Map of businesses with puntastic names

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Atlas Obscura and Digg have generated an incredible interactive map of punnish-named businesses, neatly organized by category.

The pain mixed with pleasure of, say, something as evocative as Hannah and Her Scissors, or something as plainly wrong as A Shoe Grows in Brooklyn surrounds us. After picking through duplicates, over 1,900 businesses made the map, which we think makes it the most complete pun business name map in the world.

There isn't, to my eye, any discernible concentration to set the map apart from population density and the well-known "resort bonus" increasing the numbers of restaurants and bars on coastlines. Which is to say, everyone in America's vast cultural tapestry are yet equal offenders when it comes to puns.

Be sure to filter by editors' choice. For example, "Floral and Hardy," an Oklahoma City florist, and "What Were You Inking?" a tattoo-removal specialist in Denver. Read the rest

The Mercator Puzzle reminds you how deceptive maps can be

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The Earth is round, and maps are flat. While we have may mapped nearly every inch of our world, figuring out how to translate that information from three dimensions to two remains a problem. Read the rest

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Map shows you if leaves are falling without you having to leave house or approach window

autymn has a delightful interactive graphic to show the turn of the season by county. Slide it and see! [via Kottke] Read the rest

London Underground releases official geographic map

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London's subway system switched early to an abstract map (PDF), and it became a legendary work of design. It just published an internally-used geographic version of map (PDF), however, for the first time in a century—and it's awesome. Read the rest

World map with countries the size of their stock markets


Created by Bank of America Merrill Lynch's Chief Investment Strategist Michael Hartnett, this illustration shows "free-float equity market capitalization" in billions of dollars. Read the rest

Watch weather forecaster nail pronunciation of: Llanfairpwll​gwyngyllgogery​chwyrndro​bwllllantysilio​gogogoch


Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch is a village on the island of Anglesey off the coast of Wales, UK. Nice work, Liam Dutton of Channel 4. Read the rest

The Game of Thrones cartographer explains how to draw maps

How to draw a map - a tutorial on creating a map from sketch to finally rendered map
If you've ever wanted to make your own map—either of the real world or a fantasy world of your creation—these tips are essential.
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Wargames-style map shows ongoing internet attacks


The Norse Map is a Wargames-style visualization of ongoing attacks on servers around the world. Though it shows honeypots rather than actual private or government targets, the result is a live snapshot of trends in computer mischief.

Dubai seems to be getting quite a pounding today. Read the rest

Watch the arctic ice cap disappear in these National Geographic maps


"Yes, Mr. President," the headline says. "We Remade Our Atlas to Reflect Shrinking Ice"

In a speech about climate change, Barack Obama had noted that over the years, National Geographic maps of the arctic had changed. The 10th edition of its Atlas of the World, especially, shows a much-diminished ice cap—and even more is gone in the 2014 edition.

As the ocean heats up due to global warming, Arctic sea ice has been locked in a downward spiral. Since the late 1970s, the ice has retreated by 12 percent per decade, worsening after 2007, according to NASA. May 2014 represented the third lowest extent of sea ice during that month in the satellite record, according to the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC).

Ice loss is accelerated in the Arctic because of a phenomenon known as the feedback loop: Thin ice is less reflective than thick ice, allowing more sunlight to be absorbed by the ocean, which in turn weakens the ice and warms the ocean even more, NASA says.

The most recent map shows the north pole barely fifty miles from the edge. [via Flowing Data] Read the rest

World's weirdest border enclave "resolved"


Enclaves appear when history contrives to put a piece of one country completely inside another. India and Bangladesh's border is a maze of them, but they've just fixed the craziest of them all: an enclave surrounded by an enclave surrounded by an enclave surrounded by another state.

Attempts to rectify the situation have stalled for decades: An agreement for a land swap was reached in 1974, but India did not ratify it. In 2011, however, a new agreement was reached, which, after some stalling, was finally ratified in June. The enclaves will become territory of the states that surround them and the citizens who live within them will get to decide whether they want to stay put and accept new citizenship, or whether they want to keep their original citizenship and be relocated.

Read the rest

New guesses at MH370's location, mapped


Debris having washed ashore on Réunion, tracing the tides—and the genetics of encrusted barnacles living on the flaperon—gives us new clues to the final resting place of the lost jet. Read the rest

3D maps of London Underground stations

The axonometric, not-to-scale diagrams are pretty sweet -- like the castings made of underground ant-colonies, cross with the insane arcology furutism of Paolo Soleri. Read the rest

Maps of US electricity sources

The Washington Post's map shows type by color, and output by size; other maps drill down into the data. [via] Read the rest

Map depicts per-city STD rates nationwide


Cities in the south such as Montgomery, Ala., Memphis, Tenn., and Richmond, Va., dominate the higher reaches of the list, but you just can't hold down Philly.

The data used here comes from the CDC for 2013, and reflects reports of syphilis, gonorrhea and chlamydia. (Herpes data is not collected). To normalize the data, we measured rates per 100,000 people. We chose only to show cities with a significant amount of population, so rural counties are not show on this map. The CDC makes available a wide range of statistical, anonymous data about STDs in America.

The map was created and produced by Read the rest

High-resolution, deliberately "inaccurate" maps


Project Linework posts maps in a variety of loosey-goosey styles, for people who want things almost right. Read the rest

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