Boing Boing 

Spotters' guide to UFOs, 1967


Found in Bruce Sterling's tumblr: UFO typologies, 1967

Miyazaki beer label


I could (and probably will) write an essay about all the ways in which the Ghibli Museum in Tokyo is amazing and totally different from the usual museum (shortlist: limited capacity managed through waiting lists instead of price-hikes; exhibits that are intended to be handled, even the fragile ones; no cult of personality for founders; emphasis on both wonder and production; modest and beautifully stocked shop; overall non-commercial emphasis; quirkiness that is commensurate with the actual films), but for now, I'll leave you with this: the beautiful Miyazaki-esque beer-labels from the hot-dog and ice-cream stand.

Miyazaki beer label, Ghibli Museum, Tokyo, Japan

Wearable computing breakthrough

An image from the future past.

(via via @stevenf)

Olaf as Disney princesses


Olaf, the living snowman from Frozen, is pretty much the greatest comic-relief sidekick in animated history. Tortallmagic has made him even better by imagining him as an ambulatory misshapen snowman cosplaying Disney princesses. They're the roles he was born to play.

Olaf as some of the Disney Princesses!!!!!! (via Neatorama)

There's a painted woman in this moth

Paul Roustan is an incredible body-painter who produces brilliant optical illusions. In this video, he shows how he's painted a model to blend seamlessly into this image of a pandora sphinx moth; when she emerges from the still, it's a pure mind-blower. This (NSFW) gallery of his work shows off his incredible versatility and virtuosity.

When You See It…

British science fiction pulp covers: Gernsback continuum from an alternative universe


Here's a smashing gallery of British science fiction and science pulps from the golden age of sf. These are recognizably of a piece with the American pulps of the era, but are also distinctive in every way: line, color-choice, subject, typography, composition and character design. They are a divergent, parallel universe to the American Gernsback continuum, and all the more striking for it.

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Disney's Nine Old Men: box-set of flipbooks

In January 2013, Disney Animation Studios released a box-set of nine flip books that pay tribute to the "Nine Old Men" of Disney animation -- artists who pioneered the animation techniques that define the field even today. I only just found out about these today -- they're amazing. Each book shows the animation as line-art, really capturing the character and movement the animators imbued their creations with. This video does a good job of showing off the books. The box also includes a short explanatory book, but this isn't really about reading material -- the value is all in having the cel-by-cel line art to marvel upon.

Walt Disney Animation Studios The Archive Series Walt Disney's Nine Old Men: The Flipbooks

Pinterest board full of nostalgic D&D art


Brad sez, "Trusty Sword, an Olympia, WA-based RPG developer, has posted hundreds of scanned D&D cover art from dndclassics.com [a site where you can buy all the classic D&D modules and books as ebooks, though some are larded with DRM] to Pinterest. It's awesome."

D&D 1.0 (AD&D) Cover Art on Pinterest (Thanks, Brad!)

Disney characters as zombie hunters


Deviant Art's Kasami-Sensei has produced a series of illustrations that mashup The Walking Dead with Disney characters, recasting the familiar lighthearted animated figures as post-apocalyptic zombie-hunters.

The Walking Disney (via Neatorama)

Bad arguments, great illustrations


Hugh sends us An Illustrated Book of Bad Arguments: "This book is aimed at newcomers to the field of logical reasoning, particularly those who, to borrow a phrase from Pascal, are so made that they understand best through visuals. I have selected a small set of common errors in reasoning and visualized them using memorable illustrations that are supplemented with lots of examples. The hope is that the reader will learn from these pages some of the most common pitfalls in arguments and be able to identify and avoid them in practice."

The ebook is gorgeous, and it's available on a name-your-price basis in Spanish and English. There are also print editions in several languages.

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Polygon-art Star Wars character cushion-covers

On Etsy, The Retro Inc sells a nice line of custom-sized cushion slips screened with polygon art renderings of Star Wars characters. They range from $34-$42 depending on size.

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Mary Blair gallery show at Walt Disney Family Museum in San Francisco


San Francisco's Walt Disney Family Museum is running an exhibition on the art of Mary Blair, one of the all-time greats of Disney history and modernist illustration and color. I've covered her work here before (for example, there's a gorgeous collection of Blair's Golden Books, and, of course, the amazing Alice in Wonderland edition featuring the rejected concept art she produced for Disney's psychedelic Alice in Wonderland animated film), and I've been lucky enough to see some of it in person while I was working at Disney, but this exhibit, called "MAGIC, COLOR, FLAIR: the world of Mary Blair," looks extraordinary.

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Beautiful, illustrated vintage Wisconsin postcard


Phil Are Go has done the world the kind service of posting a hi-rez scan of a gorgeous, vintage souvenir of Wisconsin postcard, lavishly and wonderfully illustrated with everything the state has to offer.

Wisconsin, your post card is here.

Chestburster Onesie

This Alien chestburster onesie was drawn by comics creator Mike Dougherty for a baby-shower. (via Geeks Are Sexy)

Zbrush meets the Monster Manual


Patrick Farley, a wonderful comics creator whose work we've been covering for more than a decade, has taken to Twitter to show off his Zbrush recreations of the monsters from the original Dungeons and Dragons Monster Manual. (Thanks, Stefan!)

