Watch magnets do ballet in slow motion

Taofledermaus writes:

Neodynmium magnets and a high speed camera? It turns out it is, as the kids say, oddly satisfying. I was practicing with some macro shots with the Chronos high speed camera, using LED lighting and filming at around 4000 frames per second. I dropped some hard drive magnets and noticed the magnets behaved very oddly and unpredictably.

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The FEEL FLUX grants the sense of slowing down time

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I’ve been playing with my FEEL FLUX for weeks and its hit rate in the amazement department is 100%.

Each time you drop the metal ball through the copper tube you’d expect it to zip out the other end but instead, it lazily creeps from one end to the other and dribbles out into your waiting hand.

 

SILENT CATCH

A “Silent Catch” is what happens when you toss the ball into the FF and it slowly glides down the sides without making contact with it.  I have to say that it’s satisfying and magical every time I pull off the maneuver.

As the ball glides down the tube, the magnetic field changes inside the metal wall and when this happens, a bit of voltage is created.   This reaction is not unlike a tiny, temporary battery and is called an electromotive force. The movement pattern of the voltage moves down with the ball and looks like this:

 

 

What could be simpler?

The tube’s material is an electrical conductor and drives current around in circles as the ball descends. The scientists at my laboratory tell me that when this happens, a second magnetic field is created that opposes the downward motion of the magnetic ball. The ball wants to fall through the tube at 9.8 meters per second but the field wants to halt it and of course, gravity wins in the end. And here’s the crazy part – the faster the initial downward motion, the more powerful the slowing force becomes. Read the rest

Watch an object levitating atop another levitating object

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YouTuber Latheman666 takes maglev to the next level by adding nine neodymium magnet cubes to a levitating magnet and then floating a pyrolytic graphite disc about 1mm above the neodymium. Hypnotic! Read the rest

Cool magnetic gyroscopic levitation

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Here's cobrakiller2000's homemade Levitron-style magnetic top. He says:

The only non-electric way that I know off to get a magnet fully levitating over a magnet and with nice elevation too. Looks way cool and is just overall a beautiful invention in my opinion. Was hard to pull this off. I struggled for weeks before I got it levitating - very delicate system. Yes, gyroscopic forces keep it from tipping over and therefore keeps it in repelling mode as long the rpm are high enough.
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Exploding soda cans with electromagnets in slow motion

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Joe Hanson from It’s Okay to be Smart and Dianna Cowern from Physics Girl met up with Joe DiPrima of Arc Attack to sear aluminum cans apart with a powerful electromagnet.

Watch a soda can rip itself apart in a fiery explosion at 11,000fps with a Phantom high speed camera. Running a current through a coil, produces an electromagnet. Turn up the voltage in this experiment, and make that current strong enough, and your electromagnet can rip a soda can in half. Or rather, make the can rip itself in half!

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Watch this terrific Rube Goldberg magnet-and-marble tabletop demo

Kaplamino made this delightful Rube Goldberg-esque demo using magnets and steel balls.

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How to separate and stack frighteningly strong neodymium magnets

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Brainiac75 made a pair of wooden tools that he uses to separate and stack large neodymium magnet discs. I've pinched my fingers quite a few times with tiny neodymium magnet discs and have learned to respect them. These big ones are very dangerous. You could easily lose a finger if these magnets were to smack into one another. Please get some thick gloves, Brainiac75! Read the rest

Fun chain-reaction of magnets self-assembling

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Apple teaches a lesson to neodymium bullies

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"The aim of the wise is not to secure pleasure, but to avoid pain." – Aristotle Read the rest

Man smashes $10,000 Apple Watch with magnets

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TechRax destroys gadgets. In this video, he destroys an Apple Watch—a $10,000 model, apparently!—with two gigantic magnets. [via The Next Web] Read the rest

WATCH: Magnetic silly putty eats a magnet

I missed this video when Scott Lawson released it in 2013. It's a 50 second timelapse taken over 1.5 hour period, showing some magnetic silly putty surrounding itself around a neodymium magnet. Read the rest

