App reveals face of man who has teenager’s missing smartphone


Heidi Whitehead of Denver is asking for help in identifying the gentleman in this photo. He is in possession of a cell phone that Whitehead's son lost. The phone has an Android app called CM Locker that takes a photo when an incorrect password is entered on a phone, and emails the photo to the phone's owner.

From KDVR:

Whitehead posted the photos on Facebook. Her post has been shared more than 100 times. She is asking the community to help her identify the man to get her son’s phone back, no questions asked.

“My initial hope was that somebody would just recognize him and say oh hey I know that guy, he lives down the street or I work with him or whatever,” Whitehead said.

Whitehead said they have called the phone several times but no one answers. If you recognize the man in the photos, email ​

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The Scary Consequences of A Lost Smartphone

If you're one of those people who tend to lose their phone shortly after putting it down, then you'll want to read this. According to a new study, if you lose your smartphone, you have a 50/50 chance of getting it back. But chances are much higher -- nearly 100 percent -- that whoever retrieves it will try to access your private information and apps.

According to a study by Symantec, 96 percent of people who picked up the lost phones tried to access personal or business data on the device. In 45 percent of cases, people tried to access the corporate email client on the device.

"This finding demonstrates the high risks posed by an unmanaged, lost smartphone to sensitive corporate information," according to the report. "It demonstrates the need for proper security policies and device/data management."

Symantec called the study the "Honey Stick Project." In this case the honey on a stick consisted of 50 smartphones that were intentionally left in New York, Los Angeles, Washington, D.C., San Francisco and Ottowa, Canada. The phones were deposited in spots that were easy to see, and where it would be plausible for someone to forget them, including food courts and public restrooms.

None of the phones had security features, like passwords, to block access. Each was loaded with dummy apps and files that contained no real information, but which had names like "Social Networking" and "Corporate Email" that made it easy for the person who found it to understand what each app did. Read the rest