The beauty and wisdom of mathematics

Scientist and inventor Cliff Pickover introduces his newest book on the beauty of math, The Mathematics Devotional

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Parable of the Polygons: segregation and "slight" racism


Vi Hart and Nicky Case created a brilliant "playable post" that challenges you to arrange two groups of polygons to make them "happy" by ensuring that no more than 2/3 of their neighbors are different.

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Beautiful, easy animations of equations

Max writes, "I made a small 'web-thing' that renders a 100x100 square of colored pixels based on an equation input by the user. You can use it to explore mathematics, or just enjoy the pretty colors. All creations are easily share-able by copying the URL."

WATCH: Origami expert creates "impossible" computer-generated shape

Mathematician and origami expert Tom Hull created this pleated multi-sliced cone from paper, never before accomplished since Robert Lang designed it via computer.

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Pi fleece provides warmth, irrationality


Thinkgeek's Pi Fleece keeps you warm and irrational with the first 413 digits of Pi in machine-washable fleece, measuring 45"x64".

Kickstarting another season of the outstanding Relatively Prime math podcast

Samuel Hansen's fantastic math podcast is everything a technical program should be deep but accessible, thoughtful but funny, and free for all; the new season is on Kickstarter for a few more hours! I put in $35.

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The Math Book: From Pythagoras to the 57th Dimension, 250 Milestones in the History of Mathematics

The astonishingly prolific author/scientist Clifford Pickover (see the review of his Book of Black for a list of some of his other books) is a math enthusiast with a talent for ferreting out fascinating anecdotes about math, and writing them in a way that inspires wonder.

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Deep math of the folded pizza slice


Why does a flat pizza slice flop over unless you bend it into a curve? Thank Gaussian curvature, the 19th century mathematical principle that underpins everything from corrugated cardboard to eggshells to Pringles chips.

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Spheres o' gears


Deviantart's Taffgoch creates beautiful models of spheres made from kinetic elements, primarily gears.

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Citizen Maths: open, free math education for adults


Seb writes, "Citizen Maths is a new CC-BY licensed open online maths course produced in the UK for adults and college students who want to improve their grasp of maths at what in the UK is known as Level 2 (the level that 16 year old school leavers are expected to reach, though many do not)."

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Spirographic pancakes

Pancake pioneer Saipancakes has combined a spirograph with a pancake-batter dispenser -- the Pangraph -- and it makes gorgeous fairy-pancakes with many nested symmetries.

How to cut a bagel into two interlocking rings

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You will need a knife, a non-toxic marker, and some math.

Rational numbers are impossible!

Brilliant, high-speed math vlogger Vi Hart has revisited the topic of the sizes of infinities.

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How to Be a Math Genius - Illustrated examples to show your kid the power, beauty, and joy of math

I enjoyed learning about statistics, probability, zero, infinity, number sequences, and more in this heavily illustrated kids’ book called How to Be a Math Genius, by Mike Goldsmith. But would my 11-year daughter like it as much? I handed it to her after school and she become absorbed in it until called for dinner. She took it to the dinner table and read it while we ate. The next day, she asked for the book so she could finish it. Loaded with fun exercises (like cutting a hole through a sheet of paper so you can walk through it), How to Be a Math Genius will show kids (and adults) that math is often complicated, but doesn’t need to be boring. (This book is part of DK Children’s How to Be a Genius series. See my review of How to Be a Genius.)

See sample interior pages at Wink.

Vi Hart on the relative sizes of infinities

Just in time for you to get the most out of "The Fault in Our Stars," the incomparable, fast-talking mathblogger Vi Hart's latest video is a sparkling-clear explanation of one of my favorite math-ideas: the relative size of different infinities. If that's not enough for you, have a listen to this episode of the Math for Primates podcast.

Proof some infinities are bigger than other infinities