The Right Way To Do Wrong, Houdini on deception


The Right Way To Do Wrong presents a unique opportunity to experience Harry Houdini in his own words. A collection of the master magician's interviews of police, grifters, swindlers, and criminals of all sort. These papers also give a fantastic glimpse into Houdini.

I expected another dreary book of magic, written in dated English, with references to things I'd never understand. What I found is a fascinating collection of captivating essays that also open a window into who Harry Houdini was! While I very much enjoyed hearing stories about how turn of the century pick-pockets plied their trade, I also learned that Houdini has a goofy sense of humor. Peppered with corny jokes and oddball witticisms, we not only learn the secrets to some of histories greatest magician's tricks, but get a glimpse into the author.

For fans of magic, or just budding con-men, I highly recommend The Right Way To Do Wrong.

The Right Way to Do Wrong: A Unique Selection of Writings by History's Greatest Escape Artist (Neversink) via Amazon Read the rest

Eerie lifelike sculpture of Harry Houdini


He's been dead since Halloween, 1926, but Harry Houdini just won’t die. The old bastard really won’t go away.

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Houdini could fly!

In 1910, Harry Houdini magically flew over a field near Melbourne, Australia. OK, he was in an airplane. But I hadn't known that the great magician was an aviation enthusiast. Houdini's demonstration was the first heavier-than-air flight in Australia. Apparently, it was a real nail-biter that ended in success. Now, Smithsonian Air & Space reports on the effort to find Houdini's plane, if it still exists.

He flew a Voisin biplane that he’d bought in Germany the year before. Powered by a British ENV engine capable of 60 to 80 horsepower, it sailed over trees, rocks, and fences, reported the Melbourne Argus, then wavered slightly. “Ah! Cabre, cabre!” shouted Antonio Brassac, Houdini’s French mechanic. “The word signifies the action of a rearing horse,” continued the Argus, “and it indicates that the plane, like the horse, will almost inevitably come to grief.”

"The Hunt for Houdini’s Airplane" Read the rest