53 years of nuclear tests as electronic music

I've seen this video described as a musical depiction of all the nuclear bombs ever detonated. But that sort of makes it sound like you're about to get a particularly bombastic version of the 1812 Overture. Instead, "1945-1998" by Isao Hashimoto is more like an infographic with sound effects — or, possibly, a mash-up of the games Simon and Global Thermonuclear War.

What you get is an interesting depiction of nuclear tests through time — 2053 of them (including the non-test explosions at Hiroshima and Nagasaki). I found it particularly interesting to watch the slow ramp up over the course of the late 1940s and early 1950s, when months or years would tick by between tests. After that, beginning in the late 1950s, you see these patterns of sudden flurries of explosions, usually happening in the US and the USSR almost simultaneously. The cultural sense of panic is almost palpable.

Infographic: how money corrupts Congress, and what to do about it


Money wins Elections is an excellent, scrolling infographic that illustrates how money corrupts the American legislative process, showing that time and again, Congress has voted the way that the big money told it to, against the prevailing popular opinion. It's all in support of the American Anti-corruption Act, and it was created by Tony Chu for part of his MFA thesis project.

Money wins Elections

Wealth disparity in America: an inch of bar-graph for the 90%, 4.9 miles' worth for the top 0.01%


Here's a rather graphic representation of the growth in income inequality in the USA since the 1960s; plotted on a chart where the income growth of the bottom 90 percent is represented by an inch-high bar; the growth of the top 10 percent needs a 163 foot-tall bar; while the top 0.01% need a 4.9 mile-high bar to represent their real wealth growth in the same period.

The income growth and shrinkage figures come from analysis of the latest IRS data by economists Emmanuel Saez and Thomas Piketty, who have won acclaim for their studies of worldwide income patterns over the last century.

In 2011 entry into the top 10 percent, where all the gains took place, required an adjusted gross income of at least $110,651. The top 1 percent started at $366,623.

The top 1 percent enjoyed 81 percent of all the increased income since 2009. Just over half of the gains went to the top one-tenth of 1 percent, and 39 percent of the gains went to the top 1 percent of the top 1 percent.

Ponder that last fact for a moment -- the top 1 percent of the top 1 percent, those making at least $7.97 million in 2011, enjoyed 39 percent of all the income gains in America. In a nation of 158.4 million households, just 15,837 of them received 39 cents out of every dollar of increased income.

Income Inequality: 1 Inch to 5 Miles (Thanks, Spider!)

Venn Diagram of Irrational Nonsense: chart of woo


Sometimes, when confronted with woo, it is hard to know exactly what sort of woo you're dealing with. To simplify this challenge while sparing you the agony of enduring any more explanations of ear-candling or aromatherapy than is strictly necessary, Crispian Jago has compiled a handy Venn Diagram of Irrational Nonsense.

The curiously revered world of irrational nonsense has seeped into almost every aspect of modern society and is both complex and multifarious. Therefore rather than attempt a comprehensive taxonomy, I have opted instead for a gross oversimplification and a rather pretty Venn Diagram.

In my gross over simplification the vast majority of the multitude of evidenced-free beliefs at large in the world can be crudely classified into four basic sets or bollocks. Namely, Religion, Quackery, Pseudoscience and the Paranormal.

However as such nonsensical beliefs continue to evolve they become more and more fanciful and eventually creep across the bollock borders. Although all the items depicted on the diagram are completely bereft of any form of scientific credibility, those that successfully intersect the sets achieve new heights of implausibility and ridiculousness. And there is one belief so completely ludicrous it successfully flirts with all forms of bollocks.

Religious Bollocks ∩ Quackery Bollocks ∩ Pseudoscientific Bollocks ∩ Paranormal Bollocks = Scientology

The Venn Diagram of Irrational Nonsense (Thanks, Fipi Lele!)

Dial-up handshaking illustrated


Oona Räisänen has written a thorough and engrossing article about the noises emitted by dial-up modems while they connect and handshake, and the accompanying graphic (ZOMG HUGE) is nothing short of spectacular. It would make a great full-size poster -- maybe a framed art-print.

Now the modems must address the problem of echo suppression. When humans talk, only one of them is usually talking while the other one listens. The telephone network exploits this fact and temporarily silences the return channel to suppress any confusing echoes of the talker's own voice.

Modems don't like this at all, as they can very well talk at the same time (it's called full-duplex). The answering modem now puts on a special answer tone that will disable any echo suppression circuits on the line. The tone also has periodic "snaps" (180° phase transitions) that aim to disable yet another type of circuit called echo canceller.

Now the modems will list their supported modulation modes and try to find one that both know. They also probe the line with test tones to see how it responds to tones of different frequencies, and how much it attenuates the signal. They exchange their test results and decide a speed that is suitable for the line.

After this, the modems will go to scrambled data. They put their data through a special scrambling formula before transmission to make its power distribution more even and to make sure there are no patterns that are suboptimal for transfer. They listen to each other sending a series of binary 1's and adjust their equalizers to optimally shape the incoming signal.

The sound of the dialup, pictured (via JWZ)

Donald Trump: #FEUDWHORE, the chart

Hilary "Chartgirl" Sargent has produced another amazing chart, chronicling the many feuds of the suspected orangutan and noted troll: "Donald Trump: FEUDWHORE."

NYC's new parking signs are great information design


The NYC Department of Transport has revamped its notoriously complex parking-rules signs, so that they're slightly less cryptic. It's a very nice example of good information design!

