The polyamorous Christian socialist utopia that made silverware for proper Americans

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Lisa Hix of has written a lengthy piece for Collectors Weekly on the Oneida Community of the late 19th century, and how it morphed from a group of men and women who "believed the liquid electricity of Jesus Christ’s spirit flowed through words and touch, and that a chain of sexual intercourse would create a spiritual battery so charged with God’s energy that the community would transcend into immortality, creating heaven on earth," to a company that was famous for its flatware.

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3D printed sundial projects digital time

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Mojoptix designed and built a sundial that displays the time in its shadow. You can download the 3D printer files on Thingiverse, or buy one on Etsy.

Fun fact about this sundial: You will most likely never see it in a supermarket or a department store. The swiss cheese inside the sundial is so intricate, that you can’t realistically use injection molding, or some other mass-production method. 3D printing seems actually to be the only practical way to build this digital sundial ! (is that really true ?? let me know what you think in the comments !)

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Adam Savage announces the White House's upcoming National Week of Making

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In a new Tested.com video, Adam Savage celebrates the upcoming National Week of Making that the White House is hosting again this year. To kick off his week in the sort of unique way that only Adam Savage can, he has been asking his social media followers to tag pictures of their personal workspaces, the happy places where they go to create something from nothing.

In the video above, he shows off a number of these wonderfully diverse shops (see a few below) and talks passionately about the joys of making and how we should all yield to the hands-on imperative.

The National Week of Making kicks off on Friday and includes the second annual National Maker Faire, which will take place on Saturday and Sunday at the UDC-Van Ness campus in the District of Columbia. This is one of Maker Media's full-blown flagship events, joining the long-running Maker Faire Bay Area and World Maker Faire in New York. Unlike those events, the National Maker Faire is free to the public.

You can find out more about the National Week of Making and how to get involved on the event's official website.

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Dental regulators want to stop man from selling teeth made from Sculpey

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Dental regulators in Canada are trying to stop a DIY toothmaker from selling false teeth made of craft store modeling clay. Matthew Ronald Block has been making false teeth in his apartment and selling them for $100. From CBC:

According to documents filed in the case, Block came to the authorities' attention last August after boasting in a Craigslist ad of having "invented a temporary flipper type false tooth" to help his girlfriend overcome a dental abnormality.

"She is able to do everything she would with a normal smile like eat, kiss, sing etc," the ad said.

"The idea that others may be in similar situations and would benefit from my assistance has been in the back of my mind for several months."

The ad, which has since disappeared, offered to sell individually fitted teeth for $100 each.

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Kickstarting beltbuckle multitools

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Tony Zentil, a mechanical engineer, has a fully funded Kickstarter for a variety of multitool belt-buckles aimed at skateboarders, snowboarders, and motorcyclists -- they're a significant advance on my old, beloved 686 belt-buckle stolen by the security staff of London Gatwick airport in 2011. Read the rest

Do Robot Fireflies Dream of Electric Lights?

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Rick Lieder's astounding backyard photography has inducted us into the worlds of bees, birds, and bugs, but his firefly photos (captured in his book Among a Thousand Fireflies, with a poem by Helen Frost) were astounding, even by his own high standards. In this piece, Lieder explains how he captured the intimate lives of the fireflies in his backyard to create a remarkable book.

Swedish traditional costume made from Ikea bags

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After seeing a picture of the Swedish royals in "folk costumes," she used four blue Ikea bags, one yellow one, and a Ikea Dvala bedsheet to replicate the costume -- she did a brilliant job. Read the rest

Making an edible Google Cardboard VR viewer out of graham crackers and icing

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Caleb Kraft used overlapping graham crackers and icing/glue to piece together a functional, edible Google Cardboard viewer whose only inedible components were the lenses (which Kraft says he could have made from edible material -- sugar? -- but lacked the time for). Read the rest

The Steampunk Roadster: Jake von Slatt's final steampunk project, and it's for sale!

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Steampunk pioneer Jake von Slatt sez, "Unbelievably, The Steampunk Workshop will be ten years old in just a few months so it's kind of fitting that I've just completed my biggest and probably my last steampunk mod of my steampunk career. It's a car and it's for sale." Read the rest

Sensors – The final volume in an impressive series of electronics guides for 21st-century makers

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See sample pages from this book at Wink.

