EFF guide to cell phone use for US protesters

It's a timely update to their 2011 edition, incorporating new Supreme Court precedents that give additional protection to protesters who face arrest while video-recording or otherwise documenting protests -- required reading in a world of #Ferguson.

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Brooklyn Law Clinic students scare away patent trolls

The school's clinic is run like a law office and offers free counsel based both on need and on the interestingness of the cases for law students.

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EU wants Google to extend "right to be forgotten" to global users


Right now, Google blocks "forgotten" articles on EU versions of its site.

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Comcast retention rep's network boasts expose company to liability

When the Comcast Rep From Hell insisted that Comcast had the "fastest network in the USA," he was speaking on behalf of the company -- and it was a lie.

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Fewer than 10% of UK families opt into "parental" filters

But they're going to be on-by-default, opt-out-only in the near future anyway, because the Great Firewall of Cameron is based on lazy populism, not evidence.

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Ocala, FL criminalizes sagging pants

If you're on city property and your pants hang more than 2" below your "natural waistline," you face a $500 fine, and for repeat offenders, jail.

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Yet another Ikea fan-site threatened by the company


It's not just Ikeahackers: Ikea has gone all-out war on its web-fans.

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Senate passes phone unlocking bill


The Senate has approved a bill (which already passed in the House) that makes it legal for you to unlock the phones you own so you can choose which carrier you use.

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New Mexico threatens inmate with 90 days' solitary because his family made him a Facebook page

The New Mexico Corrections Department has a policy prohibiting inmates from "accessing the Internet through third parties," which they've interpreted to mean that prisoners whose families maintain Facebook pages for them can be punished with solitary confinement.

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Scalia may have opened path for Quakers to abstain from taxes


The controversial Hobby Lobby decision elevated religious belief over legal compliance -- this may be good news for Quakers, Amish, Mennonites and others who've historically faced punishing reprisals for withholding some of their tax to avoid funding the military.

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Hearings into mass surveillance begin in UK

The secretive UK investigatory powers tribunal has begun its hearings into the legality of mass surveillance conducted by tapping fiber optic lines, through a Snowden-revealed programme called TEMPORA.

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Drone protesting grandmother gets a year in prison in Syracuse


Mary Anne Grady Flores, a grandmother from New York State, was sentenced to a year in prison for nonviolently recording a likewise nonviolent protest over the training of drone pilots at Hancock Air Base near Syracuse.

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Secret proposed UK snooping law published - DO SOMETHING ABOUT IT

The secret, emergency snooping law that the UK Tories plan on ramming through Parliament this week without debate has been published. It's bad, and the leadership of Labour and the Libdems are complicit in the plan to make it law.

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Silicon Valley wage fixing: Disney, Lucas, Dreamworks and Pixar implicated


It's not just tech companies that participated in the massive, illegal "no-poaching" cartel.

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UK government set to ram through surveillance legislation


The UK government is has put MPs on notice that a bill will be considered and moved on July 14, but they won't say what it is. Veteran Labour MP Tom Watson thinks it's data retention legislation that will enlist the private sector to comprehensively spy on everything you do and save it for long periods, turning it over to the government when asked. And almost no one -- not even MPs -- will get a chance to read the bill right up to the last minute, when they'll be whipped to vote for it by their party leadership.