Back to the Future III: home video behind the scenes


The house that starred as Marty McFly's home in the Back to the Future trilogy is at 9303 Roslyndale Ave in Arleta, California. While "Back to the Future Part III" was in production, a neighbor shot the home video above of the actors on set. (via Reddit)

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Princess Leia's bikini sells for nearly $100,000


One of Princess Leia's slave bikinis she actually wore in Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi sold for $96,000 at auction yesterday. No news on who bought it. The costume came complete with the collar and several links in the chain Leia used to strangle Jabba the Hutt. A 16" model of Leia's Blockade Runner seen in Star Wars: Episode IV A New Hope went for $450,000, the highest auction price ever for Star Wars memorabilia ever.

Other items sold in the same Profiles In History auction include one of Indiana Jones's bull whips ($204,000) and George Reeves's Superman costume from the 1950s TV series ($216,000).


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Watch the Angry Birds movie trailer!


Apparently, next summer "we'll finally find out why the birds are so angry."

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Western movie mega-supercut: Gunslinger


Smash TV's Gunslinger mines more than 50 classic and modern westerns and creates a hypnotic hyper-movie that shows off the formal requirements for a great hay-burner. Read the rest

Hieroglyphic illustrations featuring your favorite superheroes


Josh Ln's Heroglyphics are a series of illustrations of superheroes and movie characters posters (TMNT, Star Wars, Power Rangers, X-Men, Avengers and Spider-Man) available as posters, canvas prints, wall tapestries, etc. Read the rest

Ice Cube to star as Ebenezer Scrooge in new film

Rapper and business mogul Ice Cube will play Ebenezer Scrooge in "Humbug," another reboot of Charles Dickens's "A Christmas Carol." Tim Story, director of "Ride Along" (2014) and "Fantastic Four" (2005), is at the helm. Cube's Scrooge is a real estate tycoon who faces the ghosts of Christmas Past, Present, and Yet to Come.


Below, watch "Scrooge (Or Marley's Ghost)," the first film adaptation of "A Christmas Carol" from 1901!

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Drive-in snack-bar movie as David Lynchian horror-movie

It's a surprisingly good fit: from the FITC Toronto 2011 Festival. (via JWZ) Read the rest

See the shot similarities between all of the Indiana Jones films


"Indiana Jones 4 and the Echoes of the Past" Read the rest

Fury Road cosplay: wheelchair and amputated arm edition

When Fury Road came out, Laura Vaughn made an iconic post about how her left-arm transradial amputation gave her the potential to be the world's greatest Imperator Furiosa cosplayer -- and now she's done it, homebrew prosthetic and all. Read the rest

2-star Legend reviewer on the "marketing gold" of bad write-ups


The Guardian's 2-star outlier review of Legend was cleverly misrepresented on the movie poster. Author Benjamin Lee writes on how bad reviews like his can be turned into marketing gold.

There’s something maddeningly brilliant about this promotional sleight of hand. Technically, there’s nothing dishonest about the use of my rating. I gave it two stars and there are just two stars on display. I’ve been trolled and I’m totally alright with it. The word “chutzpah” has been used a lot on Twitter. … but … In 2000, Sony executives decided it would be smart idea to invent a critic who would miraculously always love all of their movies. David Manning, aka thin air, thought that Hollow Man was “One helluva scary ride!” while Rob Schneider’s critically loathed comedy The Animal was “Another winner!”. It resulted in a payout to those who had seen the films in question. Around the same time, it was revealed that Sony had also used employees to pose as moviegoers in a TV spot for Mel Gibson’s The Patriot. One of them described the violent drama with implied rape threats as “a perfect date movie”.

The tl;dr: the chutzpah in this particular example was brilliant, but don't let Hollywood normalize its manipulations of the press and its audience. Read the rest

First and final seconds of 55 movies, shown side-by-side


Jacob Swinney compiled this supercut of the opening and closing shots of 55 films. It's accompanied by Thomas Newman's "Any Other Name."

Films used (in order of appearance): The Tree of Life 00:00 The Master 00:09 Brokeback Mountain 00:15 No Country for Old Men 00:23 Her 00:27 Blue Valentine 00:30 Birdman 00:34 Black Swan 00:41 Gone Girl 00:47 Kill Bill Vol. 2 00:53 Punch-Drunk Love 00:59 Silver Linings Playbook 01:06 Taxi Driver 01:11 Shutter Island 01:20 Children of Men 01:27 We Need to Talk About Kevin 01:33 Funny Games (2007) 01:41 Fight Club 01:47 12 Years a Slave 01:54 There Will be Blood 01:59 The Godfather Part II 02:05 Shame 02:10 Never Let Me Go 02:17 The Road 02:21 Hunger 02:27 Raging Bull 02:31 Cabaret 02:36 Before Sunrise 02:42 Nebraska 02:47 Frank 02:54 Cast Away 03:01 Somewhere 03:06 Melancholia 03:11 Morvern Callar 03:18 Take this Waltz 03:21 Buried 03:25 Lord of War 03:32 Cape Fear 03:38 12 Monkeys 03:45 The World According to Garp 03:50 Saving Private Ryan 03:57 Poetry 04:02 Solaris (1972) 04:05 Dr. Strangelove 04:11 The Astronaut Farmer 04:16 The Piano 04:21 Inception 04:26 Boyhood 04:31 Whiplash 04:37 Cloud Atlas 04:43 Under the Skin 04:47 2001: A Space Odyssey 04:51 Gravity 04:57 The Searchers 05:03 The Usual Suspects 05:23

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Celebrate the 20th anniversary of Hackers at San Francisco's DNA Lounge

JWZ, owner of San Francisco's legendary DNA Lounge, writes, "Hey nerds, I think this might be up your alley. It's the 20th anniversary of the movie HACKERS and we're doing a movie screening, dance party, costume contest and Wipeout XL contest down at Ye Olde DNA Lounge." Read the rest

Little Brother optioned by Paramount

My bestselling 2008 novel YA novel Little Brother has been optioned by Paramount, with Don Murphy (Natural Born Killers, Transformers) as the producer. Read the rest

The Making of Stanley Kubrick's 2001 – An enduring cinematic masterpiece gets a book worthy of its brilliance


“Holy crap! It's a monolith!” After my recent bookworm-o-gasm over Taschen's new William Blake book, I didn't think I'd be having another dreamy out-of-box book experience anytime soon, but I was wrong. The venerable art book publishers outdo themselves again with their just released The Making of Stanley Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey.

The book was designed by the highly regarded Mathias Augustyniak and Michael Amzalag, together known as M/M (Paris). The duo has created a truly one-of-a-kind experience here, an artifact in book form that's worthy of the iconic artifactuality (Is that a word?) of the source material. (Did I mention: It's a monolith!) 

The book is 6.9” wide, stands 15” tall, and is covered in a lovely light-absorbing (and dust attracting) matte black stock. The book slides out of a glossy 4-sided wrap which contains the full-color cover art and back cover copy. Sliding the thick black slab from the sleeve, you're confronted by four sigil-like icons, representing stages of a Stargate journey, deep-embossed into the black cover board. The title on the spine is in black foil. Black on black. Lovely.

The cover opens portfolio-style (i.e. the cover spine is not glued to the bound pages inside). The cover and spine fold down flat, creating a kind of stage for unfolding the rest of the book. And stage is the right word, because that's what this books feels like: A performance. Many things feel different from a traditional book. Since the pages are so narrow, there are dozens of fold outs, in 2-panel, 3-panel, and 4-panel spreads. Read the rest

Visit the imaginary nightclub where movie characters mingle


"Hell's Club," a mash-up. Read the rest

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