Encyclopedia of Electronic Components Volume 3: Sensors by Charles Platt and Fredrik Jansson Maker Media 2016, 256 pages, 7.9 x 9.6 x 0.4 inches (softcover) $18 Buy a copy on Amazon

With this somewhat slim but jam-packed volume, Make: contributing editor and electronics columnist, Charles Platt (here joined by Fredrik Jansson), completes his detailed explorations of the modern, common electronics components most useful to today’s electronics hobbyists and other DIYers.

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Summer Camps for Coding? Think Again.

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If you're a Boing Boing reader with children, the thought of getting them into coding has probably crossed your mind. Summer is a great time to expose kids to new interests, and coding is no exception. But unlike traditional summer camps, coding camps are less familiar territory, and often demand a high price tag with uncertain outcomes.

73 Plans That Will Change the Way You Grow Your Garden

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See sample pages from this book at Wink.

Groundbreaking Food Gardens: 73 Plans That Will Change the Way You Grow Your Garden by Niki Jabbour, illustrations by Anne Smith, Elayne Sears and Mary Ellen Carsley Storey Publishing 2014, 272 pages, 8 x 10 x 0.8 inches (softcover) $15 Buy a copy on Amazon

Fittingly, the layout of Groundbreaking Food Gardens is similar to a community garden. Within the landscape of this one book, readers find 73 distinct plots, each neatly contained, each with its own character in the beds of text and image. In it, edible gardening expert Niki Jabbour curates 73 thematically diverse illustrated plans contributed by master food growers and writers with unendingly fresh perspectives. Each mini-chapter opens with three or four cornerstones of the design therein, and these points become headers for each section, like garden markers for the reader.

Even the most bibliophilic gardener has to admit, it’s hard to find a good gardening book that says or does something new. But within the first 24 hours of bringing home Groundbreaking Food Gardens, I had filled it with every bit of scrap paper in our bookmark pile. Though more of a design lookbook than a how-to, it still offers plenty of information. Woven throughout the plans, there are both practical tips and historical gardening factoids to appeal to new and seasoned gardeners alike. You wouldn’t use a bean pole to support a squash, and so the scaffolding of each design chapter changes slightly to reflect the 73 unique concepts. Read the rest

Snail shell helmets

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Heather Ann, a Dallas costume/prosthetics maker, created these $110 snail shell helmets (tentacles not currently included). Read the rest

Watch a fake head of cabbage and other fake food being made

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Watch this talented guy make realistic food by pouring melted wax in a water bath. He's making the samples seen in Japanese restaurant windows.

Gujo town in Gifu prefecture of Japan is the place where technology of making these ultra-realistic food samples used to show menu in Japanese restaurants began. These samples are made out of plastic, wax and other materials, and then painted. It is also possible to try making some simple samples by yourself.

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How to bake a Pie-Ger: the HR Giger Pie

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"HR Pieger" Recipe by Jessica Leigh Clark-Bojin (aka @ThePieous) Read the rest

The Zen of Making: 13 Rules for Creating an Open Source Community

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I was using Spotlight on OS X to find my Zen Desktop Cleaner app when "The Zen of Making" showed up. I forgot all about it, but I'm glad I came across it again.

Adapted from a talk by Massimo Banzi, co-founder of Arduino, presented at World Maker Faire 2011 in New York.

1. Don’t make something you don’t use yourself.

2. Know who you are making it for.

3. Know what you want out of it.

4. Make projects, not platforms.

5. Respect the intelligence of the beginner.

6. Experts are not the best advisors when you want to make tools for beginners.

7. If nobody complains you're doing something wrong.

8. Including people is hard (but necessary)

9. Good hardware, good software, good explanations, and generous users make a great project

10. If you're not prepared to have someone adapt, improve, clone, or trash your work, don't share it.

11. Open source software doesn't necessarily translate into a business model... open source hardware must.

12. Expect resistance... and conspiracy theories.

13. Don’t let the fact that you don't know what you're doing stop you.

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Mover Kit - a programmable wearable kit for kids

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My friends Bethany and Daniel, founders of Technology Will Save Us, have developed the "world’s first active wearable that kids, young and old, can make and code themselves." It's called the Mover, and it looks like a lot of fun to build, program, and use! Read the rest

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