The best pixel art logos from the Commodore Amiga scene


Christian Kirchesch put together a cracking set of logos as used by musicians, pirates, demo writers and other e'erdowells of the Commodore Amiga's hardcore coding scene.

Originally this was supposed to be an article about the Top 20 Logos from Commodore Amiga. It ended up with 159. The more I digged into it, the more precious gems I fount. Graphics I hadn't seen for decades, straying around in .ADF- and .DMS-images somewhere on the Internet, forgotten by most people. Some of these Logos go even back to 1988 (Tristar, Unit A, World of Wonders).

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How Google's latest redesign shrank its logo from 2,145 bytes to only 305

Bit conservation! The redesign makes more sense now. Read the rest

Google's new logo


IMO Paul Rand's best work in 20 years. I would have gone for something traditional, myself, like Zapfino, but I guess they're going for that classy slick design look.

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The design story of NASA's "worm" logo, sadly retired


Over at Display, Graphic designer Richard Danne tells the story of the fantastic "worm" logo he and partner Bruce Blackburn created for NASA in 1974. It was used for almost twenty years until the NASA administrator Dan Goldin unfortunately reinstated the previous "meatball" logo, developed in 1959. Read the rest

Why we can't remember ubiquitous logos, even Apple's


UCLA psychology professor Alan Castel ran an experiment where more than 100 students drew the Apple logo from memory, and the results were surprisingly terrible. Why? Read the rest

Classic game logos tumblr offers a surprisingly focused collection, as useful to artists as it is nostalgic to browse through. It could use filtering tools: say, if one wanted to show just those from Pysgnosis or Nintendo. Read the rest

Star Wars logo history

Over at Tenth Letter of the Alphabet, a fascinating history of the Star Wars logo. Above left, a decal created during the film's pre-production, to be used on film cans and other early materials. "This was how we first pictured Han Solo," production designer and artist Ralph McQuarrie explained in The Star Wars Scrapbook: The Essential Collection. "It could be a sort of Luke character, but I think it’s more like Han. Anyway, George decided that Han Solo should be a more relaxed character, and his costume was changed. But this decal was designed before the change.” Above right, the early corporate letterhead after "The" was dropped. The lettering, based on the Precis font, was by concept artist and SFX tech Joe Johnston. "Anatomy of a Logo: Star Wars" Read the rest