WATCH: 100 years of hair trends in 1 minute

[via]

Cicada hairstyle

untitledJapanese geek media celeb Shoko Nakagawa enhances her hairdo with cicada shells. (via Dangerous Minds)

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Men's coiffures from the 1960s and 1970s

Yesterday's bad haircuts are tomorrow's (or today's) cool haircuts in San Francisco's Mission or Brooklyn. (via Devour)

Student removed from school lessons after shaving head for charity

Rhys Johnson, 14, shaved his head to raise cash for medical research after three of his relatives were diagnosed with cancer. His school, Milford Haven School in Pembrokeshire, Wales, took him out of class for breaking its "haircut rules," leading to a 250-kid walkout of the school. The BBC reports:

On Thursday, a Pembrokeshire County Council spokesperson said: "School policy is set by a school's governing body and implemented by the head teacher and school staff.

"When this policy is disregarded by a pupil - and in this instance the policy has been clearly communicated to the pupil concerned - the school is acting appropriately in enforcing its policy."

Note the dismissive, yet evasive bureacratic tone! And the fact that the BBC gave an official spokesperson, of a publicly-funded government body, the cloak of anonymity behind which to further criticize a child.

Aevin Dugas has the world's largest afro

Four foot, four inches in circumference. "She believes her voluminous hair may have grown even bigger, but she cannot reveal its size until Guinness take an official measurement." [Video Link, Daily Mail]

Baltimore hair stylist tries her hand at archaeology

Here's a nice reminder that an expert is only "an expert" in their specific, narrow field, and (more importantly) everybody in an expert in something. A Baltimore hair stylist has helped archaeologists better understand how Roman and Greek women achieved some of the complicated, towering hairdos depicted in sculpture and paintings. How? She experimentally demonstrated that the word most scientists had been translating as "hairpin" probably should be translated as "needle and thread".

Villain hair

"Possession of a terrible haircut is the Hollywood litmus test for evil" [The Awl]

Extreme space age hairdos of yesteryear

Presumably this old Pathe reel showing women getting huge armatures with planetoids on them inserted into their hair by men wielding combs with sparklers on them and strange electric shock devices is some sort of elaborate piss-take. Though maybe I'm wrong and there was a time when the women of Wokingham, Berkshire, really did wear their hair that way.

Space Age Hair Fashions (via The Mary Sue)

Stary eyeball hair


An unsourced photo on Biglilkim's Tumblr shows a woman whose back-flip has been turned into an awesome, starey eyeball. Anyone know more about the picture?

(via Neatorama)

Update: In the comments, Copacetic says, "Yes. The stylist's name is Seaborn (known as Celebrity Seaborn) and the woman in the photo is known as Pastor Dot or just Dot. He has a Youtube Channel and Dot is very well know for wearing some of his most outlandish hairstyles. There is actually a video of this style. You can find it here."

Uterine fibroids, hair relaxers, and why some evidence is better than others

There's a story making the rounds right now suggesting that the use of hair relaxers—products that are used more often by African American women than women of other ethnicities—might cause uterine fibroids—a painful condition experienced more often by African American women than women of other ethnicities.

Nobody really knows why African American women seem to be more prone to uterine fibroids, and, on the surface at least, this connection seems like it might make sense. Relaxers and other products contain hormones and chemicals that act like hormones. So, maybe, those things are getting absorbed into the body and leading to the growth of fibroids.

Trouble is: That's just speculation. And the evidence used to back it up is pretty flimsy. The study this story is based on looks at nothing but broad correlations: African American women have more fibroids and African American women use more of these hair care products. That's a problem, because broad correlations can be really, really misleading.

At The Urban Scientist blog, Danielle Lee (a scientist who has experience with both fibroids and hair relaxers) talks about why the "evidence" being presented in this case isn't even close to the same thing as "proof".

Parabens and phthalates can do some funky things. (I don’t trust these chemicals.) They are problematic and should be evaluated for safety, especially by the US Food and Drug Administration. Parabens can be an estrogen mimic – but only slightly it seems. But it’s everywhere – not just in Black hair care products like shampoos and perms. Parabens are preservatives in cosmetics and pharmaceuticals, so it’s in lotions, shaving gel, KY Jelly, makeup, even in food. Phthlates are what make plastics flexible, transparent, durable and strong. Exposure to these chemicals is coming from who-knows-how-many-sources: those dissolving plastic pill caplets, adhesives in bandages, toys, food packaging, even textiles, and paint.

My problem with this study is that it doesn’t eliminate all of these confounding and possibly conflicting variables. Again, what was the reason for hypothesizing hair care products for the disparity? It’s a leap – a huge leap and the data just doesn’t convince me. In my opinion, finding strong correlations of relaxer use among African-American women who happen to have fibroids is an artifact. Culturally, getting relaxers is a very typical hair-care regime among adult black women today. It’s a cultural phenomenon. So is being ashy and using lotion — which potentially has the same possible EDC risks as hair care products. These studies fall far short in making a connection between high occurrence of uterine fibroids and hair care rituals of Black women.

I see Lee pointing out a couple of problems here. One: A correlational study like this doesn't account for many, many other ways women might come into contact with the hypothetical causal agent. So it doesn't make much sense to tie causality to one, single source. Two: In a correlational study with this many variables, the connection you see might not mean what you think it means. The authors of this paper wonder whether hair care products might be causing fibroids. Okay. But it could be just that women who are more likely to have fibroids also, coincidentally, are part of a culture that uses a lot of these hair care products.

Correlational studies are important. They're a good first step in noticing patterns that can tell us something important about human health. But correlational studies can't be thought of as "proof" of anything. They're a way to notice a problem exists. But they aren't a good way of solving problems.

Unfortunately, correlational studies, like this one, make the news a lot. And, when they do, they're treated as though they represent scientific proof. That's a problem. Even if you don't have fibroids or use hair relaxers, you should read Danielle Lee's full post on this study. It'll give you a better idea about the sorts of questions you should be asking every time you see a scary science headline in the newspaper.

The the full story at The Urban Scientist

Image: Conditioning Lourdie's Hair 1002132, a Creative Commons Attribution (2.0) image from stevendepolo's photostream