Corporate mascots as anime characters


Bruce Yan has created some gorgeous anime-inflected remixes of traditional American logos, including the Girl Guides Scouts and Starbucks. Astro Boy/Atom Boy was really born to be Bob's Big Boy mascot.

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Salvador Dalek

"Salvador Dalek" is a long-running t-shirt gag (here's another variant, one from Threadless, an old Ebay auction... there's certainly many more!). I like it a lot. (via Wil Wheaton)

Win $1000 for your NSA Surveillance cartoon

From Global Voices Online: "The Web We Want invites cartoonists, creatives and artists to join The Day We Fight Back on February 11, 2014 by creating an original cartoon about online surveillance and the right to privacy. The cartoons should help increase awareness about the NSA and demand accountability for mass digital surveillance in a way that makes people want to click and share."

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Massive collection of Soviet wartime posters


The University of Nottingham's Windows on War is one of the world's premier collections of WWII Soviet posters related to their war with the Nazis on the eastern front. The scholarly notes that accompany the exhibit are a treat, though they are presented in a way that makes it nearly impossible to read them. But the entire collection has been scanned and posted, and is available for viewing at very high resolutions.

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More Victorian portraits of "London types"


Spitalfields Life has posted more Victorian portraits of London characters and tradesmen a (here's the last batch). The new set has some absolute gems, including the Muffin Man (above). Also not to be missed (below): "itinerant," "lounge lizard," and "portcullis raiser at the bloody tower."

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Mechanisms: steampunk armored bestiary


Vladimir Gvozdeff's illustration series Mechanisms depicts a wonderful bestiary of armored, mechanical creatures in steampunk style, surrounded by the detritus of contrafactual Victorian inventorship. Some of my favorites after the jump:

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Mr Chicken: the genius who paints London's fried-chicken signs


London's fried chicken restaurants are a bizarre and wonderful institution -- generally, they have American-ish names (Dixy Fried Chicken, Southern Fried Chicken, Carolina Fried Chicken) and KFC-ish logos, all carefully titrated to be just far enough from the KFC version to keep the Colonel's savage attack-lawyers at bay. I photograph these places semi-compulsively, but I never knew (until today) that all their signs were designed by a single virtuoso fried-chicken sign-painter named Morris "Mr Chicken" Cassanova, who warrants his own chapter in Siâron Hughes's 2009 book Chicken: Low Art, High Calorie. A post on Creative Review excerpts Hughes's interview with Mr Chicken:

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Portraits of London's 19th century poor


Thomas Lord Busby's 1820 volume Costume Of The Lower Orders was part of a genre of books that featured colourful paintings depicting working people in the streets of London, generally viewed through the lens of an aristocratic voyeur. They're a kind of visual companion to Mayhew's classic London Labour and the London Poor (though this latter dates 20 years after Busby's book).

Another important volume is Thomas Rowlandson's Characteristic Series of the Lower Orders, which Spitalfields Life has excerpted in two posts (1, 2).

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Pulp Fiction edition of Guess Who? (unofficial)


Joe Stone helped a lucky friend celebrate a birthday with a custom, Pulp Fiction-themed edition of "Guess Who?", packaged in a replica of Marcellus Wallace's briefcase. As with all such projects as these, it's the attention to detail that makes the difference, giving this the appearance of having sprung from an alternate universe in which it was a real product. It's design fiction from a parallel time-track.

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Odd, bilious guts (and porny donuts)


Scott Teplin posted Bile to the Boing Boing Flickr Group, along with a link to his wonderful series of watercolors called Future Trash, full of wolvertonian, anatomical oddments. This is my kind of grotesque! He also has a nice line of porny donuts [NSFD].

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Crowdfunding a new Geek-a-Week deck

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/lenperalta/geek-a-week-year-five-two

Len sez, "Back in 2010, I spent one year interviewing and drawing 52 geeks. I called the project Geek A Week. During that first year, I was able to interview some of the brightest luminaries in the geek world including Stan Lee, Neil Gaiman, Kevin Smith, Guillermo Del Toro even Boing Boing's own Cory Doctorow. Earlier today, I launched a new Kickstarter campaign to do it all over again."

$25 gets you a PDF and $42 gets you a printed deck.

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Brilliant NSA scandal illustrations


Stephen Levy's Wired feature How the NSA Almost Killed the Internet is a masterful summary of the NSA scandal to date and its fallout, but even better are Christoph Niemann's, Zohar Lazar's, and others' graphics, which are the best NSA-scandal illustrations to emerge since Hugh D'Andrade's NSA/ATT eagle.

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Futuristic armor for organs


Viaframe's renders of armor for your organs are sure pretty. I think they'd be a little terminal for everyday use, but they'd make great canopic storage for the old burial chamber-oonie.

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High-rez scan of Poe's "Raven," illustrated by Dore


The Library of Congress's website hosts a high-resolution scan of a rare edition of Edgar Allan Poe's "The Raven" illustrated by Gustave Doré. The title-page is at page 11, the list of illustrations is on page 14.

The illustrations are amazing, like no other illustrated Poe I've seen. I've collected my favorites below, and there are a lot of them -- honestly, it was impossible to choose.

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Clever Popeye forearm tattoo


This very clever Popeye tattoo has unclear provenance -- apparently the artist is Russian tattoo artist Alina Fokina from Ufa, Russia, possibly with help from Jaksic Milan.

(via Neatorama)