Boing Boing 

Randomized dystopia generator that goes beyond the Bill of Rights


Sumana writes, "I was talking with a friend about trends in dystopian fiction, and about the underappreciated rights that don't get as much airtime. So I created Randomized Dystopia. You can hit Reload on the main page to get a right from the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, or use the Custom Terribleness page for the option of a specifically sexist or ageist dystopia."

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How medical abortion works


The latest Oh Joy Sex Toy webcomic covers medical abortion in its signature style: humane, thorough and approachable.

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Kickstarting a new edition of Lord of the Fries


The classic Cheapass Game is getting a second life, with a brand-new second deck, thanks to you and Kickstarter!

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Nagra IV-L: the pinnacle of tape recorder UI


A design classic from 1968, with all the dials, knobs, switches and buttons you could possibly need.

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Auctioning art from an MC Frontalot video for EFF

Artist Chad Essey sez, "I'm auctioning some animation frames from the music video for Shudders I created for MC Frontalot's Question Bedtime album, with proceeds to the Electronic Frontier Foundation."

Chocolate megalodon teeth for the Easter Dinoshark


Cast from a real fossil dino-shark tooth, available in milk, dark and white chocolate, just in time for Easter. (via Bruce Sterling)

Hacking a laser-cutter to play real-world Space Invaders

Martin sez, "I just completed my silliest projects to date: while running the risk of turning my laser cutter into a giant fire ball I actually succeeded in turning it into a real world version of the Space Invaders game."

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Gamer jewelry


New Zealand jeweler Charlie Meaden's OG gamer pieces include these shiny game-controller earrings and the Space Invaders ring, both available in gold or silver. (via Geeky Merch)

Star Trek sushi set


The beams of blue spacewarp light on Thinkgeek's $35 Star Trek U.S.S. Enterprise Sushi Set detach from the Enterprise's nacelles to form chopsticks, while the saucer section unscrews to form a soy sauce dish. (via Geeky Merch)

Burning Man temple to heal Ireland's Troubles, IRL and in Minecraft


David Best, who builds the enormous, gorgeous temples at Burning Man each year, created "Temple" in London/derry, where survivors of the Troubles have left memorials to their dead in advance of the temple being burned on Mar 21.

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Kickstarting a documentary about the San Diego underground scene

Noah Swartz writes, "Last night I got a chance to see a screening of It's Gonna Blow, a documentary about the underground scene in San Diego directed and produced by Bill Perrine."

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Interpenetrated coin art


Robert Wechsler makes sculptures by notching and connecting coins to one another to great effect, thanks to the familiarity of the materials and the seeming impossibility of their arrangement.

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Girl-friendly middle-grades science fiction anthology

Corie Weaver, co-editor of the Young Explorer's Adventure Guide a middle grade reader featuring diverse protagonists, sez: "31 percent of children's books have central female characters, and even fewer feature main characters of color."

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Beauty tips for male Lego execs


Hugh writes, "Lego published annoying 'beauty tips' for young girls; Elbe Spurling has a nice response: beauty tips for male Lego executives."

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Following the key Trans-Pacific Partnership senator with a 30' blimp

Evan from Fight for the Future writes, "The folks who wrote SOPA are trying to get extremist copyright provisions into the secretive Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement -- the one that Congress is trying to 'Fast Track' right now."

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Playing the unplayable Death March (but not releasing the penguins)


John Stump's 1980 composition Faerieā€™s Aire and Death Waltz (from 'A Tribute to Zdenko G. Fibich') is a parody of a composition and not intended to be played -- but someone did!

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Hoax photos of real events


Jojakim Cortis and Adrian Sonderegger normally produce beautiful commercial photos, but their hobby is recreating iconic photos -- the Hindenberg's explosion, Nessie 1934, Tiananmen 1989, 9/11, and more -- in miniature, so that their replicas are virtually indistinguishable from the originals.

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