Pizza Hut introduces hot-dog stuffed crust Pizza in UK

"For the lucky Brits," as Fox News put it, are 14" pizzas with sausage-stuffed crusts. The Pi of this pie makes for 44" of hot dog. Read the rest

TOM THE DANCING BUG: Lucky Ducky, in "Tricklin' Down"!

Visit the TOM THE DANCING BUG WEBSITE, and follow RUBEN BOLLING on TWITTER. Read the rest

We need to talk about red meat ...

Last week, you probably heard about a study purporting to show that consuming any amount of red meat significantly upped your risk of premature death. If that news has you freaked out, I highly recommend reading Deborah Blum's roundup of high-quality news coverage of this study. Her piece explains what the study does say, what it doesn't say, and why some evidence is better than other evidence. The takeaway: You should probably be reducing the amount of processed meat that you eat (but we already knew that). Read the rest

Working Undercover in a Slaughterhouse: an interview with Timothy Pachirat

Timothy Pachirat, Assistant Professor of Politics at The New School for Social Research and the author of Every Twelve Seconds, is not the first to see industrialized violence and political analogues in the slaughterhouse. But rather than write an exposé, he took a job at one to see how it works from the perspective of those who work there. I interviewed him about his experiences on the kill floor. Read the rest

Lab-grown meat gets closer to reality

You see that whitish stuff in the petri dish? That, my dears, is lab-grown meat. Meat made without all the physical, environmental, and ethical mess that goes along with raising actual animals for food.

The little tabs on either end of each piece of meat are Velcro, used to stretch and "exercise" the muscle cells that make up this lab meat. (Some earlier attempts at growing meat in the lab failed because, without exercise, muscle tissue isn't something that's particularly palatable.) It's white because there's no blood running through it. And, to create food, you'd have to combine this single layer of muscle tissue with thousands of other layers of muscle and lab-grown fat.

Dutch biologist Mark Post, the man behind the meat, thinks that he can build the world's first lab-grown burger within a year for a cost of $345,000.

You can read the full story in an article by Reuters' Kate Kelland

Image: Francois Lenoir / Reuters

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Meat Mix

Between the vintage meat industry infomercial doing the rounds again, @GlennF pointing out that there may be bits of hundreds of cows in a single pack of hamburger, and my longstanding love of this YouTube, I thought a quick tribute to all three was in order. [Video Link] The music is titled "Some sort of machine pooping out big blobs of meat." Read the rest

Houston hackspace's open-house month, with BBQ!

Calling all Houstonites! The Tx/Rx Labs hackspace is hosting a series of BBQ-infused open houses through the month of March:
What's a Hack-B-Q? Think free B-B-Q with the added bonus of getting to share knowledge with TXRX Members who have expertise in exciting DIY technology projects. And that's just for starters: There are tons of exciting projects in progress and members with expertise in chemistry, electrical engineering, biology, physics, programming, mechanical engineering, and many others, all of whom are interested in sharing that knowledge for the benefit of the community. Oh yeah, and did we mention FREE TI LaunchPad Dev Kits? (while supplies last)
Tx/Rx Labs (Thanks, Rtavk!) Read the rest

David Cronenberg's iPhone charger

By Mio I-zawa, via Laughing Squid and Pink Tentacle. Read the rest

Ribs in a can (and other delights)

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Butcher's cuts anatomical tee

Penfold sez, "A useful t-shirt depicting the cuts of meat one might use to butcher a human. Ever wondered where your tenderloin is? This shirt is a great ice-breaker when meeting cannibals. It would also be handy for coping with a desert island/mountainous plane crash survival (Your friends' survival, obviously, not yours. Now that's altruism) situation."

My physiotherapist has a funny habit of pointing to bits of my back and going, "Right, I'd like you to think about flexing this part right here under your left sirloin." Funnily enough, this turns out to be a pretty good way to align my conscious will with my prioperception.

(Love this. Penfold, can you drop me an email please? I'd love to talk further with you about the possibilities for the design, but you didn't put your email in the submission.)

They're made out of meat! Previously:Business cards made from meat Terry Bisson's "They're Made Out of Meat" video Read the rest

Unicorn Meat

This canned meat product from ThinkGeek costs $10 and is an 'excellent source of sparkles.' Read the rest

HOWTO use a touch-screen without shucking your gloves (use a sausage)

According to this Korean news site, shilly Koreans have figured out how to use their iPhones and other electrostatic touchscreen devices without removing their gloves: instead, they use miniature sausages, which are close enough to a human finger in composition to trick the screen into responding.

IPhone frenzy in the mini-sausages 'maekseubong' a special (via Kottke) Previously:Soviet-era Estonian meat commercial - Boing Boing Scientists invent "meat spaghetti" to trick kids - Boing Boing Victoria Reynolds's meat paintings - Boing Boing Famous Chinese meat-product buns called "Dog would ignore it ... Read the rest

Meet your meat

A new slideshow on Treehugger takes you inside a hipster/foodie hog butchery workshop, via photos of dead pig parts that are not nearly as front-page friendly as the one posted above. The goal: Understanding where the meat you buy comes from and what the process of turning animal into meat looks like—at least, in the traditional one-guy-with-a-knife sense. It's an interesting bit of DIY food production + often-ignored reality, and I'm reminded of some favorite scenes from Little House in the Big Woods (head cheese! bladder balloon!).

The story also contains a link to a fascinating side article on 5 Things To Do With Leftover Bacon Fat—which involves both bourbon, and cookies. How could it be wrong?

Treehugger: Graphic Images from Hog Butchery Workshop in New York

Image courtesy Flickr user rumpleteaser, via CC

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