Help Conjurer's Kitchen create Death in Chocolate

Annabel de Vetten was trained as sculpture and painter, but after making her own wedding cake, she found a new passion in life: confection. Annabel's creations aren't ordinary at all, as seen previously, and she works creating molds from the things she loves. Skulls. Animals. Horror films. Whatever takes her fancy.

But making awesome chocolate creations isn't easy. To make truly amazing and consistent chocolate, a professional tempering machine is necessary. Help make the world of chocolate a better and more beautiful place by supporting Annabel's Death in Chocolate Kickstarter.

Chocolate Vincent Price life mask. Read the rest

How humans evolved to explore

Boldly going where nobody's gone before. In a lot of ways, that idea kind of defines our whole species. We travel. We're curious. We poke our noses around the planet to find new places to live. We're compelled to explore places few people would ever actually want to live. We push ourselves into space.

This behavior isn't totally unique. But it is remarkable. So we have to ask, is there a genetic, evolution-driven, cause behind the restlessness of humanity?

At National Geographic, David Dobbs has an amazing long read digging into that idea. The story is fascinating, stretching from Polynesian sailors to Quebecois settlers. And it's very, very good science writing. Dobbs resists the urge to go for easy "here is the gene that does this" answers. Instead, he helps us see the complex web of genetics and culture that influences and encourages certain behaviors at certain times. It's a great read.

Not all of us ache to ride a rocket or sail the infinite sea. Yet as a species we’re curious enough, and intrigued enough by the prospect, to help pay for the trip and cheer at the voyagers’ return. Yes, we explore to find a better place to live or acquire a larger territory or make a fortune. But we also explore simply to discover what’s there.

“No other mammal moves around like we do,” says Svante Pääbo, a director of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, where he uses genetics to study human origins.

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