Every movie out this holiday season: 'Silence,' 'Star Wars,' 'Doctor Strange,' 'Fantastic Beasts,' 'Assassin's Creed'

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Yep, all in one place: a list of every movie coming out this holiday season.

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When was "going to the beach" invented?

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Until the 18th century, the seashore was not a place most people would go to relax. In ancient times, it was where you might run into a variety of monsters like Scylla and Charybdis. The shore is also where one might encounter pirates, smallpox, or even a wayward Kraken. Then something changed. Sorbonne University historian Alain Corbin explores this unusual history in the book The Lure of the Sea: The Discovery of the Seaside in the Western World, 1750-1840, one of the sources for a fascinating Smithsonian magazine article about "Inventing the Beach":

Around the mid-18th century, according to Corbin, European elites began touting the curative qualities of fresh air, exercise and sea bathing. Especially in Britain, home of the Industrial Revolution, aristocrats and intellectuals became preoccupied with their own health and hygiene. They viewed workers, whose numbers were multiplying in factories and new industrial towns, as strengthened through labor. By comparison, the upper classes seemed fragile and effete: lacking in physical prowess and destined for decline. The notion of the “restorative sea” was born. Physicians prescribed a plunge into chilly waters to invigorate and enliven. The first seaside resort opened on England’s eastern shore in the tiny town of Scarborough near York. Other coastal communities followed, catering to a growing clientele of sea bathers seeking treatment for a number of conditions: melancholy, rickets, leprosy, gout, impotence, tubercular infections, menstrual problems and “hysteria.” In an earlier version of today’s wellness culture, the practice of sea bathing went mainstream...

Tracing this remarkable turnaround, “the irresistible awakening of a collective desire for the shore,” Corbin concludes that by 1840, the beach meant something new to Europeans.

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MAKE: a tiki-mug menorah

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Polyhai's tutorial for creating a tiki-mug menorah is all the sholem aloha you need for eight nights of candlelit grog-swilling. Read the rest

Menorah bong makes Hanukkah a "high holiday"

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The festival of lights, indeed. (Thanks, Jordan Kurland!)

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Celebrate July 4th with a PES animated classic!

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"Fireworks," a classic from 2009 by PES. Happy Independence Day! Read the rest

Dogs and cats hate holiday fireworks. Here are 3 tips to protect your pet on July 4th.

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Advice from the Humane Society that might save your pet's life.

Boing Boing Gift Guide 2013

Welcome to this year's Boing Boing Gift Guide, a piling-high of our most loved stuff from 2013 and beyond. There are books, gadgets, toys, music and much else besides: click the categories at the top to filter what you're most interested in—and offer your own suggestions and links!

Fireworks by PES

"Fireworks," a classic from 2009 by PES. Happy Independence Day! Read the rest

Robo-Santa and his Meccano tree, 1960

From vintage ad enthusiast Paul Malon's superb Flickr stream, this 1960 holiday season cover from science fiction magazine Galaxy. He has another one with two aliens sneaking up on Christmas, and a stressed-out interstellar Santa.

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Santacon 2012: Why the nose, Santa?

SantaCon 2012, official "Why the Nose" edition, San Francisco. Music by Kevin MacLeod, video by Mark Day.

Tiny holiday scenes starring Star Wars advent calendar minifigures

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Boing Boing reader J5K of Helsinki, Finland picked up a LEGO 2012 Star Wars Advent Calendar 9509, and has been setting up and photographing cute little holiday scenes with the minifigs. He shared some in the Boing Boing Flickr pool, and you can view them all here.

at-at walker, Star Wars Advent Calendar - Day 10. Photo: J5K. Read the rest

Thanksgiving: time to revisit classic Sarah Palin turkey-death video

Time to trot out a turkey classic.

BB Readers' DIY Costumes: Fish-Man from Ugly Americans

In our Epic Halloween DIY Costume thread, Boing Boing reader Sarah Pérez shares these images and says,

This year I have become Fish-Man! The idea was inspired by the fish-man character, Toby, in the show Ugly Americans. I think the idea of a fish wearing pants is pretty hilarious, and luckily the costume turned out to be as funny as I hoped it would. I've already worn it out on the bus and train home from work and it made quite a few smiles all around :)

The head is chicken wire, screen door mesh, paper mache, foam and fabric. I also had to special order some very large pants which I velcroed to the fish head. Oh, and the eyes light up too-- they're those battery-operated closet push-lights ;)

I'll be walking in the 16th Annual Halloween on Halsted Parade this Wednesday in Chicago at 7pm CST. Hope to see you Chicago readers there-- Happy Halloween!

Her video of fish-man in action below. Read the rest

BB Readers' DIY Costumes: Marshall Lee + Fionna from Adventure Time

In our Epic Halloween DIY Costume thread, Boing Boing reader slippy0 shares these snapshots and says, "Mine really isn't that fancy, but the stars aligned and gave me a week of time to work on props. I was Marshall Lee from Adventure Time, and decided to make his axe-bass instead of just painting a 2D cutout. The results aren't amazing, but they're more than I planned to do, and very DIY. I went with my friend who was Fionna. We got a lot of compliments. :) " Read the rest

BB Readers' DIY Costumes: Living Roy Lichtenstein painting, by Gina Menduni

BB reader Gina Menduni made this genius Roy Lichtenstein costume for Halloween 2012. We are gobsmacked, Gina! Thanks for sharing it in the epic DIY Halloween costume thread! Read the rest

Open thread: your DIY Hallowe'en costumes?

Each year here at Boing Boing, we invite you, dear readers, to share your plans for fun home-made costumes. So what's it gonna be? Frankenstorm Sandy? A Mars Rover? Honey Boo Boo? Do tell, in the comments.

Woodring iPhone case

Twig Case Co. in Minnesota makes nice iPhone cases out of paper and bamboo, including this beautiful Jim Woodring model, called "Frank in the Tempest."

The founder of Twig Case, Jon Lucca, is an illustrator, too, and I really like his art on "The Bunker" bamboo case. I saw a little easter egg in it that made me smile! (Click thumbnail for enlargement.)

(UPDATE: use the code 'boingboing' and get 20% off anything until the end of the month.) Read the rest

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