Gilliamesque – Terry Gilliam's pre-posthumous memoir is as unique as the man himself


See sample pages from this book at Wink.

Terry Gilliam’s memoir is as unique as the man himself. Known for his work with Monty Python and as a director of films like Brazil, Time Bandits, and Twelve Monkeys, Gilliam’s work has always had a surreal quality that makes it instantly recognizable. His “Pre-posthumous Memoir” happily possesses a similar quality.

Most authors would write a memoir that is a prose account of their life, and maybe they would include a couple pictures of the highlights for added effect. Gilliam, originally a cartoonist and animator, naturally flips this idea on its head and sticks pictures all over the book, drawing attention to them with handwritten notes. Sometimes the pictures are a direct reference to the text, sometimes they are tangentially related to the text, and occasionally they have no apparent connection to anything outside of Gilliam’s head.

What we get reads less like a book and more like a collage of many art pieces. The actual text of the memoir ends up being just one piece of many that ties the others together. You could probably only read the handwritten notes and pictures and still get a good sense of Gilliam’s life and personality. The pictures scattered throughout the book are a collection of old family photos, sketches, illustrations, magazine ads, set photos, and more. Gilliam’s early years in advertising and comedy magazines include some of the most surprising work, with hints of what the artist Gilliam would later become. Read the rest

Psychedelic Space Alien themed Art Deco style 1931 high school yearbook


Pea Hicks writes, "This is an album of scans I made from the 1931 Los Angeles University High School, CHIEFTAIN - 'Martian Number.'" Read the rest

Usborne releases free PDFs of its classic 1980s computer programming books


Jindo Fox writes, "A few years ago, Cory linked to some wonderful pictures in Usborne's 1983 classic Introduction to Machine Code for Beginners. Usborne has made PDF copies available of their whole line, with the only restriction that you link to their page, not to copy and redistribute the files themselves. Very cool. I have fond memories of wasting my childhood typing these listings into the mainframe terminal at my local university, and later on my Timex Sinclair 1000, which I somehow knew was the American version of the ZX-81 that was featured in these pages." Read the rest

Kellie Strøm's Worse Things Happen At Sea


If you love, or fear the ocean, Worse Things Happen At Sea is the art book for you!

This doubled sided panorama illustrates man locked in battle with the terrors of the deep. Kellie Strøm spent over 2 years working with a magnifying glass and insanely fine ink pens to create these beautiful illustrations.

Kellie Strøm's Worse Things Happen At Sea via Amazon Read the rest

The first drawings of neurons

In 1837, Italian physician Camilo Golgi devised a reaction to stain the wispy dendrites and axons of neurons, making it possible to see brain cells in situ. In 1875, he published his first scientific drawing made possibly by his chemical reaction, seen here. It's an illustration of the never fibers, gray matter, and other components of a dog's olfactory bulb. "The First Neuron Drawings, 1870s" (The Scientist) Read the rest

T-shirt: Bugs and Gossamer as Han and Chewy

Scoundrels (1)

Deep Fried Art's t-shirt "Scoundrels" ($20 with shipping) depicts Gossamer (the Looney Toons monster) and Bugs as Han and Chewbacca: "I wonder what their ship would look like? The Millenium Carrot??" Read the rest

Great cover for a 1960 scifi paperback


The Unexpected Dimension is a 1960 paperback anthology of science fiction short stories by Algis Budrys. It only merits 3 out of 5 stars on Goodreads, and even this 5-star review on Amazon gives me pause: "Budrys is a difficult writer. It usually takes several readings before you can really understand what is going on in his stories." I'll pass, but I give the cover illustration by John Blanchard 5 stars! Check out a few of his other covers here:

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Line-art: squirming criminals in an authoritative hand


In 1948, the Institute of Applied Science commissioned an unknown illustrator to depict a fistful of squirming, terrified criminals caught in an authoritative fist, under the headline "CAUGHT BY THEIR FINGERTIPS" -- they were advertising a home Criminal Investigation and Identification course. Read the rest

Wreck It Ralph/Fury Road mashup


By cpartsalot, who notes: "I have a theory that the reason they have yet to have an official sequel announcement is because the scriptwriters are busy trying to slip in as many Mad Max references as possible past the censors." (via Seanan McGuire) Read the rest

Molly Crabapple's illustrations from Syria


The illustrator collaborated with Syrian writer Marwan Hisham (a pseudonym), who sent her mobile-phone photos from Syria that she used as the basis for a striking and moving series of illustrations for a Vanity Fair feature. Read the rest

Gallery: Outside the Lines Too, more adult coloring brilliance


Souris "Hustler of Culture" Hong has followed up on her amazing 2013 coloring book Outside the Lines with a second edition: Outside the Lines Too. Read the rest

The shape of the Internet (according to patent drawings)


The stylized art of patent drawings is instantly recognizable. Before the information age, the drawings were drafter's jewelboxes, designed to make the workings of new mechanical inventions legible to other inventors (and patent examiners). Read the rest

Younger Bill Gates poses with older Bill Gates


Fulvio Obregon, an illustrator from Cali, Colombia, created a series of portraits that show younger and older versions of the same celebrity as if they are in the same room together.

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Wonderful alphabet of superhero letters


Australia-based illustrator Simon Koay reimagined the letters of the English alphabet as superheroes. Read the rest

Mid-Century Misery: the discontented delights of Stevan Dohanos

Dohanos was a prolific American painter and illustrator with over 125 Saturday Evening Post covers to his credit. Read the rest

Fury Road, hieroglyph edition

By @takumitoxin, who composed it in three fits. Read the rest

Little Robot: nearly wordless kids' comic from Zita the Spacegirl creator

Kid or adult, parent or not, you should already be reading Ben "Zita the Spacegirl" Hatke for some of the most rollicking, science-fictional kid-friendly comics between two covers, but now you've got no excuse: Little Robot, a nearly wordless graphic novel about a little girl and a fugitive robot, will fill you with terror, laughter, wonder and joy.

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