Meet one of the last jukebox repairmen

Perry Rosen turned his passion for jukeboxes into a career. This man knows from motors, vacuum tubes, and turntables. If I had a jukebox, I'd ask Rosen if he could mod it to play with a punch to the chassis, Fonz style. Read the rest

Science themed music video made from remixed public domain footage

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Luke Williams writes, "I thought you might like this song called 'Make Heat' from my science-pop album MOONS." Read the rest

New Order "Ceremony" live in 1981

New Order performs "Ceremony," live in 1981. This was one of the last Joy Division compositions before the 1980 suicide of singer Ian Curtis and the remaining members became New Order.

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Weird and/or bad original names of now-famous bands

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My favorites from Rolling Stone's list "25 Worst Original Names of Famous Bands":

• The Salty Peppers ---Earth, Wind and Fire

• Smile ---Queen

• The Pendeltons ---The Beach Boys

• The Young Aborigines ---Beastie Boys

• The Obelisk ---The Cure

• Wicked Lester ---Kiss

• Screaming Abdabs ---Pink Floyd

• Tony Flow and the Miraculously Majestic Masters of Mayhem ---The Red Hot Chili Peppers

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The design of extreme heavy metal logos

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Logos from Hell is death metal illustrator/designer Mark Riddick's massive compendium of heavy metal band logos that he's gathered from across the globe. These are the sigils printed on foreboding LP jackets, scratched into school desks, scribbled onto notebooks, and inked into hesher arms the world over. From Wired:

As metal evolved into myriad subgenres, each more extreme than the last, wordmarks and branding evolved in step. “Logos just tend to get more and more extreme and as you branch out,” says Riddick. It’s reached the point that you can almost determine the style of music from the typography. Indeed, there might be no better example of typography’s multi-sensorial nature than extreme metal logos. Thrash metal bands like Metallica, Slayer, and Overkill adopted logos with straight, sharp edges to reflect the tight and controlled nature of the music. Death metal bands—which tend to focus on subjects like violence, religion, horror, and, yes, death—tend to incorporate those themes into logos that feature things like dripping blood, organs, severed limbs and skulls. The logos associated with black metal, which has its roots in deeply anti-Christian views, the occult and paganism, often are ornate, symmetrical, and derived from art nouveau’s swirling, rounded forms.

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Watch the White Stripes' "Seven Nation Army" played by 15,000+ people

Rockin'1000, consisting of 1000+ musicians, cover the White Stripes' "Seven Nation Army" with 15,000 of their closest friends on vocals.

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Stunning and weird portraits of musical note vibrations

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Artists Jeff Louviere and Vanessa Brown explore cymatics, the study of wave phenomena and how they are represented visually. Using black-colored water, a laptop computer, and a modified guitar amp, they captured "portraits" of the 12 notes in the chromatic scale. From my sister-in-law Heather Sparks's profile of their project in Nautilus:

In each ("portrait"), Louviere and Brown saw a distinct image: G looks like a devil, C# is the tree in the Garden of Eden, and F is something like the underbelly of a frog. If you were to repeat this experiment, you would get the same designs.

Pressing further their idea that “sight can be seen and images can be heard,” Louviere turned the 12 sound-induced patterns back into sound using Photo Sounder, a program that assigns sounds to the black and white values it scans along the x and y axes of an image. After applying the program to the 12 portraits, Louviere had 12 very distinct, “odd and bleepy” sound files, which he mixed together into a final soundscape born from the visuals of all 12 notes.

"This Is What Musical Notes Actually Look Like" (Nautili.us)

The audio is now available on a beautiful vinyl record: Louviere + Vanessa: Resonantia

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Today is the 30th anniversary of REM's "Lifes Rich Pageant"

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Thirty years ago today, REM released the magnificent "Lifes Rich Pageant," an iconic alternative rock album of the 1980s, and forever. The source of the title is the 1964 film A Shot in the Dark:

Inspector Clouseau opens car door and falls into a fountain. Maria: "You should get out of these clothes immediately. You'll catch your death of pneumonia, you will." Clouseau: "Yes, I probably will. But it's all part of life's rich pageant, you know?"

Above, one of Michael Stipe's favorite songs from the entire REM catalog, "Fall on Me," about oppression. Below, "Swan Swan H."

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Premiere: Trippy cinematic surf music reissues from 1960s-70s Australia

In 1971, Australian filmmaker Paul Witzig released his fourth surf movie Sea of Joy, celebrating the rise of the short boards. To score the film, Witzig enlisted Sydney band Tully, best known at the time as the backing band for the Australian production of the psychedelic musical Hair. Now, the good people at Anthology Recordings have reissued Tully's "Sea of Joy" soundtrack on vinyl. Here's what they say about the release:

Like many surfers and non-surfers alike, Witzig had been mesmerised by Tully's concert performances. By the time he finished filming his latest surfing epic, Evolution, the sound of Tully had changed though. Gone was the organ-dominated sound (the group was reputedly the first Australian band to use the Moog synthesiser), replaced by more gentle melodies, many with spiritual significance.

