Supercut of 80s movies' computer hacking

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A phone slams into an acoustic coupler on the desk. Screeching beeping sounds. Two people sitting side-by-side in front of a computer. One is a socially awkward nerd. The other is cooler, but dumber.

The nerd types something really fast on the keyboard. A rotating Necker cube appears on the green monochrome monitor. SECTOR-INFILTRATE SEQUENCE INITIATED. We see rapidly scrolling strings of hexadecimals reflected in the nerd's wireframe glasses.

“YES! We're in.”

They stop scrolling, and begin to disintegrate, and are replaced by a jolly roger. "HA HA HA!" it says, lower jaw cycling.

"We're in," says the nerd, grinning. "How did you do that!?" interrobangs the cool person. Enjoy this supercut of computer hacking scenes from the 1980s.

[via] Read the rest

Feds used malware to hack child porn network

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It's OK, they're the government. Read the rest

US Army National Guard reveals they, too, recently suffered data breach

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The compromised data includes Social Security Numbers, Dates of Birth, and Home Addresses.

Dictators' favorite surveillance company hacked and exposed online

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"Hacking Team" is a badly-named security contractor that helps governments spy on activists and journalists. It got hacked, badly, and more than 400GB of its data is now public.

Widely shared online, the stolen data includes a list of the countries that have bought Hacking Team's main surveillance tool, Da Vinci, and emails suggesting intelligence agencies use it to spy on activists and journalists. The list includes: Azerbaijan, Chile, Egypt, Kazakhstan, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Spain, Sudan.

… Confirmation of the breach came via the Twitter account of Hacking Team engineer Christian Pozzi.

"We are awake. The people responsible for this will be arrested. We are working with the police at the moment," he said in one message.

Soon after, this and other messages about the breach were removed as Mr Pozzi's Twitter account was deleted.

What better outcome for this company than tweeted authoritarian outrage, sputtering its way into the memory hole. Read the rest

Accused Turkish cybercriminal extradited to U.S. to face charges of hacking ATMs worldwide

Never a good look, at least not to prosecutors.
The so-called unlimited cash out operations used hacked debit cards with withdrawal limits removed to make ATMs spew money.

CNN interview with author of discredited Sunday Times story on Snowden is painful to watch

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If you haven't seen it, you owe it to yourself to do so now.

FBI and DoJ investigating whether St. Louis Cardinals hacked networks of rival Houston Astros baseball team

Players on the St. Louis Cardinals baseball team, high-fiving one another in happier, more innocent times. [Reuters]
Prosecutors say officials hacked into a rival's internal networks to steal valuable private data on players.

On ethics in information technology

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Our field requires ethical frameworks we accept, instead of rules that remain technically unbroken while we hackers violate their spirit with as much ingenuity as we can muster.

To do in LA: screening and Q&A with director of Aaron Swartz doc, "The Internet's Own Boy"

The film has been shortlisted for an Academy Award. After the screening, I will host a question and answer session with filmmaker Brian Knappenberger.

The emergence of science hacking in Madagascar

Ariel Waldman reports on how one of the world's poorest countries is tackling developmental challenges.

Online activism and why the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act must die

MOLLY-LARGE
Courts have appreciated that even distributed denial of service attacks can be legitimate form of public protest. Molly Sauter on the insane U.S. law used to criminalize them and other forms of online activism.

Video: computer hacking in 1980s movies

"80s Computer Hacking: A Supercut." List of movies below: Read the rest

South Korean databases hacked, says US official

A hacking incident may have affected the personal data of thousands of South Koreans employed by the US military. "Gen. Curtis M. Scaparrotti, commander of U.S. Forces in South Korea, apologized Thursday for the 'possible theft' from two databases of private details of South Koreans such as names, contact information and work history," reports AP. Roughly 16,000 current and past workers and others who have sought jobs with the U.S. military in South Korea, are affected. Read the rest

Hackers in Iran set up fake news websites in cyberattack on US

"An elaborate, three-year cyberespionage campaign against United States military contractors, members of Congress, diplomats, lobbyists and Washington-based journalists has been linked to hackers in Iran." The NYT's Nicole Perlroth has more from a report released this week by the Dallas computer security firm iSight Partners. Read the rest

US gov may block Chinese nationals from Defcon hacker event

The US government may use visa restrictions to ban hackers from China from participating in the 2014 Defcon hacker conference in Las Vegas. The move is part of a larger effort by the US to combat Chinese internet espionage.

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China to US over hacking charges: you are 'such a mincing rascal'

The Unit 61398 building in Shanghai that Washington says is the origin of attacks on American computer systems. Photograph: Carlos Barria/Reuters

From the government-controlled China Daily on the recent US charges of hacking by China: "We should encourage organizations and individuals whose rights have been infringed to stand up and sue Washington. Regarding the issue of network security, the US is such a mincing rascal that we must stop developing any illusions about it." Read the rest

US indictment of Chinese hackers is kinda awkward

A map of China is seen through a magnifying glass on a computer screen showing binary digits in Singapore in this January 2, 2014 photo illustration. Picture taken January 2, 2014. REUTERS/Edgar Su.

The Justice Department this week indicted five hackers linked to China’s People’s Liberation Army. The hackers are accused of stealing data from six US companies, and represent a "cyberwar" escalation with China: what was a diplomatic discomfort is now a criminal matter. "But cybersecurity policy-watchers say that the arrival of the indictments in the wake of Snowden’s serial revelations could both lessen the charges’ impact and leave American officials open to parallel criminal allegations from Chinese authorities," writes Wired's Andy Greenberg. Read the rest

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