been forced to get creative.

Thai Flood Hacks is a Tumblr that feels like a pean to human ingenuity. Here, you will find boats made out of old water bottles. Homemade jet skis. Raised walkways built from shopping carts. Guys just out walking around on stilts. It's amazing. Thai Happy Mutants have pulled off some awe-inspiring instant solutions that allow them to get on with their lives in the middle of an infrastructure-crippling natural disaster.

Via Neatorama

Wizzywig hacker history comic finishes


Ed Piskor, creator of the wonderful Wizzywig hacker history comic, has finally finished the story, which now runs to 412 installments. Ed's done three printed collections of the comic to date, and now promises to finish it in paperback and in limited edition hardcovers. Ed's a great writer, a great storyteller, and a great history of the Internet and hackers, and Wizzywig stands with books like Levy's Hackers and Bruce Sterling's Hacker Crackdown in the annals of hacker lore.

BOINGTHUMP! Chapter 1 Page 1

Hacker stock art

All photos: Shutterstock and Reuters.

Problem: Until they're captured, alleged hackers don't make for stories with good art. But readers won't look at words unless they are immediately adjacent to pictures. Solution: stock art! I am delighted to report that there is an abundance of stock art geared toward illustrating news stories about cybercrime.

Read the rest

Teenager said to be LulzSec's Topiary bailed


Photo: Tim Bradshaw of the Financial Times. Jake Davis, the 18-year-old Briton accused by police of being Lulz Security spokestweeter Topiary, is out on bail. Paul Sawers writes:

The suspected LulzSec member is accused of coordinating Anonymous and LulzSec attacks from his home in Yell, on the Shetland Islands. His laptop was examined and it apparently showed that he wrote a fake article claiming that Rupert Murdoch was dead, and such an article appeared on the Sun’s website recently when its own system was hacked. The hearing today also revealed that Davis’s computer had 750,000 people’s personal details, including private log-in information.
Source [TNW]