Mysterious ape-like creature caught on camera in Los Angeles

Jake Gardiner was walking in the woods in the foothills of La Crescenta, a suburb of Los Angeles, when he heard rustling in the trees. He recorded video on his mobile phone and later noticed what many are saying looks like an ape-like creature swinging around the branches.

“It could be some kind of ape, it also could be a bear, it could be a large bird,” says Andrew Hughan, a spokesman with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife.

He added that it could be someone's pet but it's difficult to say based on the blurry video and lack of physical evidence.

“It’s an interesting mystery right at the moment, and we'll see what happens," he says.

(Los Angeles Times)

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Monkeys helped man who mysteriously vanished in the Bolivian Amazon

Tourist Maykool Coroseo Acuña, 25, was lost in the Bolivian Amazon for nine days. He says that he was only able to survive thanks to "a group of monkeys, who dropped him fruit and lead him to shelter and water every day." And that isn't even the strangest part of the story surrounding Acuña. From Elizabeth Unger's fascinating article in National Geographic:

(Tour organizer Feizar Nava) had invited the tourists at the lodge to participate in a Pachamama ceremony—a tradition involving coca leaves, candles, and cigarettes—to thank Pachamama, or Mother Earth, for giving them permission to enter the forest.

When Maykool was asked to join the ceremony alongside the group, he had refused, Feizar said. And when a guide had returned to his cabin to check on him, he was nowhere to be found. The amount of time that had passed between when Maykool was last seen and when someone went back for him was only five minutes.

Panicked, Feizar and his guides checked every inch of the lodge. Maykool wasn’t there. The group headed out into the rainforest with flashlights. They searched until five in the morning, to no avail. Maykool seemed to have completely vanished.

“It’s because he offended the Pachamama.” Feizar said. “He didn’t want to participate in the ceremony.”

"Lost Tourist Says Monkeys Saved Him in the Amazon" (Nat Geo) Read the rest

Monkey tries to teach human how to open a nut

Dangit human. put some muscle in it

This little monkey is trying her hardest to train a limp-limbed human how to crack open a nut with a rock. When she realizes the human isn't making much of an effort, she looks up with an expression that says, "Wtf‽ Help me out here, hairless ape covered in fibers!"

Similarly: Monkey teaches human how to crush leaves Read the rest

Monkeys floss with stolen human hair

To these monkeys, people are just machines that make dental floss. Read the rest

Mother and child viewing images on tablet

[via]

Mother and child viewing images on a tablet
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"Monkey Selfie" case headed to U.S. Court of Appeals

In 2011 a crested macaque in Indonesia took a selfie using photographer David J. Slater's camera. After Slater claimed copyright of the photo, PETA sued on behalf of the monkey, claiming it was the copyright holder. But in January a federal judge tossed out the lawsuit, ruling that non-human animals are not allowed to own a copyright.

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Watch a monkey's revenge on guy who gave it the finger

The monkeys of Shimla, India are not to be trifled with by other primates.

(via r/funny)

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It's a monkey in a snowsuit, checking on his pet chickens and goat

In this heartwarming example of interspecies friendship, a monkey named Fedor makes haste to visit his pet chickens and goat.

[via] Read the rest

Drunk, knife-wielding monkey pursues bar patrons

A drunk monkey turned "belligerent" at a bar in Brazil, reports Arede, grabbing a knife, pursuing patrons and climbing onto the roof.

After the tiny primate—said to live at the bar—downed a glass of rum and armed itself, firefighters had to be called to subdue it. The monkey was later released to the wild, according to the report, but was spotted menacing homeowners on the outskirts of town. After recapture, local authorities now plan to move the monkey to the Brazilian Institute of Environment and Renewable Natural Resources for evaluation. Read the rest

Monkey gets down to business, or something

When an alternate explanation for what is being depicted in his Year of the Monkey poster was offered to illustrator Lehu Zhang, he said:

that he can now see “some sexual things” in the work, but swears he didn’t intend that. “I’m not angry,” he told BuzzFeed News. “I’m just a little bit surprised, a little bit worried.”

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Watch this adorable orangutan's response to a simple yet effective magic trick

Oh, my heart! An amazing human/primate interaction, caught on video.

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Generous criminal monkey distributes stolen cash

In the northern Indian city of Shimla, a monkey burgled 10,000 rupees from a home, climbed a tree, and threw the bills down one-by-one on passers-by. This isn't the first such incident either. Read the rest

Monkey-masked men hired by Indian officials

New Delhi government officials have hired 40 young men to wear monkey masks and jump around outside the parliament buildings in an attempt to scare off macaques wreaking havoc on the grounds. From the AFP:

The NDMC, the body tasked with providing civic services, said the men were “very talented” and had been trained to “closely copy” the noises and actions of the more aggressive langurs to scare away the smaller rhesus macaques.

“They often wear a mask on their faces, hide behind the trees and make these noises to scare away the simians,” NDMC chairman Jalaj Srivastava told AFP.

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China trains monkey soldiers

China's air force has trained macaques to fight off birds nesting at an air base. The risk is that birds could interfere with the planes' engines. According to a CNN translation of a post on the People's Liberation Army Air Force site, "The monkeys are loyal bodyguards who defend the safety of our comrades." Read the rest

Lindsey Carr's aristocratic monkey paintings

Opening tonight at Seattle's Roq La Rue Gallery, Lindsey Carr's "La Petite Singerie," a wonderful collection of aristocratic primate portraits. Also hanging, Marco Mazzoni's "Naturama" sketchbook pages and pen drawings of animals. View the artwork online! Read the rest

Bikini model photographed by a chimpanzee in a kimono, 1963

(@History_Pics via John Curley) Read the rest

Women, sex, and monkeys: what primatology can teach us about female desire

"With primatology, science has refused to see that females are the aggressors, the rulers, the initiators of sex. For so long, almost to a humorous extent, we have looked right past the truth; which is that the females are leaving their young, they're objectifying their mates, they're the agents of desire. The psychologist had to keep getting rid of his male monkeys because the females got bored with them!" A snip from Zoe Williams's Guardian piece on Daniel Bergner, author of What Do Women Want?, a new book about female sexual desire. Read the rest

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