Men upset by cartoon

This cartoon, published in The New Yorker, is upsetting men today. The cartoonist is Will McPhail, who is good at capturing the moment.

So:

Robert Jeantet So, she's allowed to tell him what she thinks of it, but he's not allowed to tell her what he thinks of it ? What a great way to have a dialogue. To call it "mansplaining" is just as patronizing. Sauce for the goose, sauce for the gander. And inversely.

Angus Moorehead You expect them to wonder in silence rather than discuss the art. Really.

Gary Wheat "I wonder" in conversation is commonly interpreted as an invitation for help in understanding something. If this were a date and I had some insight about the painting to offer and was met with such a passive-aggressive response, I would certainly reconsider a second date

On and on it goes. Prints are available. Read the rest

Man invents vagina glue for menstruating women to hold in menses, frustratedly explains vaginas to them

Daniel Dopps, a chiropractor, has invented a vaginal glue applied with a lipstick-like device. The idea is to glue one's vagina shut during menstruation, thereby obviating the need for sanitary pads or tampons: he claims that the glue will dissolve and menses thereby released during urination, after which one's vag glue can be reapplied. His product has the rather spectacular name "Mensez," lady consumers are not impressed by any of it, and Dopps is therefore having to explain it to them until they understand.

The superficially feminine stock art over masculine sales concepts really pulls it together. CONTROL IS THE SECRET. LEAKAGE. INFECTION. COMFORT. Read the rest

Mansplaining Lolita

Rebecca Solnit's brilliant, scathing critique of Esquire's "The 80 Best Books Every Man Should Read" (a list with 79 male authors in it) earned her a mailbag full of mansplaining letters in which dudes explained to an eminent, brilliant author how to read a book. Read the rest

Gentleman scolds woman for not paying attention to Trump

She is reading a copy of Citizen: An American Lyric by Claudia Rankine.

Jacket copy:

Claudia Rankine's bold new book recounts mounting racial aggressions in ongoing encounters in twenty-first-century daily life and in the media. Some of these encounters are slights, seeming slips of the tongue, and some are intentional offensives in the classroom, at the supermarket, at home, on the tennis court with Serena Williams and the soccer field with Zinedine Zidane, online, on TV-everywhere, all the time. The accumulative stresses come to bear on a person's ability to speak, perform, and stay alive. Our addressability is tied to the state of our belonging, Rankine argues, as are our assumptions and expectations of citizenship. In essay, image, and poetry, Citizen is a powerful testament to the individual and collective effects of racism in our contemporary, often named "post-race" society.

From Vic Berger IV's Vine. Read the rest

Mansplaining: The Statue

Cathy de la Cruz tweeted this snapshot of a statue on the San Antonio, Texas campus of the awesomely-named University of the Incarnate Word.

Hillary

At Feministing, Zerlina collects some useful Hillary Clinton gifs from yesterday's Benghazi hearings: "How to deal with a mansplainer starring Hillary Clinton." Read the rest