Recorded at EMI's Sydney studios, Tully's soundtrack material was subsequently edited for the album release into cohesive musical interludes. As such, they are held together in the album sequence by a magnetic musical flow that starts with “Sea Of Joy (Part 1)” (above) and ends with “Sea Of Joy (Part 2).” Vinyl edition features booklet liner notes by Aussie surf historian Stephen McParland and other-wordly ephemera.

Along with Tully's "Sea of Joy," Anthology Recordings have also reissued Tamam Shud's glorious soundtrack to Witzig's prior surf film, "Evolution."

Pitted. So pitted.

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Dig this portable record player from 1966

I really dig the design of this 1966 portable record player! If I had one, I'd play Manfred Mann's "Pretty Flamingo" on it too.

"You can treat it just like a transistor radio and the sound is free of distortion however you carry it!"

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The Fresh Tank Engine of Sodor

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Will Smith's entry in the annals of catchy Thomas the Tank Engine remixes is even better than Biggie the Tank Engine.

Also, "Insane in the Train" is the perfect title, but that mix isn't quite up to the gold standard of the others:

Here's Back in Coal Black, just madness: Read the rest

Watch Iggy Pop and Tom Waits acting weird, as directed by Jim Jarmusch

In Jim Jarmusch's original short film "Coffee and Cigarettes: Somewhere in California" (1993), Iggy Pop and Tom Waits celebrate quitting smoking by having a cigarette, enjoy some awkward chit chat, and confess their love for IHOP coffee. Here's Jim Jarmusch talking about shooting the scene:

Tom was exhausted. We had just shot a video the day before for "I Don't Wanna Grow Up" and he had been doing a lot of press. He was kind of in a surly mood as he is sometimes, but he's also very warm. He came in late that morning - I had given him the script the night before - and I was with Iggy. Tom threw the script down on the table and said, "Well, you know, you said this was going to be funny, Jim. Maybe you better just circle the jokes 'cause I don't see them". He looked at poor Iggy and said, "What do you think Iggy?" Iggy said, "I think I'm gonna go get some coffee and let you guys talk." So I calmed Tom down. I knew it was just early in the morning and Tom was in a bad mood. His attitude changed completely, but I wanted him to keep some of that paranoid surliness in the script. We worked with that and kept it in his character. If he had been in a really good mood, I don't think the film would have been as funny."

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The Gathering of the Juggalos turns 17

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The RNC in Cleveland isn't the only unhinged, drunken, drug-fueled marathon party going on this week.

Starting today, thousands of Juggalos and Juggalettes gather in Thornville, Ohio, to participate in the 17th Annual Gathering of the Juggalos, which runs through Saturday.

Each year at the Gathering, fans of Insane Clown Posse gather to celebrate the weirdness that unites them. The "Juggalo" moniker is from the rap act's 1992 track, “The Juggla.”

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Tiffany Trump's dreamy synthpop track is the best thing any Trump has ever done

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Like a bird likeabird a bird a birdabirdabirdabirdabirdabirdabird.

A remix could fix the evident problems. The poor woman ("widely known for her rich-kid instagram") is being dragged out to support dad at the convention this evening; this track sadly gained no headway in 2014.

I see you like that spot above Crawling through the liquid love You're cute and you're Tweeting™ me! Baby you go beep, beep, beep! Everybody partying Obsessing over crazy things I just want serenity While living it up!

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Prophets of Rage play Cleveland RNC, kick off 'Make America Rage Again' tour in 35 U.S. cities

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The Republican National Convention will have an unwelcome soundtrack this week from activist supergroup Prophets of Rage.

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Incredible LEGO record store by artist Coop

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Our multitalented artist pal Coop meticulously designed and built an indie record shop entirely out of LEGOs! Right this way to Brick City Records!

And yes, he really did make tiny versions of his favorite LP covers in Photoshop, print them on decal paper, and stick them to LEGO tiles for the records:

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Hear William S. Burroughs read the most depraved bits of Naked Lunch atop beautiful music

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Let Me Hang You is a collection of unreleased recordings of William S. Burroughs reading Naked Lunch accompanied by lovely and trippy music from psych-garage-soul player King Khan, experimental guitarist Bill Frisell, pianist Wayne Horvitz, violinist Eyvind Kang, and other guests. Listen below! The album will be released on Friday (7/15) from Khannibalism/Ernest Jenning Record Co. From the album announcement:

Twenty years ago, William S. Burroughs was asked to record an audio version of his favorite parts of Naked Lunch. Longtime associates and producers Hal Willner and James Grauerholz produced several sessions, and they recruited a team of world class musicians to help. Famed for their Naked City involvement, Bill Frisell and Wayne Horvitz contributed their genius, as well as Eyvind Kang, just to name a few. The recordings were then abandoned and collecting dust on a musty shelf, as forgotten as a piece of rancid ectoplasm on a peepshow floor.

In 2015, Hal Willner decided to reopen this unfinished masterpiece and asked help from King Khan (a musician that he and Lou Reed admired and became fast friends with). Hal sent Khan all of the recordings and asked him to add his gris gris to this extremely perverted gumbo... and history was made and the scum began to rise!

King Khan recruited M Lamar, the creator of the "Negrogothic" movement and the identical twin brother of transgender actress Laverne Cox (Orange is the New Black), and The Frowning Clouds, a band of young Australian boys who have mastered the sixties garage punk sound...

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