Smart thermostat makes dumb security mistakes

Andrew Tierney had a close look at Heatmiser's popular wifi-enabled thermostat and found it to be riddled with security vulnerabilities.

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Insecure printer firmware hacked to play Doom

Printer security sucks -- but Michael Jordon's work on hacking the firmware of the standalone Canon Pixma printer is a more playful example of that suckitude than ever seen before.

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Bruce Sterling's "The Epic Struggle of the Internet of Things"

It's a new long-form essay in the tradition of Sterling's must-read, groundbreaking 2005 book Shaping Things, a critical perspective on what it means to have a house full of "smart" stuff that answers to giant corporations and the states that exert leverage over them.

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The coming Compuserve of Things

What happens when individual companies are allowed to own and control the way your "smart" stuff talks to you and other smart stuff? It's walled garden time, all over again.

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Insurance companies create the Internet of Things You Can't Get Away From

When people who don't agree to bug themselves with devices that snitch on their habits and foibles to insurers are charged huge premiums for their "choice," is it really a choice at all?

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Charlie Stross on the stop/go nature of technological change

Charlie Stross's keynote speech to the Yet Another Perl Conference is an inspired riff on the weird, gradual-then-sudden nature of technological change. As Charlie points out, almost everything today -- including the people -- was around 20 years ago, and most of what's around now will be around in 20 years. But there will be some changes that would shock your boots off. Improbably, he manages to tie this all into perl programming, which, apparently, is the future of smart sidewalks. Charlie's thoughtfully provided a transcript of his talk, and there's a video for those who prefer to hear his rather good comic delivery.

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