My card trick book is on sale for 99 cents

I became interested in magic when I was a young teenager, then dropped out for one reason or another. About five years ago I started getting interested again, this time in card magic (as opposed to stage magic). I had fun making doctored cards to use in my tricks, so in 2015 I wrote and illustrated a self-published ebook called Trick Decks: How to Hack Playing Cards for Astounding Magic. The sales exceeded my expectations, and it was at the top of the "magic" chart in Amazon for a quite a while.

Occasionally I reduce to price of the book. For the next few days, I've dropped the price of the ebook from $2.99 to 99 cents. It will go to $1.99, then back to $2.99.

Trick Decks will show you how to easily make different kinds of trick card decks to perform stunning magic tricks. You can make the decks from ordinary playing cards and easy-to-find tools and materials. No special skills are required and these cards are fun to make.

In this ebook you will learn The best way to mark cards How to make a stripper deck that lets you pull selected cards from the middle of the deck Two ways to make one of the greatest trick decks of all time: The Invisible Deck How to make the Brainwave Deck: A spectator’s thought-of card is the only one face up in the deck and with a different colored back than the other cards Nightmare Card: A card chosen by the spectator vanishes and reappears in your pocket Find out more about the ebook at Trick Decks website. Read the rest

A travel diary how-to

In this relaxing video, YouTuber Jordan Clark talks through her process for making a keepsake travel diary. Read the rest

How to be a warm person

In this animated video, the YouTube channel The School Of Life breaks down the ways in which politeness isn’t necessarily the same thing as warmth. It turns out the secret to being a warmly polite person ultimately comes down to paying attention to other people’s vulnerabilities and needs.

[via Laughing Squid] Read the rest

How to get your baby to help you wash your car

This is the latest in a series of “instructional” videos from New Zealand dad Jordan Watson. Here’s another:

And one more:

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Breed and publicize your own congenitally deformed celebrity cat

Breed and Publicize Your Own Congenitally Deformed Celebrity Cat by Frank Tuplin and Dorris LaForge. Buy your copy here. Read the rest

How to paint realistic creature fur

Artist Nate Hallinan has a good tutorial on painting creature fur in Photoshop. Read the rest

Make a temperature-sensing mini-blind controller

Steve Hoefer is one of my favorite makers (check out his other projects for MAKE here). He writes: "I built this mini blind minder to open and close [my window blinds] automatically. It’s powered by an Arduino microcontroller, which uses a temperature sensor to read the room temperature and then activates a servomotor to open the slats when it’s too cool and close them when it’s too warm. It has an adjustable thermostat and it can also be operated manually to open or close your blinds with a push of a button."

Here's how to build your own Mini Blind Minder Read the rest

How to walk on ice

Infographic by Curtis Whaley. (Via Mental Floss) Read the rest

How to tell whether a mosquito is male or female (without getting bitten)

The mosquito on the left is a male Aedes aegypti mosquito. The mosquito on the right is his female counterpart. Viva la difference— and the difference is in the antennae.

How to clip your fingernails in space

Astronaut Chris Hadfield shows us how to clip your fingernails in space! It's a bit different in zero gravity.

Button making kit for kids

In this short video, Jane shows how to use the Sukie Button Factory to make fabric-covered buttons.

MAKE Weekend Projects - Monkey Couch Guardian

I invented the Monkey Couch Guardian, and wrote a how-to so you can build one, too.

Combine an Arduino with a proximity sensor, and make an obnoxious device to discourage cats and other fur-shedding pets from jumping on beds and couches. This project will also introduce you to the SPDT relay, a fundamental component of hobbyist electronics projects.
Monkey Couch Guardian: complete instructions Read the rest

How to flip food in a pan (Video)

[Video Link] You aren't supposed to lift the pan. You're supposed to slide it back and forth. Thanks, Chef John! (Via Doobybrain) Read the rest

How to: Read the abstract of a scientific research paper

Abstracts are summaries — the short paragraph that usually explains the question a study was asking and the answers it found, plus a brief overview of what methods the researchers used. Because most peer-reviewed scientific research papers sit behind big, awkward pay walls, abstracts are often the only part of the paper that you, the general public, can easily read. That's why it's important to know what to look for in an abstract and how to interpret the information you read there. Noah Gray, a senior editor at the journal Nature, put together an introduction to abstracts. It's online at The Huffington Post. Read the rest

Casey Neistat's guide to not sucking so bad on Instragram

[Video Link] I like using Instagram when I'm traveling (see my photos here). David also is an Instagram user. I picked up some good tips on this video, "Casey Neistat's guide to not sucking so bad on Instragram." I especially liked the part where he compares Ricky Rozay's Instagram feed (very good) with Justin Beiber's (bo-ring).

But do I really have to go easy on the tilt-shift filter, Casey? Read the rest

How to build "The Most Useless Machine"

A couple of years ago I was on The Colbert Report showing some fun projects from MAKE, and Stephen fell in love with a project called "The Most Useless Machine." (Watch the episode here.) The Most Useless Machine is a box that shuts itself off when you turn it on. (After the show Stephen hinted that he wanted to keep it, so I gave it to him and he was really happy.)

Make:Projects just posted complete instructions for making your own Most Useless Machine. It's the simplest version yet, and is sure to bring a smile to the face of anyone who tries it.

Last year I saw a video of the "Leave Me Alone Box" built by Michael Seedman. Flip its switch on, and an arm reaches out of a door to turn the switch back off. To paraphrase The Terminator, that's what it does, that's all it does, and it will not stop until its circuit is dead.

I had to have one of my own, so I made one. Seedman's design uses a microcontroller to run two servomotors: one to open the lid, and another to push the switch. This makes for an impressive performance, but seemed too complicated, and actually, his circuit remains powered even when the box is idle.

For existential purity, I wanted a super-simple machine that really turned itself off. So I came up with a single-motor design controlled by a 555 timer chip, with a curved arm that both lifts the lid and flips off the switch.

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How to make bicycle handlebars that light-up

[Video Link] Our pal Becky Stern shows you how to make LED bike handlebars using nifty LED tape. Read the rest

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