Boing Boing 

How the entire internet is reacting to SCOTUS gay marriage ruling (and it's beautiful)

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Because #lovewins.

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FDA & FTC mull homeopathy's future


Both the UK and Australian governments have issued reports describing homeopathy as bunk, and now the US Food and Drug Administration and Federal Trade Commission are holding hearings on the regulation of high-priced sugar-pills.

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UK High Court's insane ruling: ripping CDs is illegal again

The Court interpreted the even loonier European Copyright Directive to say that the government couldn't legalise CD ripping without imposing a levy on the public.

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Magna Carta of Space (1966), new laws for the final frontier

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In 1966, only five years after the first human went to space, aviation lawyer William A. Hyman published the Magna Carta of Space, a serious text proposing a new kind of Space Law. From the British Library:

As outer space exploration was unprecedented, it was unclear what issues lawyers might face when legislating for the ‘final frontier’ and what, if any, jurisdiction they had for imposing an intergalactic law code. Furthermore, as so little was known about space, it was largely up to the legislators’ imagination as to what might be legislated for, forcing them to consider unique questions in the history of jurisprudence.

* Do aliens have legal rights?
* Who owns the stars, planets and moons?
* Where does Space begin and a nation’s airspace end?
* What is the role of private industry in Space?
*Who will allocate radio frequencies and set standard time?...

Hyman’s book explicitly attempted to restrict the misuse of Space by belligerent nations, with articles 7 and 19 making provisions to ban ‘nuclear experiments in Outer Space’ and the prosecution of ‘War, in, by, or through space … forever’. As Hyman stated in his introduction, it was his expressed wish to create a Magna Carta of Space that was so ‘powerful’ it would ‘compel the proper use of space --- for peace’.

Magna Carta of Space (Amazon)

See more at "Space: The Final Frontier" (British Library, via @arielwaldman)

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FBI and DoJ investigating whether St. Louis Cardinals hacked networks of rival Houston Astros baseball team

 Players on the St. Louis Cardinals baseball team, high-fiving one another in happier, more innocent times. [Reuters]


Players on the St. Louis Cardinals baseball team, high-fiving one another in happier, more innocent times. [Reuters]

Prosecutors with the FBI and U.S. Justice Department are investigating whether officials for the St. Louis Cardinals hacked into the internal networks of a rival team, The Houston Astros, to steal valuable private data on players.

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Driver turns up music and starts dancing after 2am traffic stop

"A dancing driver has been banned from the roads," report police in England, "after parking his car on a roundabout and claiming he was on his way to Stonehenge."

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Man who channels alien from the future bombards Tumblr GIF artists with takedown notices

Darryl Anka telepathically channels a space alien from the future named Bashar who lives on the planet Essassani; on this basis, he has claimed many copyright infringements in the creations of Tumblr's GIF artists.

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USA Freedom Act: the good, the bad, and what's next


With the sunsetting of Section 215 of the Patriot Act and the passage of the USA Freedom Act, Congress has, for the first time since the 1970s, put limits on the surveillance powers of America's spooks.

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Every 3 years you get to beg the government for the right to treat your property as if you owned it


Section 1201 of the 1998 Digital Millennium Copyright Act bans jailbreaking devices, even for lawful purposes -- meaning that you can't jailbreak your tractor in order to take it to the service-center of your choosing or fix it yourself.

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The PATRIOT Act is uglier than you thought, and what to do about it

The most outstanding and urgent hour of audio you'll hear this week is the On the Media history of the PATRIOT Act (MP3), and the most important website you'll visit this week is Sunset the PATRIOT Act, which lets you do something about it.

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Apple must keep corporate monitor, says judge

Reuters

Apple has failed in a bid to rid itself of a court-appointed monitor, imposed on the tech company after it was accused of conspiring to raise the price of e-books.

Michael Bromwich's $1000-an-hour job is to ensure Cupertino is compliant with the outcome of the price-fixing case—an imposition that Apple claims is excessively burdensome, given that it must cut his checks. But the federal appeals court ruled that the environment must be "appropriately constrained" and that Bromwich can't be disqualified.

Michael Bromwich, a former Justice Department inspector general, began assessing Apple’s antitrust compliance policies six days after he was appointed in October 2013 by U.S. District Judge Denise Cote, who held the company liable

The case was a bitter one, given that the alleged price-fixing represented efforts by publishers and Apple, a newcomer to the market, to compete with Amazon's overwhelming domination of the ebook marketplace. Mat Honan summed it up like so:

But there were no heroes, and plenty of history coming home to roost for those involved.

Apple objects not only to the cost, but the scope of Bromwich's work. Bromwich says it's just playing games because it can't take its medicine.

According to Bromwich, Apple was pulling a shakedown. He’d filed a report on the company with the court, as had been required, and said Apple was furious with the results. The company, he argued, had been refusing to pay him as punishment.

"The monitoring team still lacks a significant amount of the information it needs to fulfill its monitoring obligations," Bromwich wrote in the report. "For these reasons, and others described in this report, the Monitor’s assessment of Apple’s antitrust compliance policies, procedures, and training remains preliminary."

"We're here in large part not because Apple objects to the fact that we wrote the report," Bromwich said. "We're commanded specifically to write that report and subsequent reports by the final judgment. They're objecting to our discretionary decisions about what to put in the report. There can be nothing more chilling to someone in my position to have the contents of a report challenged and for payment to be declined because the monitored entity isn't happy with what's in the report."

Hacktivist sees too much, FBI lock him up on child-porn charges, produce no evidence


Matthew DeHart, a veteran from a multi-generational military/intelligence family, ran a Tor hidden service server for his Wow guildies, members of his old army unit, and whistleblowers.

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danah boyd explains student privacy bills

"The conversation is constructed as being about student privacy, but it’s really about who has the right to monitor which youth".

Brianna Wu uploads Gamergate death threat to shame Ohio prosecutor

The game developer and Gamergate bogeywoman/survivor has furnished the authorities with the graphic death-threats she received for speaking out about online harassment of women, but they won't take action.

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Atlanta pays $20,000 to critic forced to post pro-cop message to Facebook

Atlanta police Lt. Jeffrey Cantin told Baton Bob, a street performer, that he wouldn't be released on Bond unless he posted complementary remarks about the Atlanta police department to his Facebook page.

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Don't come to your court-date in a lime-green Batman costume

Honestly, it should go without saying.

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