Exaggeration postcards: sight-gags-by-mail

Retronaut rounds up a series of "exaggeration postcards" from 1907-1967, representing a golden era of visual-comedy-by-mail. Hard to characterize the Texas Jackalope card as an "exaggeration," though -- it's more of an out-and-out lie (albeit a beautiful one).

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The Art of Neil Gaiman

Hayley Campbell (who, at age seven, worked side-by-side with her father Eddie Campbell on the graphic novel classic “From Hell”) has recently published a gorgeous, authoritative book on the myriad artworks created to accompany Neil Gaiman’s many works. We proudly present several extracts from her book here.

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Skeletons in space-suits


The Skeletons in Space Suits is a fabulous collection from a very diverse set of sources. I'm sure they could use your contributions -- do you have anything that'd work?

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Saga Volume Three: weird all the things!

It’s been nearly a year since the publication of volume two of Brian K Vaughan and Fiona Staples’ spectacular Saga comic; but at last, volume three is at hand. As Cory Doctorow discovered, it was well worth the wait.

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Cognitive Bias Parade: CC-licensed collage illustrations of predictable irrationality

James Gill writes, "Cognitive Bias Parade is a site that takes a daily look at deviations in judgement and reconstructed realities. It is an illustrated review of the many ways the brain has evolved to lie to itself. It is not simply meant to scold. The spirit of the project was captured once in a quote by the magician Jerry Andrus: 'I can fool you because you're a human. You have a wonderful human mind that works no different from my human mind. Usually when we're fooled, the mind hasn't made a mistake. It's come to the wrong conclusion for the right reason.'

"I've given a Creative Commons Share-Alike status to my work on the site. I ask only that a link-back be given for my website as credit."

(Above: Observation selection bias... The effect of suddenly noticing things that were not noticed previously – and as a result wrongly assuming that the frequency has increased.)

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Visualizing inspiring quotes about privacy


Kevin writes, "With the Privacy is a right project I try to visualize the global privacy debate by using quotes on the subject and turn them into large (in real life) visuals. I started out with key figures in this debate (such as Edward Snowden, Kirsty Hughes and even Cory Doctorow) but now everyone can react and share their view on the subject by submitting a quote on the site. Any inspiring quote will then be turned into art by me. Some of the visuals will be part of my graduation exposition (25th - 29th of June) for the Willem de Kooning Rotterdam University of Applied Sciences in Rotterdam, the Netherlands."

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Prints that peer into 8-bit game characters' lurking anxieties


Christopher Hemsworth's Dear Inner Demons -- Retro Video Game Edition is a series of prints (8"x8", $16) in which we learn about the deep insecurities of our favorite olde fashioned video-game characters.

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Princess Leia as a Haunted Mansion stretch-portrait


Deviantart's Khallion (who has quite a line in Princess Leia remixes) has posted this Haunted Mansion stretch-gallery/Star Wars mashup that seems to have dropped in from an alternate universe in which the Mansion gets a Star Wars skin. Not that I'd want such a thing to be an annual event, but one special May the 4th event would be something fine indeed.

Leia's Corruptible Mortal State (via Super Punch)

Glorious sf movie posters of the heroic age


Obviously, many things are better now than they were in the 50s and 60s, but clearly science fiction movie posters have fallen from glory. Here's Dark Roasted Blend's gallery of amazing and gorgeous sf movie posters and lobby cards from the great, lost heroic age.

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Crowdfunding an illustrated A-Z defending libraries

Gary sends us, "a library crowdfunding project I am involved with. It is aiming to creatively highlight the value of public libraries to those who believe they are outdated or irrelevant. This is particularly important at the moment as many local authorities are closing libraries and reducing their hours, as a result of cuts in central government funding."

I put in £20!

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Disney tarot


D'Morte, the Arch-Druid of Tinver Moor, created this Disney Major Arcana, "based on Golden Age Disney works from Snow White through to the Rescuers." Messr D'Morte notes that he was "influenced by the Marseilles deck, while adding a Jungian interpretation to many of the images."

These are inspired. Click through for The Hanged Man, which all but skewered me on its brilliance (though The Fool, above, is a close second).

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Spotters' guide to UFOs, 1967


Found in Bruce Sterling's tumblr: UFO typologies, 1967

Miyazaki beer label


I could (and probably will) write an essay about all the ways in which the Ghibli Museum in Tokyo is amazing and totally different from the usual museum (shortlist: limited capacity managed through waiting lists instead of price-hikes; exhibits that are intended to be handled, even the fragile ones; no cult of personality for founders; emphasis on both wonder and production; modest and beautifully stocked shop; overall non-commercial emphasis; quirkiness that is commensurate with the actual films), but for now, I'll leave you with this: the beautiful Miyazaki-esque beer-labels from the hot-dog and ice-cream stand.

Miyazaki beer label, Ghibli Museum, Tokyo, Japan

Wearable computing breakthrough

An image from the future past.

(via via @stevenf)

Olaf as Disney princesses


Olaf, the living snowman from Frozen, is pretty much the greatest comic-relief sidekick in animated history. Tortallmagic has made him even better by imagining him as an ambulatory misshapen snowman cosplaying Disney princesses. They're the roles he was born to play.

Olaf as some of the Disney Princesses!!!!!! (via Neatorama)