Johnny Depp's joke about assassinating Trump makes White House "sad."

Last night at the UK's Glastonbury Festival, Johnny Depp asked this rhetorical question of the crowd: "When was the last time an actor assassinated a President?"

I believe that the answer is April 14, 1865, when actor John Wilkes Booth murdered Abraham Lincoln.

The White House's response to Depp's comment? "Sad."

According to an official White House statement, "President Trump has condemned violence in all forms and its sad that others like Johnny Depp have not followed his lead. I hope that some of Mr. Depp's colleagues will speak out against this type of rhetoric as strongly as they would if his comments were directed to a democrat elected official."

Secret Service staff assistant Shawn Holtzclaw told CNN that they are aware of the matter but can't comment further.

UPDATE: Johnny apologized.

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Bat-Signal to shine over Los Angeles in memory of Adam West

The iconic bat-signal will shine on the tower of Los Angeles City Hall tonight in memory of Adam West, the (best) Batman actor who died on Saturday. L.A. Mayor Eric Garcetii and L.A. Police Department Chief Charlie Beck will flip the switch at 9pm at City Hall. From the Hollywood Reporter:

For fans who can't make it to the ceremony, West's family is encouraging people to donate to the Adam West Memorial Fund for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Donations can also be made to Camp Rainbow Gold, an Idaho-based charity for children battling cancer.

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You could own the light-up dance floor from Saturday Night Fever

The fantastic light-up dance floor from Saturday Night Fever (1977) will go up for auction in a couple of weeks. The 24' x 36' floor, outfitted with more than 250 lights, was built and installed at Brooklyn's 2001 Odyssey nightclub specifically for the film. When the place closed in 2005, former employee Vito Bruno bought it. Auction house Profiles in History expects it to fetch $1 to $1.5 million.

Can you dig it? I knew that you could.

(Reuters)

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Watch the final Wonder Woman movie trailer

Wonder Woman hits theaters June 2. Looks like a rather intense three hours, yet I still wish it was Lynda Carter, in her satin tights, fighting for our rights, and the old Red, White and Blue.

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Jonathan Demme, director of "Silence of the Lambs" and "Stop Making Sense," RIP

Jonathan Demme, the talented director of Silence of the Lambs, Philadelphia, Something Wild, Talking Heads' Stop Making Sense, and numerous other great films, has died at 73. His death was caused by esophageal cancer. From the New York Times:

A personable man with the curiosity gene and the what-comes-next instinct of someone who likes to both hear and tell stories, Mr. Demme had a good one of his own, a Mr. Deeds kind of tale in which he wandered into good fortune and took advantage of it. A former movie publicist, he had an apprenticeship in low-budget B-movies with the producer Roger Corman before turning director...

Mr. Demme’s other films include documentaries about the folk-rock singer and songwriter Neil Young; concert films featuring the country singer Kenny Chesney and the pop star Justin Timberlake; and “Swimming to Cambodia” (1987), Spalding Gray’s monologue ruminating about Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge and his experience appearing in the film “The Killing Fields.”

Mr. Demme was a member of the alternative arts scene of Lower Manhattan, which included Mr. Gray, who died in 2004, as well as Mr. Byrne and the composer and performer Laurie Anderson, who scored “Swimming to Cambodia.”

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The Silence of the Lambs, a romantic comedy

"Quid pro quo – I tell you things, you tell me things."

Edited by Jon Tomlinson; Narration: Andy Geller; Executive Producer: Dustin McLean (CineFix)

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Screenwriters share the deranged comments they get from Hollywood people

At The Wrap, Oscar-nominated writers share some of the dumbest notes left by studio people on their scripts. They range from merely heavy-handed ("There is no wife. Continue.") to idiotic ("Where are the white people?" regarding Moonlight.)

Remarks hinting at someone's gender or race are striking: it's that familiar vicariously-bigoted voice: with Hollywood folk you can never quite tell if it's their voice, the voice of viewers they imagine and fear, or simply a voice they've heard and rehearsed so many times they don't even know anymore, and all they do know is that they have to listen to it.