NYC DOT Commissioner Sadik-Khan, City Council Speaker Quinn and Council Member Garodnick Unveil Newly Designed, Simplified Parking Signs in Midtown (Thanks, Fipi Lele!)

Cards Against Humanity: data on pay-what-you-want holiday pack -- plus $70K donation to Wikimedia


Andrew, sez, "Cards Against Humanity (the Kickstarter-funded, adult version of Apples to Apples) made a 'pay what you want' holiday expansion. They published the results of the experiment."

Camille adds, "The results are detailed and interesting...they list out their costs and revenues, with a map showing average price paid by state, and a fun exploration of what they could buy with the profit they made ($70K). And the best part is...they didn't buy any of that stuff, and instead made a generous donation to Wikimedia!"

Cards Against Humanity: Pay-What-You-Want Holiday pack (Thanks, Andrew and Camille!)

Sitegeist: mobile app mines public data to tell you about the spot you're standing in


Nicko sez, "Sitegeist is a free Android and iPhone app from the Sunlight Foundation that helps you to learn more about your surroundings in seconds. Sitegeist takes public data about the people, housing, history, environment and things to do for any U.S. location and presents it in easy-to-view infographics. Just scroll and swipe your way through the categories to get a feel for the area. Everything from age distributions to political contributions and median home values to record temperatures. It makes complex localized data easy to understand so you can get back to enjoying the neighborhood. The app incorporates publicly available data from a number of sources including the U.S. Census Bureau, InfluenceExplorer.com, the Dark Sky weather API and even Yelp and Foursquare. Sunlight will continue to add and improve on the app as more rich data becomes public."

(Thanks, Nicko!)

Hand-drawn maps of New York


Illustrator Jenni Sparks has released a very beautiful hand-drawn map of NYC:

Hi everyone, so here is the Hand Drawn Map of New York that I've been working on for what seems like FOREVER! It was once again commissioned by the lovely Evermade.com and was just as hard as the Map of London, if not harder... Anyway, I'll let the images speak for themselves as I have lost the ability to think about anything other than buildings. I hope you like it, New York is a super cool city, and if you wanna buy one you can pick one up HERE.

The image above is just a section -- go see the whole thing:

Hand Drawn Map of New York (via Kottke)

Revived Hall of Technical Documentation Weirdness


Darren Barefoot sez, '1000 Internet years ago, I started something called 'The Hall of Technical Documentation Weirdness'. It compiled 'wacky, bizarre, surreal and otherwise strange examples of technical documentation' Boing Boing covered it in 2004, which was a thrill, and some of the images appeared in the IT Crowd. I think of the Hall as the first thing I ever made that the Internet liked. Most of the examples were submitted to me by others. Thanks to dodgy gallery software, the Hall went offline in 2008. I've been meaning to get it back up, and Pinterest seemed like the ideal place for it. I'm in the process of uploading images there, and am happy to accept new submissions via darren at darrenbarefoot dot com."

Hall of Technical Documentation Weirdness (Thanks, Darren!)

XKCD's massive map of Congress's political leanings since the start

Just in time for election season, XKCD's Randall Monroe has busted out another of his amazing, wall-sized infographics, this one depicting the swings to the left, right and center of the senate and the house, through all of US electoral history.

Congress

Letterpressed, inappropriate infographic greeting cards

Safwat sez, "Greetings from Nowhere is a series of inappropriate (but totally awesome) letterpressed greeting cards made up of venn diagrams, pie charts and bar graphs. These cards were designed with the sole objective of not sucking as much as most other holiday cards out there. I am currently trying to fund this project via Kickstarter so that the cards can be letterpressed at a small printshop here in Phoenix, AZ and delivered to project backers in time for the holidays."

Greetings from Nowhere: Letterpressed Holiday Cards (Thanks, Safwat!)

How crooks turn even crappy hacked PCs into money


Brian Krebs revisits his must-see chart on the ways that hacked PCs can be valuable to criminals, which is meant to help explain the importance of security to people who think that their old PCs aren't worth enough for crooks to bother with. As Krebs points out, even low-powered antiques can be used to get up to all sorts of mischief that can compromise your privacy, finance and data, as well as the integrity of the Internet itself.

One of the ideas I tried to get across with this image is that nearly every aspect of a hacked computer and a user’s online life can be and has been commoditized. If it has value and can be resold, you can be sure there is a service or product offered in the cybercriminal underground to monetize it. I haven’t yet found an exception to this rule.

The Scrap Value of a Hacked PC, Revisited

Jonathan Hickman: graphic novel stories, with infographics


I was intrigued by a recent Warren Ellis post about comics creator Jonathan Hickman. Ellis described Hickman's background in graphic design prior to his comics work, and mentioned that he'd done "the lion’s share of the most striking recent use of infographics in comics." The examples given by Ellis were intriguing.

I was in Toronto, and looking for an excuse to patronize the new location of the Silver Snail, Toronto's venerable comics institution, which has just moved from its historic digs on Queen Street West to a new spot on Yonge Street, after the owner sold the building and then retired, selling the business to store manager George Zotti. I've known George since he was a clerk at the Snail and I was a kid working at Bakka, the science fiction bookstore, which was once opposite the Snail's Queen Street location, and I wanted to go down and see the new shop and also support his plunge from manager to owner.

George sold me three Hickman collections, all from Image press: The Nightly News (2007), Pax Romana (2009), and Transhuman (2009). Ellis's point about the graphic design -- and especially the excellent use of infographics -- is well made in all three books. I don't think