Monkey tries to teach human how to open a nut

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Dangit human. put some muscle in it

This little monkey is trying her hardest to train a limp-limbed human how to crack open a nut with a rock. When she realizes the human isn't making much of an effort, she looks up with an expression that says, "Wtf‽ Help me out here, hairless ape covered in fibers!"

Similarly: Monkey teaches human how to crush leaves Read the rest

Monkeys floss with stolen human hair

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To these monkeys, people are just machines that make dental floss. Read the rest

Mother and child viewing images on tablet

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[via]

Mother and child viewing images on a tablet
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"Monkey Selfie" case headed to U.S. Court of Appeals

Self portrait by monkey

In 2011 a crested macaque in Indonesia took a selfie using photographer David J. Slater's camera. After Slater claimed copyright of the photo, PETA sued on behalf of the monkey, claiming it was the copyright holder. But in January a federal judge tossed out the lawsuit, ruling that non-human animals are not allowed to own a copyright.

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Watch a monkey's revenge on guy who gave it the finger

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The monkeys of Shimla, India are not to be trifled with by other primates.

(via r/funny)

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It's a monkey in a snowsuit, checking on his pet chickens and goat

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In this heartwarming example of interspecies friendship, a monkey named Fedor makes haste to visit his pet chickens and goat.

[via] Read the rest

Drunk, knife-wielding monkey pursues bar patrons

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A drunk monkey turned "belligerent" at a bar in Brazil, reports Arede, grabbing a knife, pursuing patrons and climbing onto the roof.

After the tiny primate—said to live at the bar—downed a glass of rum and armed itself, firefighters had to be called to subdue it. The monkey was later released to the wild, according to the report, but was spotted menacing homeowners on the outskirts of town. After recapture, local authorities now plan to move the monkey to the Brazilian Institute of Environment and Renewable Natural Resources for evaluation. Read the rest

Monkey gets down to business, or something

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When an alternate explanation for what is being depicted in his Year of the Monkey poster was offered to illustrator Lehu Zhang, he said:

that he can now see “some sexual things” in the work, but swears he didn’t intend that. “I’m not angry,” he told BuzzFeed News. “I’m just a little bit surprised, a little bit worried.”

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Watch this adorable orangutan's response to a simple yet effective magic trick

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Oh, my heart! An amazing human/primate interaction, caught on video.

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Generous criminal monkey distributes stolen cash

In the northern Indian city of Shimla, a monkey burgled 10,000 rupees from a home, climbed a tree, and threw the bills down one-by-one on passers-by. This isn't the first such incident either. Read the rest

Monkey-masked men hired by Indian officials

New Delhi government officials have hired 40 young men to wear monkey masks and jump around outside the parliament buildings in an attempt to scare off macaques wreaking havoc on the grounds. From the AFP:

The NDMC, the body tasked with providing civic services, said the men were “very talented” and had been trained to “closely copy” the noises and actions of the more aggressive langurs to scare away the smaller rhesus macaques.

“They often wear a mask on their faces, hide behind the trees and make these noises to scare away the simians,” NDMC chairman Jalaj Srivastava told AFP.

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China trains monkey soldiers

China's air force has trained macaques to fight off birds nesting at an air base. The risk is that birds could interfere with the planes' engines. According to a CNN translation of a post on the People's Liberation Army Air Force site, "The monkeys are loyal bodyguards who defend the safety of our comrades." Read the rest

Lindsey Carr's aristocratic monkey paintings

Opening tonight at Seattle's Roq La Rue Gallery, Lindsey Carr's "La Petite Singerie," a wonderful collection of aristocratic primate portraits. Also hanging, Marco Mazzoni's "Naturama" sketchbook pages and pen drawings of animals. View the artwork online! Read the rest

Bikini model photographed by a chimpanzee in a kimono, 1963

(@History_Pics via John Curley) Read the rest

Women, sex, and monkeys: what primatology can teach us about female desire

"With primatology, science has refused to see that females are the aggressors, the rulers, the initiators of sex. For so long, almost to a humorous extent, we have looked right past the truth; which is that the females are leaving their young, they're objectifying their mates, they're the agents of desire. The psychologist had to keep getting rid of his male monkeys because the females got bored with them!" A snip from Zoe Williams's Guardian piece on Daniel Bergner, author of What Do Women Want?, a new book about female sexual desire. Read the rest

Book about woman raised by monkeys

Last fall, I posted about Marina Chapman of Braford, England who claims that as a young girl she was raised by monkeys. Chapman says that when she was four-year-old, she was kidnapped from her Colombia home and dumped in the jungle where she spent five years in the care of capuchin monkeys. Eventually, hunters found her and swapped her at a brothel for a parrot. Chapman, now in her early 60s, has written a new book about her experience. It's titled "The Girl With No Name: The Incredible True Story of a Child Raised by Monkeys." From The Guardian:

In one of the most memorable sections of the book, she describes how she got terrible food poisoning from tamarind, and thought she was going to die. She was writhing in agony when an elderly monkey, which she now calls Grandpa, led her to muddy water. She drank the water, vomited and began to recover. After that, she says, the young monkeys befriended her. Marina observed them closely, and learned from them: how to climb trees, what was safe to eat, how to clean herself. She soon discovered that if she stood underneath monkeys carrying armfuls of bananas, they would inevitably drop a couple, and if she was quick enough she could grab them for herself. Over time, she says, the monkeys allowed her to sit in the trees with them. When they were away looking for food, she'd become lonely and would anxiously await their return…

Marina is sure she wouldn't have survived without the monkeys – thought to be capuchins, which are known to be well disposed towards humans.

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A brief history of space monkeys and spies

In the late 1950s, American scientists very publicly readied a crew of monkeys for a series of trips into Earth orbit and back. As far as the researchers knew, Project Discoverer was an actual, honest-to-Ike peaceful scientific program. Naturally, they were wrong about that. In reality, their work was part of an elaborate cover-up masking a spy satellite program. At The Primate Diaries, Eric Michael Johnson reports on some fascinating space history. Read the rest

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