Xenomorph live-cycle magnets

Jason writes, "Adorn your fridge or cryo-chamber with four magnets depicting the Xenomorph life-cycle! ($30, 25 sets available) Alien Egg, Facehugger, Chestburster and fully grown Xenomorph." Read the rest

A giant electromagnet's cross-country road trip

A 50-foot wide, doughnut-shaped electromagnet recently completed a journey from New York to Illinois. It went most of the way by barge — down the Eastern seaboard and then up the Mississippi River before hitting the road for the last 26 miles, shutting down multiple lanes as it crept along over the course of three nights. Livescience has pictures from this incredible journey. Read the rest

HOWTO make a magnetic detachable stapler for center-stapled booklets and the like

On Instructables, DIYHacksAndHowTos has a great method for separating a cheap stapler and sticking magnets on both halves, enabling you to center-staple booklets and the like. Every year or two, I do something zine-like that requires this sort of thing, and I always end up wasting money on a long-reach stapler that's always lost by the time the next project rolls around. (Don't get me wrong, long-reach staplers are awesome, but if you only need to do booklets once every year or two, they're a lot of investment). This is what I'll do next time (and as a bonus, it'll be great for kid craft projects where we want to use a staple in th center of a large sheet of paper).

One limitation of a typical office stapler is that it only lets you staple about 3 1/2" into the paper. This isn't enough for a lot of projects. If you want to put together your own comic book or a large banner, you are usually stuck stapling your project onto a piece of cardboard or carpet and then bending the legs of the staple by hand. They do sell extra long staplers or staplers with swivel heads but they still have their limitations.

A better option would be to make a stapler with a detachable base. The base would be positioned under the paper and aligned to the top half of the stapler with magnets. This would allow you to staple any area of a project regardless of location.

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Ball of Whacks magnetic creativity toy/tool

I gave "Ball of Whacks" to my 6-year-old son as a Hanukkah gift and I wish I'd have given it to myself. It reminds me a bit of Rubik's Snake but it's much more free-form and fun as the individual blocks aren't permanently connected but rather held together by 180 rare earth magnets. The blocks fit together in a 30-sided rhombic triacontahedron and can be recombined into animals, stars, and other geometric wonders. The Ball of Whacks comes with a guidebook suggesting lots of neat configurations, creativity exercises, and tips but we haven't bothered with that yet. It's addictive without any instruction. Ball of Whacks is available in red, blue, black, and multi-color which is what I, er, my son, was given. Maybe next we'll go for Von Oech's X-Ball, Y-Ball, or Star Ball magnet toys! Ball of Whacks

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Videos of ferrofluids in art and science

Wired's Adam Mann and Nurie Mohamed have a good roundup of a dozen-plus ferrofluid videos, showing off the remarkable aesthetics created at the intersection of magnets, liquid, and metal filings. Not every one of these videos did it for me, but there are some absolute corkers in the lot.

The black liquid mixture is known as a ferrofluid, and is made up of nano-sized, iron-containing particles suspended in water or an organic solvent. When a magnetic field is applied, the ferrofluid puffs out, creating some alien-looking shapes and formations.

Video: Bizarre Magnetic Ferrofluids Will Blow Your Mind Read the rest

HOWTO make a magnetic "reverse hammer" to remove dents from brass instruments

SuperMagnete documents a clever method for removing dents from brass instruments using powerful magnets. You insert a steel ball (smaller than the dent) in the instrument, and then use a padded magnet on the outside to "rub out" the dents. A more elaborate method uses a "reverse hammer" that works on harder surfaces.

To remove the dents on the hard parts of the instrument, Roberto developed a "reverse hammer". It is made of a non-magnetic rod (e.g. copper) with a movable heavy metal block on it's axis (e.g. the head of a normal hammer), a magnet on one end of the rod and a stopper on the other end (see drawing). When the hammerhead hits the stopper, a part of the resulting energy is transported through the magnet to the steel ball within the instrument, which "hammers" the dent from the inside.

Straightening out brass instruments (via Red Ferret) Read the rest

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