But it's also true that many of the remarks aren't like that at all. They're just nuts, especially when they come from Kevin Costner. Read the rest

Shia LaBeouf's new film's gross in the UK: $26

Shia LaBeouf's new movie Man Down grossed just $26 during its UK run which, in fairness, was only playing at one theater once each day. But still. From the Hollywood Reporter:

"I think we've sold three tickets in total," the cinema manager told the Hollywood Reporter, adding that she hadn't "experienced anything like it before."

The manager said Man Down would end its weeklong run in Burnley's Reel Cinema this Thursday, "highly likely" without any further purchases being made, a move that would see the film's U.K. theatrical total max out at £21 ($26.20), rather less than the $454,490 it earned following a limited theatrical run in the U.S. last December. Read the rest

Superhero portraits composited from faces of actors who played them

Posted to r/interestingasfuck by redditor Got2ReturnVideoTapes. Read the rest

Adam Savage goes behind the scenes of Ghost In The Shell

Adam Savage visits with Weta Workshop's Richard Taylor for a glimpse of the mecha-geisha masks, animatronic amazement, and far-out fabrication that brought the new Ghost in the Shell film to life. Directed by Rupert Sanders and starring Scarlett Johansson and Pilo Asbaek, Ghost in the Shell hits theaters in a month. Trailer below. (Tested)

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Watch Carrie Fisher roast George Lucas

Carrie Fisher kills it at the American Film Institute's 2005 Life Achievement Award honoring George Lucas.

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Zsa Zsa Gabor, 1917-2016

Actress and socialite Zsa Zsa Gabor is dead at 99, her publicist said Sunday. The Hungarian-born American actress appeared in more than 73 films and married nine times. Here she is ripping off Johnny Carson's pants in 1964. Read the rest

Making of the creatures in Rogue One: A Star Wars Story

Enjoy this "creature featurette" with director Gareth Edwards and Creature Effects Supervisor Neal Scanlan introducing us to the strange characters in Rogue One: A Star Wars Story.

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Han Solo and Princess Leia had an affair, for real

In Carrie Fisher's new memoir The Princess Diarist, she writes that she had an affair with Harrison Ford while they were filming Star Wars: Episode IV – A New Hope (1977). From CNN:

"It was so intense," Fisher told People magazine. "It was Han and Leia during the week, and Carrie and Harrison during the weekend..."

Fisher was 19 when she landed the breakthrough role of Princess Leia for the 1976 filming. Ford, then 33, was married to Mary Marquardt, with whom he had two children.

Fisher writes that she and Ford spent their first night together after a birthday party for director George Lucas.

"I looked over at Harrison. A hero's face -- a few strands of hair fell over his noble, slightly furrowed brow," she wrote. "How could you ask such a shining specimen of a man to be satisfied with the likes of me?"

"I was so inexperienced, but I trusted something about him," she added. "He was kind."

The Princess Diarist by Carrie Fisher (Amazon) Read the rest

WATCH: Trump's Hollywood Walk of Fame star destroyed

Dominic Patten reports that Donald Trump’s Hollywood Walk of Fame star was destroyed early Wednesday morning by a man dressed as a city construction worker.

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Women villains as role models

Tired of lady villains being given pathetic, exploitative backstories to justify and explain their wicked ways? Sarah Gailey writes In Defense of Villainesses: women who are flawless, ruthless and require no pathological explanation.

We love her and we hate her in equal measure. We feel that way because she revels in being all the things that we are told we aren’t allowed to be. She is confident, and she has wrinkles, and her nose isn’t a formless nonthreatening comma in the middle of an ill-defined wide-eyed face—it’s a knife, or an arrow, or a scythe. She frowns. Everyone in the audience and on the internet wants to talk about whether or not she’s sexy but they’re asking the wrong questions and she’s laughing at them for it. She wears bright colors, nonprimary colors that coordinate with her green skin or her purple eyeshadow. She’s too good for this game, too smart for her boss, tired of getting stepped on. She gets mad and she gets even.
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Are Leonardo DiCaprio and Robert Downey Jr white enough to star in a Hollywood biopic of medieval Muslim poet Jalaluddin al-Rumi?

The producers of a Hollywood biopic about 13th-century poet Jalaluddin al-Rumi hope to cast Leonardo DiCaprio in the role—and they're eyeing Robert Downey Jr. for the part of "enigmatic mystic" Shams of Tabriz. Read the rest

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