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Corporate mascots as anime characters


Bruce Yan has created some gorgeous anime-inflected remixes of traditional American logos, including the Girl Guides Scouts and Starbucks. Astro Boy/Atom Boy was really born to be Bob's Big Boy mascot.

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Salvador Dalek

"Salvador Dalek" is a long-running t-shirt gag (here's another variant, one from Threadless, an old Ebay auction... there's certainly many more!). I like it a lot. (via Wil Wheaton)

Win $1000 for your NSA Surveillance cartoon

From Global Voices Online: "The Web We Want invites cartoonists, creatives and artists to join The Day We Fight Back on February 11, 2014 by creating an original cartoon about online surveillance and the right to privacy. The cartoons should help increase awareness about the NSA and demand accountability for mass digital surveillance in a way that makes people want to click and share."

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Massive collection of Soviet wartime posters


The University of Nottingham's Windows on War is one of the world's premier collections of WWII Soviet posters related to their war with the Nazis on the eastern front. The scholarly notes that accompany the exhibit are a treat, though they are presented in a way that makes it nearly impossible to read them. But the entire collection has been scanned and posted, and is available for viewing at very high resolutions.

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More Victorian portraits of "London types"


Spitalfields Life has posted more Victorian portraits of London characters and tradesmen a (here's the last batch). The new set has some absolute gems, including the Muffin Man (above). Also not to be missed (below): "itinerant," "lounge lizard," and "portcullis raiser at the bloody tower."

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Mechanisms: steampunk armored bestiary


Vladimir Gvozdeff's illustration series Mechanisms depicts a wonderful bestiary of armored, mechanical creatures in steampunk style, surrounded by the detritus of contrafactual Victorian inventorship. Some of my favorites after the jump:

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Mr Chicken: the genius who paints London's fried-chicken signs


London's fried chicken restaurants are a bizarre and wonderful institution -- generally, they have American-ish names (Dixy Fried Chicken, Southern Fried Chicken, Carolina Fried Chicken) and KFC-ish logos, all carefully titrated to be just far enough from the KFC version to keep the Colonel's savage attack-lawyers at bay. I photograph these places semi-compulsively, but I never knew (until today) that all their signs were designed by a single virtuoso fried-chicken sign-painter named Morris "Mr Chicken" Cassanova, who warrants his own chapter in Siâron Hughes's 2009 book Chicken: Low Art, High Calorie. A post on Creative Review excerpts Hughes's interview with Mr Chicken:

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Portraits of London's 19th century poor


Thomas Lord Busby's 1820 volume Costume Of The Lower Orders was part of a genre of books that featured colourful paintings depicting working people in the streets of London, generally viewed through the lens of an aristocratic voyeur. They're a kind of visual companion to Mayhew's classic London Labour and the London Poor (though this latter dates 20 years after Busby's book).

Another important volume is Thomas Rowlandson's Characteristic Series of the Lower Orders, which Spitalfields Life has excerpted in two posts (1, 2).

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Pulp Fiction edition of Guess Who? (unofficial)


Joe Stone helped a lucky friend celebrate a birthday with a custom, Pulp Fiction-themed edition of "Guess Who?", packaged in a replica of Marcellus Wallace's briefcase. As with all such projects as these, it's the attention to detail that makes the difference, giving this the appearance of having sprung from an alternate universe in which it was a real product. It's design fiction from a parallel time-track.

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Odd, bilious guts (and porny donuts)


Scott Teplin posted Bile to the Boing Boing Flickr Group, along with a link to his wonderful series of watercolors called Future Trash, full of wolvertonian, anatomical oddments. This is my kind of grotesque! He also has a nice line of porny donuts [NSFD].

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Crowdfunding a new Geek-a-Week deck

Len sez, "Back in 2010, I spent one year interviewing and drawing 52 geeks. I called the project Geek A Week. During that first year, I was able to interview some of the brightest luminaries in the geek world including Stan Lee, Neil Gaiman, Kevin Smith, Guillermo Del Toro even Boing Boing's own Cory Doctorow. Earlier today, I launched a new Kickstarter campaign to do it all over again."

$25 gets you a PDF and $42 gets you a printed deck.

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Brilliant NSA scandal illustrations


Stephen Levy's Wired feature How the NSA Almost Killed the Internet is a masterful summary of the NSA scandal to date and its fallout, but even better are Christoph Niemann's, Zohar Lazar's, and others' graphics, which are the best NSA-scandal illustrations to emerge since Hugh D'Andrade's NSA/ATT eagle.

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Futuristic armor for organs


Viaframe's renders of armor for your organs are sure pretty. I think they'd be a little terminal for everyday use, but they'd make great canopic storage for the old burial chamber-oonie.

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High-rez scan of Poe's "Raven," illustrated by Dore


The Library of Congress's website hosts a high-resolution scan of a rare edition of Edgar Allan Poe's "The Raven" illustrated by Gustave Doré. The title-page is at page 11, the list of illustrations is on page 14.

The illustrations are amazing, like no other illustrated Poe I've seen. I've collected my favorites below, and there are a lot of them -- honestly, it was impossible to choose.

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Clever Popeye forearm tattoo


This very clever Popeye tattoo has unclear provenance -- apparently the artist is Russian tattoo artist Alina Fokina from Ufa, Russia, possibly with help from Jaksic Milan.

(via Neatorama)