Maze exhibition in D.C.

Over at Smithsonian, a short piece about the National Building Museum's giant maze installation (construction video above) with a brief history of labyrinths.

The first recorded labyrinth comes from Egypt in the 5th century B.C.; the Greek historian, Herodotus, wrote that "all the works and buildings of the Greeks put together would certainly be inferior to this labyrinth as regards labor and expense." One of the most famous labyrinths of antiquity is the Cretan Labyrinth, which housed the terrifying Minotaur at its center. The Roman Empire often employed labyrinthine motifs on their streets or above their doors, almost always accompanied by images of a Minotaur at the center—the labyrinths were thought to represent the protection of fortification.

Vast, hand-drawn maze took seven years to design

@Kya7y's father spent seven years drawing an enormous, intricate maze on a sheet of A1 paper, of which this photo is but a tiny part. Flooby Nooby's Ron Doucet collects the revealed sections; there seems to be no single, high-quality image showing the labyrinth in its entirety. [Matome via Spoon-tamago]

Solving this maze might be a bit of a stretch

By Drimble at B3TA via Pineapplecharm at Reddit.